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  1. #1
    Gabe S's Avatar
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: First Post

    Welcome.

    Curious as to why you want to leave the contracting business?

    I see more people at the moment wanting to remodel their home instead of purchasing a new home.

    rick


  3. #3
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Post

    Welcome Gabe, the grass is not always greener......

    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...-contract.html


  4. #4
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    Two years ago business starting to slow. It was tuff to get work and overhead was not going away. At that time we had a baby, so I put the business on hold and went back to school for civil engineering degree. Still have a year and a half to go in school and am thinking about doing inspections on weekends to pull in some money.

    The committment for each job is less. Half a day compared to two weeks to a month to finish a bathroom and kitchen job.

    I know inspections are a decent amount of work, but I don't think they compare in physical labor to what I was doing, and if I can make in two and half hours almost what I was making in a whole day, the gig doesn't seem all that bad. I think you guys have it pretty good.


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Two years ago business starting to slow. It was tuff to get work and overhead was not going away. At that time we had a baby, so I put the business on hold and went back to school for civil engineering degree. Still have a year and a half to go in school and am thinking about doing inspections on weekends to pull in some money.

    The committment for each job is less. Half a day compared to two weeks to a month to finish a bathroom and kitchen job.

    I know inspections are a decent amount of work, but I don't think they compare in physical labor to what I was doing, and if I can make in two and half hours almost what I was making in a whole day, the gig doesn't seem all that bad. I think you guys have it pretty good.

    Wow......................Did I say Wow.

    Holy moley

    Oh my goodness.

    If that don't beat all.

    We have it pretty good huh. Obviously cost to get that inspection.... .......Insurance..............marketing........... ...liability.................vehicle.............g as...............more insurance.................2 1/2 hours huh. Again....no idea what so ever the total amount of time involved in one inspection.....how about the report. How about the software. How about the computer, the tools, the follow up, website, advertisement, hosting etc etc etc etc etc.

    We are out here trying to make a living and you are talking about the yuk it up crap, you guys have it good only 2 1/2 hours per job.

    How about the cost involved in getting a license, the course, the tools, the actual know how. You think you have been doing some remodel work so what the hell, you can do inspections, how much could it take, how much does a home inspector have to know. How about the knowledge of every trade out there combined.

    Do you live in a state that requires licensing, insurance continuing ed. New comers are going to pay a few thousand just to cover their sorry but with insurance so you don't lose that house you are living in when you screw up. With the attitude you have...trust me...you are going to screw up.

    I am done with this convo. Keep dreaming

    I tell youn what. Contact a home inspector in your area. Pay him to let you go on an inspection. Do the inspection as he does. Do a report like it should be done. Then come back on here and tell us what an absolute complete ass you made of yourself and how ignorant you are to what a home inspection really is and what is involved.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: First Post

    Hi Gabe... welcome to the board. You're right that this is a pretty good gig when it's going. But the problem now is it's barely going. Work is really tough to come by even for guys that have been doing it for many years. I couldn't even imagine trying to start out right now but sooner or later things have to turn around and there should be some decent demand.

    It sounds like you're about where I was with civil engineering when I took a term off..... and never went back

    Engineering is a great background for this but there is a lot more to it which you likely have from doing contracting. I've always thought the best background is remodeling since you see things torn apart and then put back together. Tradesmen (electricians, plumbers, framers, etc.) usually just install stuff. And, mostly just one focused item in a house.

    If you do proceed in inspections be ready to be really, really patient.... it's really slow in most areas.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post

    I know inspections are a decent amount of work, but I don't think they compare in physical labor to what I was doing, and if I can make in two and half hours almost what I was making in a whole day, the gig doesn't seem all that bad. I think you guys have it pretty good.

    Come on out to Arizona in June July Aug or Sept. I'll take you on some ride alongs at no charge. The only requirment I have is , you have to crawl every sq' of the 140-150 degee attics with me.

    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  8. #8
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    Default Re: First Post

    Ted, take a chill pill man. Let's not exaggerate about all the expenses, overhead, etc. I know what it takes to run a business as I mentioned in my post I was a remodeling contractor for a number of years.

    I think relative to other trades and professions, home inspectors have it ok.

    Also, let's not debate the physical labor comparison of actually performing remodeling work and actually inspecting houses. If I weighed all my tools and you weighed all yours, mine probably weigh over 100 times yours with no exxageration and that is not counting that I have to carry materials up several flights of stairs (tiles, tools, cabinets, etc.).

    Dan, come out to NY and I'll have you sanding 9' and 10' ceilings with a poles sander for a whole day on a 100 degree day, and you'll be begging to get back on you ridges.

    Ted, you made too many assumptions about my knowledge base of which you know nothing about unless you have been reading my posts on other home remodeling forums for that last few years which I doubt you have by reading your post.

    I do believe that an inpector needs to know a great deal about houses and systems.

    Now if we calculated how much inspectors make profit on a per hour basis after expenses, I think they get paid more than 90% population per hour.

    I calculated an average inspection to take around 2-2 half hours to complete. Am I that way off???


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    Hi Gabe... welcome to the board. You're right that this is a pretty good gig when it's going. But the problem now is it's barely going. Work is really tough to come by even for guys that have been doing it for many years. I couldn't even imagine trying to start out right now but sooner or later things have to turn around and there should be some decent demand.

    It sounds like you're about where I was with civil engineering when I took a term off..... and never went back

    Engineering is a great background for this but there is a lot more to it which you likely have from doing contracting. I've always thought the best background is remodeling since you see things torn apart and then put back together. Tradesmen (electricians, plumbers, framers, etc.) usually just install stuff. And, mostly just one focused item in a house.

    If you do proceed in inspections be ready to be really, really patient.... it's really slow in most areas.
    Better late than never.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: First Post

    "You think you have been doing some remodel work so what the hell, you can do inspections, how much could it take, how much does a home inspector have to know. How about the knowledge of every trade out there combined."

