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  1. #1
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    Default Reinspection agreement

    I know many inspectors won't do a reinspection, but to those who do, does anybody have a sample agreement / disclaimer that they have the client sign when doing a reinspection? Can I get a copy? Thanks

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    Please clarify what reinspection means. After the initial or 3 months later?
    I have a few lines at the bottom of my regular contract stating essentially how much the reinspection will cost (varies, open line item) and that the reinspection will be to verify if/how defective items from the summary page either have or have not been remedied by the seller.
    Usually the seller fixes some items and gives credit for others. It's important to verify if Seller's fix actually complies or not.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Barnicle View Post
    I know many inspectors won't do a reinspection...
    Many inspectors, like me, can't do re-inspections unless we want to work without a net (in$urance).


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    I think it's best addressed in your original agreement.

    The bottom of my re-inspect form just tells them it's the same terms and conditions as the original inspection and to refer to that document.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    John, what do you mean 'can't'? How do you service your clients that way? What do you do if the Seller claims items are repaired prior to closing and buyer would like you to verify? So say 'No'. I don't understand.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Keller View Post
    John, what do you mean 'can't'? How do you service your clients that way? What do you do if the Seller claims items are repaired prior to closing and buyer would like you to verify? So say 'No'. I don't understand.
    I mean "can't" in that my in$urance company doesn't cover re-inspections. I tell my clients that all repairs should be done by qualified professionals who provide detailed receipts and stand behind their work. If the seller has the work done, they should provide such receipts.

    One way I explain this to clients is this: Suppose you go to your family physician, who is a generalist. And he or she sends you to a specialist, such as a dermatologist, and the dermatologist performs some procedure on you. Do you now return to your family physician and ask him or her if what the specialist did is correct? No. If you have concerns, you go to another dermatologist. Your family physician is not qualified to pass judgment on the specialist.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    John, I'd like to continue this discussion if you don't mind.
    Obviously, I cannot question your ins. carrier policies etc. so please don't take my questions in that way.
    I'd like to give a couple examples and see what you think.
    Example #1 - You go do the original insp and find mismatched breaker/wire sizes in the panel and call it out. Later Seller says condition has been repaired. You do the reinsp and find that now breakers and wire sizes are correct.
    Example #2 - You do the original insp and find that vent piping appears to be installed for the unit (dryer, bath vent, microwave combo) but that the vanes/flapper at the exterior does not open upon activation. Later Seller says condition repaired. You go out see the flapper is closed, go inside and activate the unit, go out and the flapper is now open.
    In my mind, in both examples an HI would be inspecting under the same standards during both inspections, so I don't understand the conflict.
    It's not like going out and verifying that the new AC condenser installed by the Seller is of adequate size etc.
    Another aspect of the reinspect for me is revenue and client relations.
    I don't charge a lot for reinspects, so I prefer to not 'leave the house' just for one. If I have an insp in the morning, I'll schedule the reinsp for later that day, thereby increasing revenue for that day. It adds up by the end of the year.
    Also, clients are really happy to get the service. It gives them a better feeling about the deal. I've even gotten a few referrals from the seller's side because I was willing to go out and verify conditions prior to close.
    On a side note, I did a condo recently, seven 30 amp breakers hooked to #12 &14 wires.

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    I side more with Markus on this issue. They (re-inspections) aren't all the same. A roof repair that may not be visible or determinable is not the same as checking to see if a circuit is now protected by a working GFCI device. I don't have a blanket policy of "not doing re-inspections". I decide if I'm capable of helping in the situation or not. If I feel capable, I do it, usually at no charge. I know that is anathema to some of you, but for the 1/2 hour it takes me, I gain a lot of good will between me and the client.

    That's just my opinion, you are free to do whatever works best for you.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    Marcus,

    In #1, the repair is easily verifiable, so the liability issue is minimal.

    In #2, you are only looking at the circuit breaker/wire size. What if there are other problems that were not addressed? Possibly something that an average HI would not know. The issue is that generally the "last man in" gets the blame. The HI is the generalist and the electrician is the specialist and, theoretically) should know more. If the electrician does work and the HI verifies that everything is OK the HI is accepting the liability. I try not to do reinspections, but to do as John does. Advise them to get documentation from the contractor that does the repairs.

