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  1. #1
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    Default Holmes On Inspections

    I finally got around to watching one of these. Reality TV at its worst. The premise of the show was around asbestos on hot water heat pipes. The asbestos wasn't accessible and really wasn't visible. Would most of us found it and reported it? Yes, because of the age of the house. But would I have suggested removing it, no because it wasn't accessible. But they torn apart the basement to remove it. Probably spent at least $15K on mitigation...

    The electrician was also a winner. Said the inspector should have called out having a pair of romex wires under a staple that was designed for one wire. Did he go back and fix, no. Talked about old breakers being installed like we would ever call that out either....

    Mike also said the bumpout was done all wrong but only added a roof vent and improved the drainage. Never mentioned whether the previous owners got permits.

    The only real miss I saw was potentially a a bathroom leak into the living room, don't know if it was there 14 months earlier when they bought the home.

    Don't think this will be on my watch list.....

    //Rick

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    "Tear it all out." That's his favorite saying. I quit watching Holmes a long time ago.

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    For all you fans out there, fill your boots

    Mike Holmes wants to fix the world

    And he figures hes got just 13 years left

    by Jonathon Gatehouse on Monday, December 13, 2010 9:00

    Mike Holmes wants to fix the world - Arts & Culture - Macleans.ca


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    I have an idea.

    Why don't we all pack a 10lb sledge hammer in our tool bag for use on our next home inspection?

    Come on...let's have some fun!


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Breedlove View Post
    "Tear it all out." That's his favorite saying. I quit watching Holmes a long time ago.
    I think you hit on the right idea Bruce.
    Unfortunately, the general public is still watching.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    The general public loves Holmes.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    From The Canadian Home Inspector magazine - Mike Holmes Inspections - Career opportunities in Toronto area, SW Ontario, Calgary, Vancouver and anticipate further expansion to other urban centres in the near future.

    We better get to work on our resum-eh's.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Holmes mentioned asbestos was "circled on the original inspection report form". Holmes then went on to say he would have had the buyers come over to the opening in the wall and make a really big production about showing them the PACM and strongly recommend it be tested by a professional if he had done the original inspection. The original inspector did report asbestos. The homeowner just did not read the inspection report. As Gomer used to say: Surprise, Surprise Surprise!

    The Asbestos remediation inspector mentioned that there was no danger with the existing installation containing asbestos because it was sealed behind finish materials and was not friable.

    This show is not much different that his other show(s). He comes in after work has been done and explains how he would have done it differently and better. He tears out everything and rebuilds to his standards. All his structural work is put together with screws. Never uses a nail. Would never pass inspection in the US. Silly canuk.

    "The Code is not a peak to reach but a foundation to build from."

  9. #9
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    Talking Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Do you think a using a sawzall would be considered an intrusive inspection? Oh, just think what we could do with one of those!?!


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    From The Canadian Home Inspector magazine - Mike Holmes Inspections - Career opportunities in Toronto area, SW Ontario, Calgary, Vancouver and anticipate further expansion to other urban centres in the near future.

    We better get to work on our resum-eh's.
    Holmes Inspection actually had a recruitment booth at the CAHPI annual conference in Kelowna this year... I really don't mind them coming here as it should help to spotlight and educate the public on what a quality home inspection should include and help raise fees to a reasonable level.

    Hopefully it'll help shut-down some of these $250 whole-house inspections.

    Joe Klampfer RHI
    www.myinspection.ca
    Pacific Home Inspections

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Watching how that guy frames with screws... too funny. Does he own a framing nailer... or are they only for *hacks*?

    Canadian Guys-
    Are screws an approved fastener in Canada? I've seen that the few times when he's building his partitions with screws... as if he's doing it *better*

    Screws are not an approved connection method for framing that I've seen...Simpson has some fasteners that are approved in place or lieu of nails... never seen anything on framing.

    Put a screw between opposing pliers... snap!! Put a nail between the same.. bend if you're lucky.

    But we *already knew that* right?


  12. #12

    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Clarksville Home Inspection
    JW Goad
    TN License #307 | KY License #2402

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Spargo View Post
    Watching how that guy frames with screws... too funny. Does he own a framing nailer... or are they only for *hacks*?

    Canadian Guys-
    Are screws an approved fastener in Canada?
    No, that's not a Canadian thing, it is a Mike Holmes/DeWalt thing. In his world, hammers are for smashing stuff.

    Actually, I have read somewhere that they are using structural grade screws, which should be OK. The trouble is, nobody watching the shows knows there is a difference, and nobody is telling them to buy the expensive screws for their projects.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Klampfer View Post
    Holmes Inspection actually had a recruitment booth at the CAHPI annual conference in Kelowna this year... I really don't mind them coming here as it should help to spotlight and educate the public on what a quality home inspection should include and help raise fees to a reasonable level.