    Just did a 110 year old house yesterday - buyer's agent and buyer had contractor there to take measurements, make list of missing fixtures, etc... 203K FHA loan financing. Contractor stated that the wiring had been updated based on his observation of 3 prong outlets. No power or water to property at tie of inspection. I told him 3 prong outlets don't mean "Jack ****" as far as being a determining factor whether the wiring was updated or the outlets were grounded. In front of him, the agent, the buyer, buyer's dad and grandfather, I pulled the cover, pulled the outlet and left it hanging out of the wall by the knob and tube that was connected to it, then went about my business. After everyone had left except the buyer some 4 hours later, I explained to him about how an Electrician knows electricity and how a general contractor usually has only general knowledge and how easy it is to obtain a general contractor's license. I hope he payed attention....


  11. #11
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    Default Re: First Post

    Gabe,

    Here is a portion of a "form email" I send out to each client. Perhaps you need to educate yourself as to how many items an inspector looks at during the course of an inspection. My client service has garnered many referrals from past clients. Just Wednesday I performed an inspection for a couple who were the sellers of an home I inspected for the buyers 3 weeks prior. They were impressed with my thorough inspection and commitment to the buyers' interest. It's good news when sellers engage you for their inspections when they decide to buy.

    I say go for it. Educate yourself. Get your accreditation. Get to work!
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    What can you expect of our inspection?

    If you have been through the inspection process before then you will recognize some of the information provided here. If this process is new to you, then here's what you can expect.

    The following components will be inspected in accordance with the ASHI Standards of Practice, a nationally recognized standard, which is included with your report:

    grounds, exterior, foundation, roof, plumbing, heating, cooling, electrical, interior (2), garage, kitchen and bathrooms. There are 13 reporting pages in the report which you will receive at the end of the inspection.

    You will also receive an informative 79 page guide, Basic Home Systems , explaining the operation of the structural, electrical and mechanical systems of your home.

    The inspection time varies depending on the size of the home, age of the home, and the number of deficiencies discovered. You can expect the physical inspection to take at least 4 to 6 hours for a 3000 square foot home. The reporting portion, where the deficiencies are pointed out and placed in context, will take about 2 hours. We schedule only one inspection per day to ensure that your inspection will have our full focus and attention.

    If you have specific concerns or questions regarding the property it is helpful to make a list to bring with you at the time of reporting or email the list to us prior to the inspection. We want to address those questions or concerns to your satisfaction. The report is the critical part of the inspection. This is when you get the vital information.

    Our service agreement will require your signature before the report can be covered. A copy can be sent to you if you wish to review it before the inspection. The cost of your inspection is $xxx payable by check at the end of the inspection.

    As a part of our client commitment, we offer follow-up consultation at no cost.




    Thanks,
    Barry


  12. #12
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    Talking Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hintz View Post
    "You think you have been doing some remodel work so what the hell, you can do inspections, how much could it take, how much does a home inspector have to know. How about the knowledge of every trade out there combined."

    Just did a 110 year old house yesterday - buyer's agent and buyer had contractor there to take measurements, make list of missing fixtures, etc... 203K FHA loan financing. Contractor stated that the wiring had been updated based on his observation of 3 prong outlets. No power or water to property at tie of inspection. I told him 3 prong outlets don't mean "Jack ****" as far as being a determining factor whether the wiring was updated or the outlets were grounded. In front of him, the agent, the buyer, buyer's dad and grandfather, I pulled the cover, pulled the outlet and left it hanging out of the wall by the knob and tube that was connected to it, then went about my business. After everyone had left except the buyer some 4 hours later, I explained to him about how an Electrician knows electricity and how a general contractor usually has only general knowledge and how easy it is to obtain a general contractor's license. I hope he payed attention....
    Sorry for the typos. Really, I am not an illiterate.


  13. #13
    Gabe S's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Lewis View Post
    Gabe,

    Here is a portion of a "form email" I send out to each client. Perhaps you need to educate yourself as to how many items an inspector looks at during the course of an inspection. My client service has garnered many referrals from past clients. Just Wednesday I performed an inspection for a couple who were the sellers of an home I inspected for the buyers 3 weeks prior. They were impressed with my thorough inspection and commitment to the buyers' interest. It's good news when sellers engage you for their inspections when they decide to buy.

    I say go for it. Educate yourself. Get your accreditation. Get to work!
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    What can you expect of our inspection?

    If you have been through the inspection process before then you will recognize some of the information provided here. If this process is new to you, then here's what you can expect.

    The following components will be inspected in accordance with the ASHI Standards of Practice, a nationally recognized standard, which is included with your report:

    grounds, exterior, foundation, roof, plumbing, heating, cooling, electrical, interior (2), garage, kitchen and bathrooms. There are 13 reporting pages in the report which you will receive at the end of the inspection.

    You will also receive an informative 79 page guide, Basic Home Systems , explaining the operation of the structural, electrical and mechanical systems of your home.

    The inspection time varies depending on the size of the home, age of the home, and the number of deficiencies discovered. You can expect the physical inspection to take at least 4 to 6 hours for a 3000 square foot home. The reporting portion, where the deficiencies are pointed out and placed in context, will take about 2 hours. We schedule only one inspection per day to ensure that your inspection will have our full focus and attention.

    If you have specific concerns or questions regarding the property it is helpful to make a list to bring with you at the time of reporting or email the list to us prior to the inspection. We want to address those questions or concerns to your satisfaction. The report is the critical part of the inspection. This is when you get the vital information.

    Our service agreement will require your signature before the report can be covered. A copy can be sent to you if you wish to review it before the inspection. The cost of your inspection is $xxx payable by check at the end of the inspection.

    As a part of our client commitment, we offer follow-up consultation at no cost.




    Thanks,
    Barry
    Good for you Barry, but I think you are probably the 1% of inspectors who take 4 to 6 hours to inspect a home. From watching inspections and speaking to other inspectors, the ones I have witnessed took an hour and fifteen minutes to two hours.

    That contractor was obviously incompetent to make a general statement on the electrical system by looking at a three prong outlet. However, I believe a competent home improvement contractor has the knowledge base to begin doing home inspections.


  14. #14
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    Default Re: First Post

    Welcome Gabe, and good luck. I think you have a great background for this. One of the things that attracts me to home inspection is the opportunity to walk around and teach people how their homes work along with finding problems - and having a background in remodeling certainly helps this.


