Results 1 to 26 of 26
  1. #1
    Larry Hood's Avatar
    Larry Hood Guest

    Default Insulation at lightcans

    If CFL bulbs are used in recessed light fixtures is it okay to cover the unrated "can" with fire rated blow-in insulation.

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Insulation at recessed light housings

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Hood View Post
    If CFL bulbs are used in recessed light fixtures is it okay to cover the unrated "can" with fire rated blow-in insulation.
    No.

    Additionally, it is not appropriate to use CFL lamps in recessed lights which were not rated for them either (although I suspect the CFL put out enough less heat that it is more of a listing/labeling problem than an actual overheating problem, even considering that the heat is trapped in the recessed housing and not reflected out as would have been designed for the normal incandescent lamps listed on the recessed housing).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    If the fixture is not rated then there wouldn't seem to be much of a way of knowing what you could and couldn't do with it.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  4. #4
    Guy W Opie's Avatar
    Guy W Opie Guest

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    CFL's can be used in cans provided that the correct CFL is selected. Read the package foe correct application


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    S.W. Missouri
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    From my point of view. The short answer is NO.
    There is nothing stopping some yuts from removing the CFL and installing a 150 watt bulb and burning the place down.


  6. #6
    Guy W Opie's Avatar
    Guy W Opie Guest

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Tha n the same ogic would apply if someone removed a 65 watt br 30 or par 40 and installed a 90 or 150 watt flood. Most recessed cans, the correct bulb application is based on type of trim. There are cfl's made for recessed cans


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Larry, if you need to insulate a can a cover can be made very easily out of a sonar tube.

    Two methods are to either cut a 12-14 inch tube in half and cover the can or cut it to length and make a circular cover and fasten it to the top using aluminum tape.

    Both ways are effective and inexpensive.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,217

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Do not insulate the top of a can enclosure (if you install one).

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  9. #9
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
    chris mcintyre Guest

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Russell View Post
    Larry, if you need to insulate a can a cover can be made very easily out of a sonar tube.

    Two methods are to either cut a 12-14 inch tube in half and cover the can or cut it to length and make a circular cover and fasten it to the top using aluminum tape.

    Both ways are effective and inexpensive.

    The difference between IC and non-IC fixtures is a sensor that opens the circuit when overheating occurs so I do not think covering the fixture is a good idea.....in fact if I was going to violate the listing of the fixture I would take my chances with the non-combustible insulation over the cardboard.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Insulation at light cans

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Russell View Post
    Larry, if you need to insulate a can a cover can be made very easily out of a sonar tube.

    Two methods are to either cut a 12-14 inch tube in half and cover the can or cut it to length and make a circular cover and fasten it to the top using aluminum tape.

    Both ways are effective and inexpensive.
    Peter,

    BAD IDEA. WORSE RECOMMENDATION.

    The following bold red highlighting in the below deserves repeating, and NO ONE should be suggesting that anyone insulate a recessed light fixture housing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Breedlove View Post
    Do not insulate the top of a can enclosure (if you install one).
    Quote Originally Posted by chris mcintyre View Post
    The difference between IC and non-IC fixtures is a sensor that opens the circuit when overheating occurs so I do not think covering the fixture is a good idea.....in fact if I was going to violate the listing of the fixture I would take my chances with the non-combustible insulation over the cardboard.
    If the recessed light fixture is a non-IC rated recessed light - DO NOT insulate, enclose, cover, or allow ANY combustible material within 3 inches of the recessed light fixture housing, and (I repeat) DO NOT cover the housing either.

    If the recessed light fixture is an IC rated recessed light, then the insulation may be right next to, and cover, the recessed light - those IC rated recessed lights are made to be installed that way, and, as Chris said, there is a sensor which shuts the light off before it overheats and causes a fire.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  11. #11
    Guy W Opie's Avatar
    Guy W Opie Guest

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    The last post by Jerry is 100% correct


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    " or allow ANY combustible material within 3 inches of "

    Sorry for the incomplete post. I should have mentioned that you need at least three inches clearance.