    Hopefully it'll help shut-down some of these $250 whole-house inspections.
    Yes purchasers pay a premium for a Holmes inspection, but what the client doesn't realize is that at least half of the inspection goes to Holmes group, with the other half for the inspector. The client is still getting home inspection conducted to industry standards.

    The inspector must pay for his own E&O, overheads, and take any liability which may come along through a faulty inspection.


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    GRK and Spax both make structural screws that can be used for framing. Very nice screws, not cheap though.
    For rehabs like he is doing it doesn't make economic sense to use that many screws. Nails are cheaper and for most stuff faster. Either he is charging enough to absorb the cost or it has something to do with filming. Maybe the compressor and guns don't work well with filming and sound control.
    Some of what he does is good and bad. A lot of it though clearly indicates he has a very liberal budget available.

    www.aic-chicago.com
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    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Wand View Post
    half of the inspection goes to Holmes group, with the other half for the inspector. The client is still getting home inspection conducted to industry standards.

    The inspector must pay for his own E&O, overheads, and take any liability which may come along through a faulty inspection.

    The client wouldn't care about the mechanics of the fee break-down, because it's the "make-it-right" sizzle and hype they're selling and that's all the client knows or cares about.

    I look forward to them raising the bar a notch or two. I certainly welcome them here a lot more than some of the quick-and-dirty on-line certifications that do nothing but confuse the general home-buying public and erode the reputation and respect of quality inspections.

    Last edited by Joe Klampfer; 12-25-2010 at 02:51 AM.
    Joe Klampfer RHI
    www.myinspection.ca
    Pacific Home Inspections

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    I just saw my first Holmes On Inspections episode last night(12/26/10). He did make the statement that what he was doing was not the home inspector's job. He was doing Phase 2. I also agree that the home inspector should have noted a crawl space without access in his report and what that could mean to the buyer in both the near and distant future.

    Probably the most disagreeable aspect of the program and its predecessor, "Holmes on Homes", is that what he does would never, or very unlikely, be possible in real life. The actual cost is paid by the production company through program fees, advertisers, manufacturer and supplier promotions. The H on H show frequently had volunteer contractor's help on the projects. A fee is paid whenever a product name is mentioned or shown on the program. That's the reason for blurred out names on shirts, hats, tools, products, or equipment; No pay - no show. The actual cost of the project is not mentioned. I agree entirely with the "Do it right the first time" philosophy, but in reality, how many people would be willing to or able to pay the cost out of their pocket?

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Imagine if a homeowner calls you 6 months to 1 yr after they bought their house. They hand you an inspection report and tell you they are having these specific problems at these locations. Can you please inspect our house and tell us what is wrong. Should be pretty easy for even the worst inspector to find a problem given those set of circumstances.

    From the 2 shows so far, the show said the original inspectors found and reported the problem or Holmes stated that what he is doing is beyond a normal home inspection. Only the first 5 minutes of the hour show is an "inspection". Mostly it is shots of Holmes carrying around his tool bag or him fondling his IR camera or probe camera.

    Home inspecting is a boring process to watch. Mostly just an old guy walking around squinting at different parts of a house and taking photos. Showing pictures of most defects is not even particularly useful because most people don't know what a correct installation looks like so wouldn't recognize the defect even when pointed to.

    The Wow factor is tearing apart the home exposing the structure, knocking huge holes in walls and floors, and lamenting how if they had built it correctly in the first place, they would not have had to destroy everything in their path.

    As an industry we can only hope that people begin to think of home inspectors as a diagnosticians and call us for more than just a home sale and also for ongoing problems within their homes. The use of IR and probe cameras would be the norm and would be cost effective to maintain.

    "The Code is not a peak to reach but a foundation to build from."

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Ramsey View Post
    Imagine if a homeowner calls you 6 months to 1 yr after they bought their house. They hand you an inspection report and tell you they are having these specific problems at these locations. Can you please inspect our house and tell us what is wrong. Should be pretty easy for even the worst inspector to find a problem given those set of circumstances.

    From the 2 shows so far, the show said the original inspectors found and reported the problem or Holmes stated that what he is doing is beyond a normal home inspection. Only the first 5 minutes of the hour show is an "inspection". Mostly it is shots of Holmes carrying around his tool bag or him fondling his IR camera or probe camera.

    Home inspecting is a boring process to watch. Mostly just an old guy walking around squinting at different parts of a house and taking photos. Showing pictures of most defects is not even particularly useful because most people don't know what a correct installation looks like so wouldn't recognize the defect even when pointed to.

    The Wow factor is tearing apart the home exposing the structure, knocking huge holes in walls and floors, and lamenting how if they had built it correctly in the first place, they would not have had to destroy everything in their path.

    As an industry we can only hope that people begin to think of home inspectors as a diagnosticians and call us for more than just a home sale and also for ongoing problems within their homes. The use of IR and probe cameras would be the norm and would be cost effective to maintain.
    Oh yeah! I would love to do the tear stuff open part. I want to do that somewhere in most inspection and I usually end up lamenting about the way stuff was or is built even if it's just to myself. Hey! Maybe I could be a stand in for Mr. Holmes. Okay, I'm not a big tall blond dude. More like a short, fat, balding, old-guy but with some makeup and special effects?