    As for some other (rude) posters, you've found that there are a lot of helpful people on this forum....along with a few who have a chip on their shoulder, and a few others who have tried to read too many code books and over-analyze every minute difference they see that doesn't match up with a figure in a textbook.

    Anyway, good luck, and I welcome your expertise in the field to these discussions.


  15. #15
    Gabe S's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by jason schatz View Post
    Welcome Gabe, and good luck. I think you have a great background for this. One of the things that attracts me to home inspection is the opportunity to walk around and teach people how their homes work along with finding problems - and having a background in remodeling certainly helps this.


    As for some other (rude) posters, you've found that there are a lot of helpful people on this forum....along with a few who have a chip on their shoulder, and a few others who have tried to read too many code books and over-analyze every minute difference they see that doesn't match up with a figure in a textbook.

    Anyway, good luck, and I welcome your expertise in the field to these discussions.
    Thanks. I'm glad to have stumbled upon this site. Hey, every crowd has different personalities. That's what makes it fun.


  16. #16
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    Thumbs up Re: First Post

    Good luck and welcome..
    first I will agree w/ the good luck getting your business going and be patient, then I have to awaken you to costs as has already been said, after you get started and get out of the hole you dug to get started, including time marketing, gas print materials time, etc.. if you want to stand out you HAVE to do the thorough and competent 3+ hour inspections. Anyone who says they can inspect a home thoroughly and do a report in under 3 hours is B.S.ing, they likely aren't nearly as thorough as they think, I take that back, they are not.
    Check list reports are not a service to your clients as much as computer generated w/ photos, if you do photos learn to take VERY good pics zeroing in on the concern w/ macro enabled if it's a small area, photos are worth a thousand words and you don't get the denials as long as your description of location is sufficient for the average 3rd grader to find, as you will find many act as if they are when looking for the concern.
    As far as 90 %?? If you dream of netting anywhere near that in this business you are breaking the law and not paying taxes! After taxes, advertising, (for those like me who can't stand agents and won't work for them) insurance, continuing ed. (usually $500 per yr. just for cont. ed. if your lucky) association fees, tools, of course you already have most but will need a few, then you better get Errors and Omissions Ins. to prevent loosing everything you own the first 5 years. You will learn quickly how much you don't know when walking w/ a client and being asked every imaginable question there is to be asked about EVERY component of the house, and to top that off you BETTER know alot more than what they may think of to cover your own butt for things that will come about after they move in, if you miss anything that should have been noticed it's yours..
    Simply put if you end up with 40% of the fee you did very good. But you won't, I guarantee it, that is if you run an honest business.
    Best advise I can give is go to 10 homes in the next 10 days of friends you know, try to get a varying degree of age and style, order an American Home Inspectors report to sample and go at it, it will guide you through the inspection by the way they have it set up. By my estimation you will be dizzied by the amount of information you need to know and you will take 4 hours each. By the way, have someone with you acting as a client and tell them to honestly ask questions about things as if they were buying a home. When you ee things you can't explain, be honest, write it down, research it and send an addendum by email. That way you learn and they respect the honesty.
    In the beginning, 13 yrs ago I was doing about 10 a week in a booming market with little competition, I then went to 3 a day but quickly found brain power faded at the third 1/2 way through so after a few years of doing that I won't do over 2 a day and raised my rates to make up for it. Hope this helps, if you want to know how not to work for agents and stay busy email me.. Good luck.


  17. #17
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Ted, take a chill pill man. Let's not exaggerate about all the expenses, overhead, etc. I know what it takes to run a business as I mentioned in my post I was a remodeling contractor for a number of years.

    I think relative to other trades and professions, home inspectors have it ok.

    Also, let's not debate the physical labor comparison of actually performing remodeling work and actually inspecting houses. If I weighed all my tools and you weighed all yours, mine probably weigh over 100 times yours with no exxageration and that is not counting that I have to carry materials up several flights of stairs (tiles, tools, cabinets, etc.).

    Dan, come out to NY and I'll have you sanding 9' and 10' ceilings with a poles sander for a whole day on a 100 degree day, and you'll be begging to get back on you ridges.

    Ted, you made too many assumptions about my knowledge base of which you know nothing about unless you have been reading my posts on other home remodeling forums for that last few years which I doubt you have by reading your post.

    I do believe that an inpector needs to know a great deal about houses and systems.

    Now if we calculated how much inspectors make profit on a per hour basis after expenses, I think they get paid more than 90% population per hour.

    I calculated an average inspection to take around 2-2 half hours to complete. Am I that way off???

    Like I said. You believe you know everything already. To begin with the first construction site I went to and helped out on I was ten. That was off and on throughout my teens as I got into later teen I worked weekends and summers and then directly out of school I have been building, remodeling, rehabbing and inspecting all my life. You have nothing on me what so ever. I can tell you that inspecting all my life made me a better builder/remodeler/contractor. The things I had to know as an inspector reflected back to my next job with a new knowledge.

    All I can say is to go out and be released into a home with another inspector. Ask no questions. Just do the inspection. Do the report. When you find out that you have not inspected half the items properly and screwed up the entire inspection and blew the report altogether then come back on here and tell us how much you blew it.

    Being from New York you have an attitude. I came from 36 years in Mass. I also have an attitude. You are the type that no one can tell you anything. No matter what anyone here has told you, you just keep coming back at how knowledgeable you are and we, collectively, have no clew where you are coming from. 2 to 2 1/2 hours for an inspection....seriously. Have you not read anything. Do you just think these inspections fall in your lap. They take a serious amount of money to get. They take a serious amount of time to get. All these inspections have reports to do afterward the fact and follow up to do with your client and the Realtor, if for nothing else, to keep the inspections coming.

    If you counted the amount of time spent to get a business up and running and keeping it running along with the time inspecting, reporting and following up that inspection that you are going to do tomorrow is in reality an 8 hour inspection and will be for years until you get all that time spent getting the work flowing caught up. Now if you think you are now done the time and money that keeps work coming has to be continuously be added up. Your days off are partially spent in making sure the work is coming. etc etc et etc etc etc

    Have you ever heard the expression...You don't know Jack.....Everything I just touched on and what everyone else has told you and then all your come backs tell me and everyone on here that....You don't know Jack.

