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C Schmidt
08-04-2008, 08:03 AM
Does anyone have fulton county, ga code available? Looking to see what tolerances are (if any) for unevenness in finished flooring (hardwoods)? Or if the code even speaks to it at all. I have a hallway in my house that slopes to the right (ie slopes perpendicular to the joists). Rooms off this hallway are a small powder room and a laundry room. So, it slopes towards the laundry room and powder room. It is noticable if you walk into the laundry room or into the powder room. It would be less noticable if I had a carpet runner.

It appears that an LVL support beam was actually placed higher than the other ones. The inspector said that there are no signs of settlement or structural defects in this area and that, unfortunately, it is just that one beam is higher.

You may not believe me but I actually don't want to do anything about it because jacking up the floor will cause damage (and it is a beautiful fairly new home). At the same time, I don't want it to come back to bite me on resale though. And we obviously would not want to shave the beam itself (playing with fire as my structural engineer would say).

The inspector I had said that the fix is worse than the condition itself.

Since it's a small hallway, can anyone see any reason why I should have the builder fix this?

Thank you for any input.

Billy Stephens
08-04-2008, 08:17 AM
-- I have a hallway in my house that slopes to the right (ie slopes perpendicular to the joists).

You may not believe me ---.
.
Sometimes this condition can be caused by Little Tiny Chips that fall off Brick. :)

Scott Patterson
08-04-2008, 08:34 AM
Does anyone have fulton county, ga code available? Looking to see what tolerances are (if any) for unevenness in finished flooring (hardwoods)? Or if the code even speaks to it at all. I have a hallway in my house that slopes to the right (ie slopes perpendicular to the joists). Rooms off this hallway are a small powder room and a laundry room. So, it slopes towards the laundry room and powder room. It is noticable if you walk into the laundry room or into the powder room. It would be less noticable if I had a carpet runner.

It appears that an LVL support beam was actually placed higher than the other ones. The inspector said that there are no signs of settlement or structural defects in this area and that, unfortunately, it is just that one beam is higher.

You may not believe me but I actually don't want to do anything about it because jacking up the floor will cause damage (and it is a beautiful fairly new home). At the same time, I don't want it to come back to bite me on resale though. And we obviously would not want to shave the beam itself (playing with fire as my structural engineer would say).

The inspector I had said that the fix is worse than the condition itself.

Since it's a small hallway, can anyone see any reason why I should have the builder fix this?

Thank you for any input.

Codes will not really address the levelness of a floor. This is a quality issue with the builder. About the only thing you could use would be the guidelines that are put out by the National Association of Home Builders. They tell the builder what is acceptable or not, but they are only guidelines and not the gospel.

I'm assuming that you have already closed and are in the home. If this is the case, then the chances of the builder making a repair like this is right about Zero! Before closing, well you are in control and the builder would make the repairs or you don't close on the home! He who has the Gold makes the rules!

Jerry Peck
08-04-2008, 08:42 AM
I believe Georgia uses the ICC codes with addendums, in this case the IRC with addendums.

The IRC does not specifically address 'floor levelness', however, it does address 'walking surface levelness' for stairs, including treads and landings.

Given the above, there is a stair leading to the second floor, thus there is a landing at the second floor, that landing would be the 'second floor flooring', which would then (for at least the width of the stairs wide by the width of the stairs deep - a minimum of 36" by 36") be required to meet this.

From that point on, I guess the floor could slope, however I suspect that is not the intent of the code.

From the 2006 IRC.

- R311.5.5 Stairway walking surface. The walking surface of treads and landings of stairways shall be sloped no steeper than one unit vertical in 48 inches horizontal (2-percent slope).



The above is 1/4" per foot slope. Which would allow for a 3/4" drop across a 3' wide hallway. :eek:

That said, most hardwood floor specifications want no more than a 1/4" difference over 10 feet, not a slope, but no rise or dips from level. That would get down to a manufacturer's requirement from your floor manufacturer.

C Schmidt
08-04-2008, 09:32 AM
Thanks to you all. I am grateful for the responses. I greatly appreciate it.
I probably won't do anything about it because I can live with it.