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  1. #1
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    Default Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    What would the imlplications be of inadequate venting, i.e. no soffit and/or ridge venting of cathedral roofs or just a ridge vent. Could this not cause premature aging of the roof covering if asphalt comosition shingles are utilized or even void the warranty of the shingles. A prior comment yesterday on my no soffit vent post stated that this could affect drywall as well. Any others?

    Sid

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    The biggest problem around here is moldy attics.... It's very common for installers to stuff insulation in front of the vents. Fast forward 10 years (or less in many cases) and you've got big problems.

    The other things you mention are problems as well... I've never seen any problem with drywall as a direct result but I suppose anything is possible.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by sidney alstad View Post
    What would the imlplications be of inadequate venting, i.e. no soffit and/or ridge venting of cathedral roofs or just a ridge vent. Could this not cause premature aging of the roof covering if asphalt comosition shingles are utilized or even void the warranty of the shingles. A prior comment yesterday on my no soffit vent post stated that this could affect drywall as well. Any others?

    Sid
    It depends. Not all roof assemblies necessarily require venting, or utilize ridge or sofit venting as the venting method - so the inadequate venting is not necessrialy a given.

    SIPs, SEPs, design, Moisture control, ventillators below, thermal isulation, isolation, there are many factors to consider with construction type, design, and execution. As composed, there is easy answer to your quesiton, and I propose your conclusions based upon the limitations of your prior post string on the subject to which you refer, are insufficient to form a comprehensive reply.

    You might explore topics such as "vaulted ceiling roof effects", etc.
    or "how to insulate cathedral ceilings properly". Ventillation and moisture (control within the envelope as well as barrier to the assembly) reflective qualities, color, wind exposure, installation technique, ambient temperatures, geographical region, prevailing wind direction structure orientation, all effect the performance of the roof/ceiling assembly, (including the roof finish material, i.e. compostion shingles) among many other factors.

    There are many resources you can find on the www.

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    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-18-2010 at 11:21 AM. Reason: added photo

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Thank you Mr Watson,
    NC is now requiring the DDID reporting system, and implications are required for the client. This was a stick built home with no attic, and only a ridge vent.


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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by sidney alstad View Post
    Thank you Mr Watson,
    NC is now requiring the DDID reporting system, and implications are required for the client. This was a stick built home with no attic, and only a ridge vent.
    I'm sorry, but this tells me nothing I am unfamiliar with the acronym DDID, nor your meaning of "catherdral roof" as pertains to structural design of the assembly) "log home, salt box roof" (other post), nor reference now to stick built home with no attic, nor "only a ridge vent", which in your other thread you indicated you had "friends" who installed them in a manner so as not to function. I believe you also indicated on the other post string the construction was relatively recent. Can I safely assume your "stick built" reference to mean the components are strictly and solely conventional sawn lumber, with solely on-site framing (I don't think I can, based on your intitial reference in the instant original post, to topic you began yesterday)?


    Photos of the home and roof/ceiling assembly would be helpful. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words (in this case I feel it may be worth more than that).

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-18-2010 at 11:42 AM.

  6. #6
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    I'm sorry, but this tells me nothing I am unfamiliar with the acronym DDID, nor your meaning of "catherdral roof" as pertains to structural design of the assembly) "log home, salt box roof" (other post), nor reference now to stick built home with no attic, nor "only a ridge vent", which in your other thread you indicated you had "friends" who installed them in a manner so as not to function. I believe you also indicated on the other post string the construction was relatively recent. Can I safely assume your "stick built" reference to mean the components are strictly and solely conventional sawn lumber, with solely on-site framing (I don't think I can, based on your intitial reference in the instant original post, to topic you began yesterday)?


    Photos of the home and roof/ceiling assembly would be helpful. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words (in this case I feel it may be worth more than that).

    Stick built as in piece by individual piece being cut hoisted up and all nailed together . Unlike truss type factory built in sections and delivered to the property and raised usually by some type of lift whether it be crane or fork lift of some kind.