    For the rest of you folks that read this forum that want to or are just getting into home inspection...sorry....but pay attention to the threads like this and really pay attention to what everyone is saying. Another thread on here is going in the same direction.

    You want advise....listen...take it a in..heed what the experienced are telling you. Now if you don't want advise and you ask for it then you are wasting your time and ours.

    The guys who have been around for years that do not have home inspector schools will tell you exactly where it is at. If you want all the rosy and peachy stuff then look in the mirror and talk to yourself.


  18. #18
    Mitchell Toelle's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Good for you Barry, but I think you are probably the 1% of inspectors who take 4 to 6 hours to inspect a home. From watching inspections and speaking to other inspectors, the ones I have witnessed took an hour and fifteen minutes to two hours.

    That contractor was obviously incompetent to make a general statement on the electrical system by looking at a three prong outlet. However, I believe a competent home improvement contractor has the knowledge base to begin doing home inspections.
    I spend about the same amout of time as Barry, and I don't consider this quality level of service to be in the 1% range at all. Expect to spend between 3 and 6 hours on average sized homes based on age and conditions, perhaps in addition to a client walk through (with tons of questions), and another 2-4 hours writing your report. Also, expect $3000 plus for your E&O insurance, in addition to marketing expenses and other overhead.

    BTW Gabe, tell us what you would inform a client regarding K&T wiring. What would you be looking for and what should your client do. This is important. Gee, you even have time right now to search the WWW to find your answer, and you won't have that same time when faced with this condition in front of your client.

    Good luck.


  19. #19
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    Default Re: First Post

    Ted, I think you are way off base in interpreting my posts. Therefore I'm not even going to respond to your lengthy replies.

    If I saw knob and tube wiring, I would tell my client it is seriously outdated and needs upgrading even if it is functioning properly.

    In my five years of contracting in NY, I still have not ran into knob and tube wiring. The oldest I've seen BX cable with cloth insulation and four fuse box panel. Only saw knob and tube in pics.


  20. #20
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Ted, I think you are way off base in interpreting my posts. Therefore I'm not even going to respond to your lengthy replies.

    If I saw knob and tube wiring, I would tell my client it is seriously outdated and needs upgrading even if it is functioning properly.

    In my five years of contracting in NY, I still have not ran into knob and tube wiring. The oldest I've seen BX cable with cloth insulation and four fuse box panel. Only saw knob and tube in pics.
    No need to respond. Just listen and heed. You just don't get it.


  21. #21
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    Kenny,

    I was looking at the matrix deluxe reporting binders. You don't think those are sufficient enough even with notes attached? The inspector who taught our field training class uses them.

    My reasoning is that my short term memory is good and if I wait till after the inspection to write the report I might forget to put something that I saw in. With the report as you go, that would ensure you don't leave anything out.


  22. #22
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    Default Re: First Post

    Ted, you sound like an old timer to me. I ran into people like you all the time when I do jobs. Boy, was it frustrating dealing with them.


  23. #23
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by jason schatz View Post

    As for some other (rude) posters, you've found that there are a lot of helpful people on this forum....along with a few who have a chip on their shoulder, and a few others who have tried to read too many code books and over-analyze every minute difference they see that doesn't match up with a figure in a textbook.
    .
    Rude posters, a few with a chip on their shoulders ?
    Analyze every minute difference?
    If every minute difference isn't analyzed here, it sure will be in the real world by an attorney that's out to get everything you own for failing to properly analyze a defect in the field.

    Welcome to the real inspection world.

    This site advertizes everthing an inspector needs to know, not hey pay me $s and I'll tell you know everything you need to know, make you rich and feel good.

    Last edited by Dan Harris; 07-02-2010 at 09:04 AM.
    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  24. #24
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Ted, you sound like an old timer to me. I ran into people like you all the time when I do jobs. Boy, was it frustrating dealing with them.
    Teds a kitty cat. Wait till AD joins in

    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  25. #25
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    Default Re: First Post

    Ok. Let's end this thread. It's getting old and filling up my email box. I guess the bottom line is that you need to be einstein to inpect homes, I think I know know more than I really do, and no one should start a home inspection business (except for Ted, because he knows everything). It's been real chatting.


  26. #26
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    Default Re: First Post

    If in some instances you can't do the report on-site, which is what I do, the photos you take will jog your memory.. just take alot, I average 40 on a good home 75-80 on a home needing alot, over 100 on a home w/ tons of issues or alot bigger. Time spent on the inspection rises accordingly, 3 hrs. is a small home w/ average issues..


  27. #27
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    Default Re: First Post

    OUCH! That NACHI thing won't get you any respect from seasoned inspectors, they certified a young girl once and were featured on tv as a anybody can pass association. They have great resources though and Ben is a freakin' genius when it comes to marketing..


  28. #28
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    Default Re: First Post

    Sorry, my dumb ass just saw it was a banner floating suspiciously beneath your post..


  29. #29
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    Default Re: First Post

    Gabe,

    I know that there are some inspections that may only take 2 hours, but I have never been on one yet, nor have I ever been with an inspector buddy who has. For me it is not uncommon to take 4 hours. Do I exceed the standards of practice, yes. I don't do representative samples unless I'm limited by personnel belongings. My motto is If I can check then I check it.

    I try perform the inspection as if it was my home to buy. I know this is cliché but I do try. There will alway be judgment calls on how far to go, risk vs reward.

    I hope to be in the upper 1% I guess. There are some very good inspectors that are faster than me but I am not in a race. I hope to have clients at the end of the day think they got every penny of what they paid.
    I should mention that I do structural pest inspections on every inspection which requires a little more reporting and time.

    I work under the Wash. State, Wash. St. Dept. of Ag. and InterNachi Standards. In the State of Washington licenses and insurance is more expensive than general contractors.


    I find the work, in general, very fun and interesting and hope you do too.

    I don't post here much but I do read, I do learn from others here. There are some very knowledgeable gents, even when they rant.

    Good luck,

    Don Hester,
    The Confluence of Quality and Integrity | www.ncwhomeinspections.com

    Don Hester
    NCW Home Inspections, LLC
    Wa. St. Licensed H I #647, WSDA #80050, http://www.ncwhomeinspections.com

  30. #30
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    Hi Gabe and welcome. You will find that those of us with a few years of experience are passionate about our profession, as a person should be.