    Department of Redundancy Department
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    I used to do re-inspections all the time.
    Then I found out my insurance carrier would not cover them, so I stopped. Got a lot of grief from clients, Realtors, etc. In turn, I went to my insurance carrier and complained.

    My insurance carrier reversed itself and will cover re-inspections, so I'm back doing them.

    Most of the time, I try to talk my clients out of them. I tell them to get paperwork from the professionals that did the work, and many things they can see for themselves. If they do need me to come out and look at something, I will do it - it just costs them more money.
    JF


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Feldmann View Post
    ...My insurance carrier reversed itself and will cover re-inspections, so I'm back doing them. ..
    Jack - My insurance is through FREA. I'd be interested to know if yours is also, if you don't mind.


  12. #12
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    Smile Re: Reinspection agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    I mean "can't" in that my in$urance company doesn't cover re-inspections. I tell my clients that all repairs should be done by qualified professionals who provide detailed receipts and stand behind their work. If the seller has the work done, they should provide such receipts.

    One way I explain this to clients is this: Suppose you go to your family physician, who is a generalist. And he or she sends you to a specialist, such as a dermatologist, and the dermatologist performs some procedure on you. Do you now return to your family physician and ask him or her if what the specialist did is correct? No. If you have concerns, you go to another dermatologist. Your family physician is not qualified to pass judgment on the specialist.
    I guess I don't understand; depending on the house of course, 75% of the house was built by a "specialist", and the other 25% may have been changed by the homeowner. Does that mean you can't inspect that 75% of the house? What about new home inspections, certainly the entire home was built by "specialists"?


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Nettnin View Post
    I guess I don't understand; depending on the house of course, 75% of the house was built by a "specialist", and the other 25% may have been changed by the homeowner. Does that mean you can't inspect that 75% of the house? What about new home inspections, certainly the entire home was built by "specialists"?
    Lee - I agree with you, it's confusing and the role of the home inspector sometimes feels pretty poorly defined. One reason I didn't argue with my in$surance company, as Jack did, is that I have had too many experiences with re-inspections where I have repeatedly gone back to the same property, as the seller tries to incrementally get me to lower my standards by doing half-assed repairs, to the point where I start looking like the bad guy who is holding things up. Meanwhile, getting someone (my client? the seller?) to pay for my time becomes a major pain. I prefer to keep things simple, do my job, and emphasize in the strongest terms that only qualified professionals do any and all repairs. It's not a perfect world, but it works for me.


  14. #14
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    My experiences with re-inspects very closely mirrors John's. My E&O carrier (Allen) does not cover me for reinspects. Therefore, I don't do them. It's pretty starightforward so I don't know how anybody can argue with this decision not to do reinspects. If somebody wants to go and fly without a net, that's their choice. And like John said, have the sellers provide paperwork and receipts from the professionals who performed the repairs as proof the work was done. We are generalists and not specialists. Necessary repairs often involve more work than we are able to see during a visual, non-invasive home inspection. Sure, one could do a reinspect but if you can't verify with 100% certainty that everything that needed to be done was done and was done properly, what is the client getting from you?

    I had a reinspect that turned into a big headache and the time I spent on it far eclipsed the meager reinspect fee I charged. The sellers had gotten pissed at the buyers because of how much money they were spending on repair requests. So when they got to the fixing the last item on the list, they told the carpenter they were only willing to spend $XXX.XX amount on repairs for damaged ceiling joists in the basement. The carpenter in turn fashioned a ridiculous method of repair which I shook my head at the second I saw it. I told the my client the work was crap. After multiple phone calls with my client, his agent, the seller's agent, and the carpenter, I was ready to pull my hair out. The selling agent and carpenter wanted me to tell them how the repair should be done and I told the carpenter the onus on designing and completing the proper repairs fell on him. I told him what I like to see (not telling him how to fix it) and he agreed that my description is the method he would normally employ to repair the damaged joists. But since the sellers placed a dollar limit on what they would pay him, he agreed to the repairs I poo-pooed. Therefore, he agreed that he cobbled together a half-ass repair to get paid something instead of walking away from the job.

    Those are headaches I do not need. We can't save the world. You do what you can, get paid, help your client within reason, and move on.


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    I'm totally with Gunner on this one and suggest for those on the "fence" to get a hold of their local real estate sales contract and read the section on "repairs" as I believe they will find it most enlightening.

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Reinspection agreement

    My insurance carrier is Capital Special Risks


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