    By the way. That sure was a pretty picture you added. I lived in a home just like that once.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    T.M.

    Yes, I know what stick means. That's why I loosely defined it in my post:
    Can I safely assume your "stick built" reference to mean the components are strictly and solely conventional sawn lumber, with solely on-site framing (I don't think I can, based on your intitial reference in the instant original post, to topic you began yesterday)?
    He referenced the "other post" wherein he described the structure as a LOG home with SALTBOX roof.

    I don't often think of log homes as being "stick built", or saltbox as a roofing type, per se. On yet another string he referenced the same home as 2008 built and in foreclosure.

    He cross referenced the same "original" post in both other subject strings.

    I know what most mean by stick built, I just don't believe that is what the OP is necessarily discussing.

    I would expect a 2008 built log home to be just that a log home, and either timber framed or truss roof, especially with a vaulted ceiling. If not - I'd expect BEAMS at least at the ridge. This is why I asked the OP. I admit I am NOT SURE WHAT HE MEANS.

    Thanks.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-18-2010 at 04:38 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by sidney alstad View Post
    Thank you Mr Watson,
    NC is now requiring the DDID reporting system, and implications are required for the client. This was a stick built home with no attic, and only a ridge vent.
    What is a DDID reporting system?

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Done Did I Do'ed it? ... Done Did I'd Dentified?

    Seriously, I think it may be a report formulae: Description, Determination, Implication, Direction for each defect reported, but I'm not sure.

    Perhaps another of the NC HIs can enlighten us?

    Dat's why I done did asked before'un.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-18-2010 at 06:08 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    DDID is what the state wants us to follow for report writing.
    Describe, Determine, Implication, Direction

    Mike Schulz License 393
    Affordable Home Inspections
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  11. #11
    David Valley's Avatar
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Long ago I remember removing a drywalled vaulted ceiling that was black at the peak. When I put my hand up and in to pull down the sheetrock, I literally burned my fingers. That was probably the worst case scenario of improper venting.
    In a regular attic with optimum insulation, theres a good chance that no problems will be noted other than high heat levels. And the deterioration of shingles has been pretty well debunked by now.
    And DDID sucks. That's just my opinion. It's part of the dumbing down of America. Explain in writing why a rotten window sill is a bad idea.

    jlmathis


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey L. Mathis View Post
    And the deterioration of shingles has been pretty well debunked by now.

    It has? Would you lead me to all the research and data which shows that?

    Then why do we see so many failures due to heat in improperly (and non-vented but supposed to be vented) attics?

    Supposedly ... the data shows that using a radiant barrier on the underside of the roof sheathing does not affect the life of the shingles, but that is entirely different than improperly vented attic.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Who said there even was an attic? I don't believe that was ever established.


  15. #15
    Jim McMillan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Implications of no soffit vent at cathedral roofs

    Mr. Mathis may be missing the intent of DDID. The NC Licensed Home Inspector Board's intent is for each client of a Licensed Home Inspector, through our inspection and reporting process, to have a better understanding of the property that is being inspected, and to be educated on the materials, construction, deficiencies, etc. that are relevant to the property. Following the process of DDID is intended to enhance the education process, and to bring some similarity of all reports used in NC. Unlike inspectors, contractors, subs, etc. that are involved in businesses that require an understanding of construction the average home owner has very limited knowledge of what a house really is and what can happen to it. Being able to convey this information to a client in a logical and simple manner is one of the reasons NC adopted this addition to our reporting requirements. Yes, you might say that "it sucks" because it does create a longer report and it does require an inspector to have a reasonable ability of writing and conveying this information in the report versus using a simple checklist. But the intent of DDID is for the customer to be better informed - something that we should all be concerned about. And this post is representative of a home inspector asking the questions that will allow him to do just that - better inform his client. Thanks to this site for having participants that can almost always provide answers to queries that we HI's have from time to time.


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