    You will also find that folks tend to say things with a keyboard when they would not do so in person. And then to some it does not matter, they are just gruff and rough around the edges with everyone.

    If you gain anything from this thread it should be that the home inspection profession is not as easy and as profitable as it looks. I have been at this gig for over 15 years and I have never seen it as slow as it is now. Folks are just not buying enough homes to support the number of inspectors we have. I have seen the number of inspectors in my state drop from 1100 down to around 400 in the past 18 months! We are a licensed state so it is easy to track the numbers. I see you are in New York. NY is also a licensed state so you should be able to see how many inspectors are in your area. Do the math and check on the number of homes that have sold. Take that number and divide in half and then divide that by the number of inspectors in the area. This will give you a good idea of how many inspections an established inspector is actually doing in your area.

    Get your training, take and pass the National Home Inspector Exam and then hang your shingle. A good number of inspections to shoot for your first year should be 50 to 75. If you can make it to your 3rd year you have about a 50% chance in making it to your 5th year. If you make it to 5 years you are over the hump and you should make it to your 10th and on and on.

    Good luck...

    Last edited by Scott Patterson; 07-02-2010 at 10:00 AM.
    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  31. #31
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Harris View Post
    Rude posters, a few with a chip on their shoulders ?
    Analyze every minute difference?
    If every minute difference isn't analyzed here, it sure will be in the real world by an attorney that's out to get everything you own for failing to properly analyze a defect in the field.

    Welcome to the real inspection world.

    This site advertizes everthing an inspector needs to know, not hey pay me $s and I'll tell you know everything you need to know, make you rich and feel good.

    Analyzing is necessary. But you seem to have a lot of posts, you know the over-analyzing that happens here at times. Listen, there's no substitute for actual experience.... As in tearing apart, putting back together, or fixing the very components we are inspecting. I would be very skeptical of any inspectors opinion who does not have this experience.

    And listen, anytime you go into a forum and mention someones job as being easy or better than yours, you're gonna ruffle some feathers...so be it.

    I'm with gabe, thread over.


  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Toelle View Post
    I spend about the same amout of time as Barry, and I don't consider this quality level of service to be in the 1% range at all. Expect to spend between 3 and 6 hours on average sized homes based on age and conditions, perhaps in addition to a client walk through (with tons of questions), and another 2-4 hours writing your report. Also, expect $3000 plus for your E&O insurance, in addition to marketing expenses and other overhead.

    BTW Gabe, tell us what you would inform a client regarding K&T wiring. What would you be looking for and what should your client do. This is important. Gee, you even have time right now to search the WWW to find your answer, and you won't have that same time when faced with this condition in front of your client.

    Good luck.
    One item that I have seen blow right by many is....."Hey, you need another 6 inches of insulation in the attic to bring it up to reasonable Resistance values"

    But they forget to tell them not to cover that old, deteriorated, fire waiting to happen, knob and tube wiring. There are many items to inform your client about and it is not just the wiring itself.

    I touched my voltage sniffer down (not intentionally) in some insulation about 3 to 4 weeks ago. Knob and tube everywhere, some live some not. My voltage sniffer went off just touching the semi , not quite damp but some moisture in it (more humid air) , insulation.

    Pretty scary stuff no matter what some folks think of it. It is amazing that home had not burned down yet.

    Last edited by Ted Menelly; 07-03-2010 at 06:32 AM.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    4 to 6 hours to inspect a home.

    I know what you mean, if I got out in only 4-6 hours that meant the house was falling down and my client finally got the picture and decided to walk away from it without finishing the inspection.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  34. #34
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    Default Re: First Post

    As a newcomer it's comforting to hear some of the long hours the veterans are putting in doing their inspections. I did a 5000 square footer that was 85 years old last week and had been vacant for 3 years....6 hours on site...another 4 hours writing the report. This was a stately old place that had past it's prime...the basement felt and looked more like the hold of an old schooner than a house.


  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Foster View Post
    As a newcomer it's comforting to hear some of the long hours the veterans are putting in doing their inspections. I did a 5000 square footer that was 85 years old last week and had been vacant for 3 years....6 hours on site...another 4 hours writing the report. This was a stately old place that had past it's prime...the basement felt and looked more like the hold of an old schooner than a house.
    __________________________________________________ __________________________

    Sounds like you put in the time to look at everything. Good for you!

    I had one recently 5 BRs, 7 baths, office, 3 bay garage with finished basement and gourmet kitchen......10 1/2 hours in two days....about 6500 sq ft. I use the Matrix Deluxe reporting system with lots of notes on the pages and in this case gave a CD to the client with between 100-120 photos. Photos are good documentation for your inspections. This client also needed about 6-7 hours of face to face reporting time with about half on site. I also did a follow up inspection on the "repair" issues he asked for in the addendum...about another 3 hours.

    Good client relations plus good home inspection practices require time. If one is not willing to put in the time, one cannot expect to do well. My business comes through referrals, about 95% through agents. I maintain a good working relationship with them by educating them about the necessity to protect the client. If any agent thinks my inspections are too long then I really don't want to do their clients' inspections.

    Keep up the good work. I truly believe that the conscientious inspectors will take the business away from the "quick buck" guys who do the "walk through" inspections.


  36. #36
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    I really am glad to hear so many inspectors taking their time to do good/great inspections. I have talked to some inspectors who say they can do 2 - 3 a day and have the reports at the end of the inspection. I'm thinking how! I usually have about as much time in report writing as I do in the inspection. So if you are doing 4-5 hr inspections, report writing (3-5hrs) and travel (1-4hrs), I would say that is a pretty good day. And we are not even talking being on these threads!!

    Also there are times I need to research something when I get home so how can I produce a good thoughtful report in the field. No one can have that much information that they can recite and remember everything in the field.

    I come with an Hazardous Material (biological, radiological and chemical) emergency response and remediation background in addition to construction/destruction and I know that you never can know all the reg's but you best know where to find them.

    I know I learn a lot from reading these threads and discussions. I try to incorporate what I think fits into my business model. And I try to always be open to suggestions, from everyone.

    My hat is off to you all!

