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  1. #1
    Brad Borden's Avatar
    Brad Borden Guest

    Default Ridge Beam Splice

    I found a ridge beam that was spliced today. I wanted to know if recommending a structural engineer to evaluate and install a certificate on the splice is the right mode of action.
    Beam is a 2X10 28' long. Rafters are 16" O.C.. There is one vertical 2X4 support on a wall about 16' from the top of the ridge and the splice is another 6' down from the support. The splice was made with a piece of OSB.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    Looks like someone had the right idea, just poor execution of it.

    Yeah, I'd call for a structural engineer to design appropriate repairs, then tell my client to take that engineering letter and throw it away ( just kidding), they one they really want is the one which says the repair was done in accordance with the engineering design.

    Make two copies of BOTH letters, laminate them, staple one at the repaired area and one at the attic entrance.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3

    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    It looks like a hip and not a ridge.... just pointing it out in case..............
    Hip And Valley Beam Design In Roof Beams | StruCalc


  4. #4
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    There is no carpenter in my area, which is bigger than your area, no matter where you live, that would refer to that as a hip "beam". Hip or hip rafter would be correct.

    If the scarf (or other) joint is correct, the only thing missing is longer sister members and a support beneath the joint to a load-bearing wall.




    Splicing Hips and Valleys
    Q.
    Framers in our area typically splice long hip and valley rafters with the scarf joint shown in the illustration. Is this adequate to support the roof load?
    A. Robert Randall responds: No, the scarf joint you show is not adequate to support typical roof loads on a hip or valley rafter. These members must be able to function as bending beams carrying substantial vertical loads.
    Hip and valley rafters should never be compromised by such a weak splice. If splicing is required, secure a sister that runs at least four or five feet on either side of the joint. This splice should be capable of developing the full bending strength of a continuous member. Spike the overlapping piece together with plenty of well-placed nails, or better yet, with carriage bolts, as shown.
    An even better alternative would be to use engineered lumber (such as Microlam LVL), which is available in the required lengths. Although this material will cost more, it will offset, at least in part, the labor cost of making a splice. And the end result will be superior.




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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon Whitmore View Post
    It looks like a hip and not a ridge.... just pointing it out in case..............
    Hip And Valley Beam Design In Roof Beams | StruCalc

    You are correct: it not a "ridge beam", it is a "hip rafter".

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    There is no carpenter in my area, which is bigger than your area, no matter where you live, that would refer to that as a hip "beam".
    That's because they would call it a "viga de la cadera" (which, according to the translator, is the same for 'hip beam' and 'hip rafter').

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    Brad Borden's Avatar
    Brad Borden Guest

    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    Thanks for setting me straight.


  8. #8
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    That's because they would call it a "viga de la cadera" (which, according to the translator, is the same for 'hip beam' and 'hip rafter').
    JP: Actually, Juan and Jose refer to hip rafters as trabes de cresta (lima tesas). The ridge board is a ridges cabellette is Babel Fish BS, or, if you will, lip from the hip.


  9. #9
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    Oops, shot that one out a bit too soon. Let me try that again . . .

    JP: Actually, Juan and Jose refer to hip rafters as trabes de cresta (lima tesas). The ridge board is a ridges cabellette. Viga de la cadera is Babel Fish BS, or, if you will, lip from the hip.

    That's better.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Ridge Beam Splice

    From todays inspection.

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    Plano, Texas

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