    Forget all that, just let me interview the hot babes that wear low-cut tops. There's usually at least one on every job (Not his daughter. I'm not a total pervert) Just what a construction crew needs, a boob show. It's a wonder they don't have more accidents. Guy screws his hand to a board, falls off ladder, electrocutes himself. I noticed his daughter wore a t-shirt not a low-cut, "look at us" display top.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    I do not think I could add $10,000 - $20,000 to my $395 inspection fee.

    Actually, in Wa. State, it is against the law for an inspector to do work on a home that they inspected for a period of approx 12 months after the inspection.

    I assume the State means for profit ????? Maybe not....

    I was a home-builder for 25 years and am happy to pass the torch


  21. #21
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    It just goes to show you that Holmes has no clue about ethics, or SOP's, let alone understanding the industry.

    He employs two of his children in the repairs he undertakes as part of the Holmes Inspections.

    The inspectors he claims were negligent have no chance to refute what Holmes claims as faulty inspections.

    Holmes has no understanding of the SOP otherwise he would not conduct his own inspection then rip things apart.

    Holmes also has no certifications for IR, does not belong to any associations, nor does he to my knowledge hold an trade certifications.

    I wonder how many clients are naive enough to anti up for a second inspection if the first inspection causes them to walk?


  22. #22
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by kevin hergert View Post
    I do not think I could add $10,000 - $20,000 to my $395 inspection fee.

    Actually, in Wa. State, it is against the law for an inspector to do work on a home that they inspected for a period of approx 12 months after the inspection.

    I assume the State means for profit ????? Maybe not....

    I was a home-builder for 25 years and am happy to pass the torch

    If you were to go to court the argument might be made that "profit" would be any beneficial gain by the inspector (not only money). Homes inspection is not really an inspection and don't forget it is Canada. They march to a different drummer than the lower 48 (or Obama's count of 56 plus Hawaii). Reality shows are seldom reality. Most people find reality boring. They want sensationalism. Homeowners like to watch the demo part of job but loose interest quick watching the framing process.

    You might be able to if inspected the property as a contractor with the ability for the customer to get $40,000 of work for only $10,395. Not a "Home Inspection" but an inspection of the home for repairs that are needed (the spiting of the hairs). It is sad that a qualified and honest contractor can not do a "home Inspection" without having to tell the client that they (contractor) can only schedule the repairs/corrections 12 months from the inspection date. Though many do wait to have the work done by the person that they trust and respect.

    Remember the Magician never tells how the trick was done. Homes doesn't tell where he gets the edge or insight to his determinations. The show is all about him (that's the reality).


  23. #23
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Stuart,

    I saw the 12/26 episode also and don't think anyone would have called out the lack of crawlspace. Even Holmes said that he didn't know what was under the floor. There were no vents so that area could have been completely filled in up to the floor joists. All one could say that it wasn't built on a slab.

    The key issue - cold floor and walls would not have been found during a spring/summer or fall inspection even with an IR cam unless you had a really cool day. Ditto for the kitchen electrical circuit. Why the Building Department let them extend the circuit is beyond me. Local building department here would have made them upgrade the electrical. HI's don't do code enforcement....

    //Rick

    Rick Bunzel
    WWW.PacCrestInspections.com
    360-588-6956

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Bunzel View Post
    Stuart,

    I saw the 12/26 episode also and don't think anyone would have called out the lack of crawlspace. Even Holmes said that he didn't know what was under the floor. There were no vents so that area could have been completely filled in up to the floor joists. All one could say that it wasn't built on a slab.

    The key issue - cold floor and walls would not have been found during a spring/summer or fall inspection even with an IR cam unless you had a really cool day. Ditto for the kitchen electrical circuit. Why the Building Department let them extend the circuit is beyond me. Local building department here would have made them upgrade the electrical. HI's don't do code enforcement....

    //Rick
    I saw that one too (I know, I need to better police my viewing habits ) and would only comment that I would have called out the lack of access to that crawl space and possibly the lack of labeling of the electrical circuits. Beyond that, everything they dealt with is beyond the scope of any home inspection as it was hidden.
    A really sharp HI might have picked up the lack of electrical circuits but again, that is beyond the scope.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    Jim,

    I am curious - if they are no vents how would you know there is a crawlspace?

    //Rick

    Rick Bunzel
    WWW.PacCrestInspections.com
    360-588-6956

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Holmes On Inspections

    I would assume any wooden floor framing system (hollow sounding) is over a crawl space or at least should be. From the floor height above grade as well as the sound and feel of a floor it is obvious whether a floor is a slab or not. Of course it is really easy here since 99.9% are either concrete slab on grade or wooden over a crawl space. Basements just are not used here as a rule but from that show it was pretty obvious just looking at the basement and outdoor shots.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

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