    Don Hester
    NCW Home Inspections, LLC
    Wa. St. Licensed H I #647, WSDA #80050, http://www.ncwhomeinspections.com

  37. #37
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    Default Re: First Post

    Don said, "I have talked to some inspectors who say they can do 2 - 3 a day and have the reports at the end of the inspection. I'm thinking how! "

    The time taken to do an inspection really has little bearing on the quality of the inspection/report. Granted, I would say it is impossible to do a 5,000 SF house in an hour, but just because someone takes 6 hours to do 2400 SF does not mean they are a stellar inspector. It just means they work at a different speed.

    I have no trouble doing two inspections a day, finishing the reports on site. I have been doing so for almost 21 years. Its just the way I work, and my comfort level. I average about 3 hours on most inspections. MY average drive time between inspections is almost always less than 45 minutes. I do inspections at 9 am and at 1:30 pm

    Last week I did a 980 SF house and was there over 4 hours, then drove to a 2800 SF house and was finished in 3. I take whatever time it takes to do the job, there isn't a bonus for finishing early, or a penalty for taking longer than expected.

    But the amount of time taken to do an inspection, or write a report has nothing to do with the quality of the product, IMHO.


  38. #38
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    Jack-

    I must take back some of what I said. I do agree that there are some who can do 2 a day and be very very thorough. I know that I can not.

    I know of a very good inspector that does 2 a day, and I have been with him on his inspections and I know he does great work. So my apologies to you and others.

    The majority of the inspectors that I know usually do only one a day. And 4hrs on an inspection is common.


    I find that the reports, for me, take some time. Especially if the client wants more detailed suggestions to handle issues and I want to give them reference material and some ideas what to expect from who ever is going to do the repair work.

    Again my apologies. Those comments where just my opinion.

    Don Hester
    NCW Home Inspections, LLC
    Wa. St. Licensed H I #647, WSDA #80050, http://www.ncwhomeinspections.com

  39. #39
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    Gabe S, Welcome to the board. Jack F. is right, I have no problem at all doing 2 or 3 inspections a day, and giving the reports at the time of inspection. I make more money doing inspections even now with the poor economy than anything I have ever done. Sure you can spend a whole bunch of money buying code books, infrared cameras, and home repair manuals to give to your buyers, but none of it is needed to be a profitable home inspector. As you can see not everyone agrees on this board, I' am one of the oldest members on this board, and I get the most ridicule of anyone because I stick to the SOP. If you know what you think you know about the normal operating systems of a house, you should not have any problems making a lot of money inspecting. There is NO WAY anyone can spend 6 to 10 hours on a home inspection and make a lot of money, ( people can't spend that much for a inspection ) and also give the buyer books of information on how long systems last, when to change filters, how often to mow the grass and so on. My report is 13 pages of nothing but the facts, no what might happen or call someone else to look at it. Gabe just remember to keep it simple and you will do fine. Good luck, Tony M.


  40. #40
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    Default Re: First Post

    "There is NO WAY anyone can spend 6 to 10 hours on a home inspection and make a lot of money, ( people can't spend that much for a inspection" ??

    I did a 110 yr. old 8500 sq. ft. home and charged $1450, it took 11 hrs. total.. I'm pretty happy w/ the 130+ per hr., often do large homes or 4-12 plexes for anywhere from $650.- $3000, still pretty happy. Fees have to be convinced, I seldom have that problem.. and I agree w/ J.F. on his post completely..





  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Mount View Post
    Gabe S, Welcome to the board. Jack F. is right, I have no problem at all doing 2 or 3 inspections a day, and giving the reports at the time of inspection. I make more money doing inspections even now with the poor economy than anything I have ever done. Sure you can spend a whole bunch of money buying code books, infrared cameras, and home repair manuals to give to your buyers, but none of it is needed to be a profitable home inspector. As you can see not everyone agrees on this board, I' am one of the oldest members on this board, and I get the most ridicule of anyone because I stick to the SOP. If you know what you think you know about the normal operating systems of a house, you should not have any problems making a lot of money inspecting. There is NO WAY anyone can spend 6 to 10 hours on a home inspection and make a lot of money, ( people can't spend that much for a inspection ) and also give the buyer books of information on how long systems last, when to change filters, how often to mow the grass and so on. My report is 13 pages of nothing but the facts, no what might happen or call someone else to look at it. Gabe just remember to keep it simple and you will do fine. Good luck, Tony M.
    Someone's finally starting to make sense on this board. I was starting to get worried about you guys.


  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Mount View Post
    There is NO WAY anyone can spend 6 to 10 hours on a home inspection and make a lot of money, ( people can't spend that much for a inspection ) ...
    Another comment from someone who continually shows that he does not know what other do and can do, or what can be done.

    When I was doing inspections before I retired I was spending 2-3 days typical on an inspection, 3-4 days including the report, with many inspections taking even longer, and there was A LOT of money to be made doing that.

    Some people just have no foresight and/or no ability to think outside the box they are in, or even realize they are in a box.

    Gabe, whatever you decide to do, don't get trapped in the box so many people trap themselves in.

    Will what I do work to the extent it did for me in every market? Of course not.

    Likewise, though, every market does not require you do do 2 inspections per day.

    Unless you are out in the boondocks, back country, no actual decent sized city within reasonable driving distance, there likely is a market for high end inspections performed where you give your clients more than any other inspector, and that market appreciates that, that market has come to expect being treated better.

    Can you do only those types of inspections in your market? I don't have that answer, you need to look at your market to find out.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  43. #43
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    Gabe,

    Welcome to the discussion board. Please note that this is a "full contact" message board, and many of your seemingly innocent posts will get shreaded. There are a lot of sea gulls here. They like to fly around and **** on everyone.

    Having said that, you may learn a lot from the experiences of others. Don't take the profession lightly. There is a LOT of risk and liability. A lot. Get insurance and keep it up to date. You'll need the piece of mind when you get that inevitable call "Hi gabe, you did an inspection for me a few months ago...." You stomach tightens and you will lose sleep.

    Depending on your coverage area, the time per inspection can vary greatly. Obviously newer houses can take less time. The worst seem to be 1960's and 1970's houses. They can take forever due to lack of maintenance. And really older homes can take a full day. Until you have a lot of experience you should only stick to one per day. When I start a new guy, we keep him on condo's for a while, then new(er) houses until he demonstrates the awareness to catch everything.


  44. #44
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    Default Re: First Post

    The question is .......why are you in the home inspection business? If it is all about the money, I suspect that one can do well as an HI but there are much easier ways to make the same or more IMHO. If it's about the freedom and pride of being a self employed business owner, then that is admirable.

    The reason I got into the business had to do with my other business which is real estate investment. We were flipping houses and doing the 1031 exchange to buy rental units. We were hiring other inspectors to look at the ones we were buying. I found that some things were overlooked .....and cost me some money. So I figured I'd get trained and do my own inspections. Turns out I really liked it so I set up the business and hung my shingle.

    Although I don't make great money because I spend a lot of time on each inspection, there is great satisfaction in helping people understand the systems in their home. Many are first time home buyers and they really do appreciate the input that comes from experience. A main part of my business model is that 10% of every inspection fee goes to charity. The clients even get to choose which one it will be. For me it is the satisfaction of helping people, the dollars let me do what I really like to do....


  45. #45
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    Default Re: First Post

    "Someone's finally starting to make sense on this board. I was starting to get worried about you guys. " ????

    Agreed some were less than worth reading but if you really mean that overall your either a dumb-ass or a smart-ass?? Either way you'll fit right in!!


  46. #46
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    Default Re: First Post

    I spend 3-4 hours inspecting and another 2-4 on report writing depending on how much info there is to convey. I can't seem to whittle it down much below that. I'm making money but not as much as I thought I would.

    My clients are happy with my work and refer me to their friends and family.

    A note to would be newcomers. It's not as easy as you might think. There's big liability and considerable stress at times.

    Welcome Gabe.


  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenny martin View Post
    "Someone's finally starting to make sense on this board. I was starting to get worried about you guys. " ????

    Agreed some were less than worth reading but if you really mean that overall your either a dumb-ass or a smart-ass?? Either way you'll fit right in!!
    I can be both at times.


    I was wondering about the liability that everyone keeps mentioning. If you don't mind me asking. The pre-inspection contract: does it offer any protection? Also the E&O insurance: does it completely cover your back? I mean has anybody hear paid large sums of money out of their own pockets for mistakes? By large I mean in the range of 10K-500k.


  48. #48
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    I can be both at times.


    I was wondering about the liability that everyone keeps mentioning. If you don't mind me asking. The pre-inspection contract: does it offer any protection? Also the E&O insurance: does it completely cover your back? I mean has anybody hear paid large sums of money out of their own pockets for mistakes? By large I mean in the range of 10K-500k.
    I know of 5-6 AZ inspectors that been sued or threathened to be in AZ alone in the past year.
    The sad reality of this business, you can be 100% correct, reported 100% to the standards, and still be sued.
    Many times it's not paying for what you missed, it's defending yourself if someone thinks you missed something.
    E@O insurance will help, the inspector still has to pay the deductable up front. $1-5000

    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  49. #49
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    Default Re: First Post

    The problem is that you don't get a second chance to report something. And the standards of practice appear to give you a little room, but in the end, they can make you look foolish. For example, the SOP's (from most organizations) state that only a representative number of windows will be checked. This is because a house may have furniture in the way.

    The problem is that when the new buyers move in, and discover a window does not function properly, you will likely pay for it to get repaired. You just look dumb saying "That was the only window I didn't check".

    That is a over-simplified example. Sometimes it is more complicated. You will get contractors who come in after you and throw you under the bus. They all say "Your inspector should have seen this..." It sucks.

    And missing a simple item can be costly to fix. Take for example missing a small area of dry rot in a crawl space. It is an easy thing to do. The area is dark, may be difficult to reach, etc. Now if the owner finds it he may come after you to make repairs. It is the consequential repairs that get expensive, such as replacing flooring over this area. A simple repair can cost thousands if a new floor is required.

    E&O will likely cover the big mistakes, but the standard deduction is $2,500. If you do your job well, and get the agreement signed, they should cover it. You should build a reserve of cash for buying the peace among clients, agents, or paying a deductable. Refunding the occasional fee may go further in the long run than fighting every call back.


  50. #50
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    Default Re: First Post

    I myself would not be too worried about the occasional deductible or fee return. Part of the business. I ran into it all the time in contracting where I'd spend an extra day here and there, changing something or replacing or making it look better because a customer complained about something or wasn't happy about something.

    I'd be more worried about the large lawsuits. Like 50k or 200k for a foundation problem or termite problem, or personal injury, where I can potentially lose my house. Wouln't E&O cover these?

    Also, the limited liability clauses in the contracts. Do those hold up in NY?


  51. #51
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    I myself would not be too worried about the occasional deductible or fee return. Part of the business. I ran into it all the time in contracting where I'd spend an extra day here and there, changing something or replacing or making it look better because a customer complained about something or wasn't happy about something.
    The big difference a contractor is doing a job for $5- 10, 20, plus thousand. A good contractor will build service calls, and unforseen expenses in the bid.

    A home inspector is going to a home that he's never seen, and is expected to disclose every defect for $ 2-3-400.
    Then there are some guys that will accept that liability for $149.00

    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  52. #52
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    Gabe,

    Your only liable for what the jury decides.

    That could be your home, vehicles or future income. E&O won't cover it all.

    rick


  53. #53
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    Default Re: First Post

    Can't answer the N.Y. question but can tell you your best coverage is treat your customer like family and friends. I just do it naturally but some have a bland personality or seem indifferent to their customers and that DOES increase your liability. I've been inspecting full time for 12 yrs. (though at times not so full) and have had only one lawsuit in small claims, lady was a real job, married numerous times and her mom still paid her way and was buying her $250,000 condo. Said I missed toilets that wouldn't flush and outlets were hanging out of the wall in a 7 yr. old condo!? Came to court w/ a cast on her hand and she and the woman judge chit-chatted for a few minutes while I looked in dismay and went on to make me pay $1200. You can't please the unpleasing, but anyway, people are just less likely to call you for ANYTHING if they feel you did a good thorough inspection and were keeping them and their best interest in mind.. I have done at least 4000 inspections and only had that one lawsuit, one fridge full of meat replaced (another good story) and a handful of calls but no need for repair after explaining water heaters can fail at anytime and no way to say when.. listed as marginal in report and on my way. I'm pretty sure I don't miss any majors as I'm just pretty thorough by nature but surely I've missed tons of little things others would have to fix, at least I've heard lots of stories of things having to be fixed to please.. Anyway, haven't carried E&O for 10 yrs now and happier for it..


  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    Gabe,

    Your only liable for what the jury decides.

    That could be your home, vehicles or future income. E&O won't cover it all.

    rick
    Obviously.

    I was looking more on the lines of Kenny's post. Actual stats. 4,000 inspections and one small lawsuit. Anybody else care to share?

    I guess Kenny the limited liability clause wasn't considered by the judge?


  55. #55
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    Default Re: First Post

    Actually I never made anyone sign a contract before state required licensing, guess that would have helped!? I gave a "If we miss any major defect not concealed we'll pay for it to be repaired or repair it ourselves, at own own discretion" guarantee, had it in all our ads, yellow pages etc.. still never had any problems..


  56. #56
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    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Obviously.

    I was looking more on the lines of Kenny's post. Actual stats. 4,000 inspections and one small lawsuit. Anybody else care to share?

    I guess Kenny the limited liability clause wasn't considered by the judge?
    If you search the 3 most used HI chat boards you will find a lot of stats.
    Some that come to mind, a Canada guy for $400,000.
    One guy that claims to know more than many others, claimed / bragged he's only been sued 5 times, once for every he's been in business.
    Another claimed he's has complaints on 3-4% on his inspections.

    Myself in 10 yrs and , just under 4000 insp.
    1st 2 yrs, out of apx 400 inspections, [ I thought I knew it all after the state Certified me, and after I paid for an instant on-line certificiation, and before I found this site] I paid out apx $1500 to satisify 4 complaints.

    Since then I've been driving slowley up to the house every day to see if a process service guy is there.

    Limited liabilty, Like Rick stated, if you screwed up and don't settle out of court, you most likley will be required to pay what someone else decides.

    Last edited by Dan Harris; 07-04-2010 at 12:26 PM.
    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  57. #57
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    Default Re: First Post

    I have heard a stat at a convention from an E&O provider that on avg a HI gets sued or threatened to be sued every 750 jobs. I have done better than that with only one suit that was settled out of court in close to 4000 inspections.

    Also heard a stat that a HI falls of the roof on avg every 2500 inspections. I have almost had that one happen a few times. Knock on wood, I have saved myself each time before actually going over the side.

    If it weren't for lawyers, we would never need them.

  58. #58
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    Default Re: First Post

    I agree that HI isn't anything close to what it seems like to outsiders. If a job is done right, it will take time. Probably more than you initially realized, even for veterans.

    On the other hand, every decent profession involves time, training, and a good work ethic. Take the time to learn all you can about the industry if you're truly interested. Find a mentor. Get certified. And welcome!


  59. #59
    B. Ehrlich's Avatar
    B. Ehrlich Guest

    Default Re: First Post

    I am a contract industry expert for a state agency and find that the majority of disputes that I am called to review are a result of a consumer hiring an incompetant contractor with a flawed agreement. If you are a quality, honest and experienced contractor, you will do our profession a service by continuing in the contracting business. Your good work will be a credit to you and to the business.


  60. #60
    Gabe S's Avatar
    Gabe S Guest

    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by B. Ehrlich View Post
    I am a contract industry expert for a state agency and find that the majority of disputes that I am called to review are a result of a consumer hiring an incompetant contractor with a flawed agreement. If you are a quality, honest and experienced contractor, you will do our profession a service by continuing in the contracting business. Your good work will be a credit to you and to the business.
    Loved it for the first four years. Then got sick of it. I'm the furthest thing from lazy but way too much running around and hustling. Backbreaker. Can be very stressful. And the economy in the last two years was probably the most difficult enviroment in a very long time.

    Although I shall say, that it is a very good feeling to finish a nice bathroom or kitchen and stand back and admire what you just did.


  61. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    2,445

    Default Re: First Post

    I've been in business since 1989 and completed several thousand inspection (not quite to 5 figures yet).
    I have been sued ONCE by a woman I didn't even do the inspection for.

    I have given back several thousand dollars in fees in the past 20+ years. Giving back the fee with some of them is what kept it out of court, even though I felt I was right and could have probably won in court.

    There have been a few times where I did miss something, and when I went back to follow up on the complaint, I couldn't believe I had missed it.

    I once paid to repair something that exceeded my fee. I felt that it was a valid claim and it was the right thing to do.

    I have also told some people to go piss up a rope because I wasn't at fault and they could sue me if they wanted, but I would win. It was kind of a bluff, but it worked.

    I have fired a few clients in the middle of an inspection.
    I have told a few telephone customers to find another inspector because I knew they would never be happy with me. Cut my losses.

    I have been very lucky in my career.


  62. #62
    Victoria Morris's Avatar
    Victoria Morris Guest

    Default Re: First Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Lewis View Post
    __________________________________________________ __________________________

    Sounds like you put in the time to look at everything. Good for you!

    I had one recently 5 BRs, 7 baths, office, 3 bay garage with finished basement and gourmet kitchen......10 1/2 hours in two days....about 6500 sq ft. I use the Matrix Deluxe reporting system with lots of notes on the pages and in this case gave a CD to the client with between 100-120 photos. Photos are good documentation for your inspections. This client also needed about 6-7 hours of face to face reporting time with about half on site. I also did a follow up inspection on the "repair" issues he asked for in the addendum...about another 3 hours.

    Good client relations plus good home inspection practices require time. If one is not willing to put in the time, one cannot expect to do well. My business comes through referrals, about 95% through agents. I maintain a good working relationship with them by educating them about the necessity to protect the client. If any agent thinks my inspections are too long then I really don't want to do their clients' inspections.

    Keep up the good work. I truly believe that the conscientious inspectors will take the business away from the "quick buck" guys who do the "walk through" inspections.
    Wow-that is thorough-and an excellent example of a high-end home inspection. I am basically doing low-end homes until I have a few hundred under my belt. Curious as to how much your fee was?


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