    I also should have said " if you have to insulate over a recessed can "


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Exclamation Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Even those dopes at the IRC got it wrong by discussing how to enclose a non-IC fixture with a box made of ductboard.

    To clarify once again: Do NOT enclose a non-IC luminaire by any method. They have to breathe to dump heat. If you find non-IC fixtures in an attic, I suggest you recommend they be replaced with ICAT fixtures. This will update those fixtures to the present code, save energy, make rooms more comfortable and not burn the house down. I saw 6 packs of ICATs at the big Orange Box for $59.

    The ICST has a gasket to the ceiling, reduced wattage and a high limit self-resetting heat sensor. If the subject home ever has an energy audit done, these cans will surely need to be upgraded to ICAT anyway.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Hi Bob, thanks for your input. I would like to point out that this procedure is done every day by weatherization contractors.

    This is from National Fibers Technical bulletin.

    Technical Bulletin on Cellulose Insulation and
    Chimneys, Vents and Recessed Lights
    National Fiber’s cellulose insulation products should never be installed in direct contact with any
    combustion appliance chimney, vent or flue pipe, nor against or over any non-IC (Insulated Contact)
    rated recessed light housings or fixtures.
    Most fire codes mandate a minimum two-inch space between combustible materials and masonry
    chimneys, some types of triple-wall vent pipe, and certain insulated metal vents, such as MetalBest®
    brand products. For single-wall vent pipe, these minimum clearances to combustible materials
    increase substantially to 18 inches. For double-wall vents, these clearances are typically reduced to 9
    inches for ‘Type L’ oil and solid fuel vent, and 6 inches for gas ‘B Vent’. (Always consult
    manufacturer’s recommendations and regional building codes for specific usage and regulations
    requirements.)
    For non-IC (Insulated Contact) rated recessed light fixtures, the minimum clearance to combustible
    materials is typically three inches. Any recessed light fixture not identified as ‘IC’ on its housing should
    not be considered rated for insulation contact. Airtight enclosures attaining these minimum clearances
    can be fabricated from drywall, Sonotubes®, etc., and air-sealed to the attic floor over non-IC rated
    fixtures, allowing cellulose insulation to be blown around these fixtures. NFPA 70 does not allow
    insulation to be installed over non IC-rated fixtures, so the enclosures should be built high enough
    such that insulation does not cover them. The most energy efficient fixtures will be rated ‘IC Airtight’.

    If you subscribe to the journal of Light Construction there is an article this month on how to air seal and cover non- rated cans.



    This is from the State of NH weatherization SOP.

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    This (Peter's representations of what he intreprets the NH and insulation mfg bulletin stuff) sounds extremely and inherently dangerous and liability prone (and potentially voiding HO policy indemnification in the event of loss) to me.

    It would also seem somewhat obvious that one modifying an existing installation in the manner you promote would likely be liable and I can't imagine an insurer covering such actions/activities - it defies the standards for safety for listing such devices over the years, the building codes, the electric code, not to mention myriad fire investigations which led to changes in the listing standard(s), electric code, building codes, etc. over the decades.

    From the jpg file you posted, supposedly SOP from the NH weatherization program, there is nothing in that page that indicates or supports what you were representing Peter. A suitable insulation GUARD at proper clearances from the sides of sufficient height is mentioned, but nothing indicating anything over the TOP of same, and nothing about insulating over the top of any sort of closure above the non-IC rated fixture is mentioned. I further note it indicates electrical system and other remediation is to be done by a qualified individual prior to the insulation/weatherization work.

    As far as the PDF file from a cellulose manufacturer that you posted, the opening paragraph says plainly:

    National Fiber's cellulose insulation products should never be installed in direct contact with any combustion appliance chimney, vent or flue pipe, nor against or over any non-IC (Insulated Contact) (sic) rated recessed light housings or fixtures.

    ... (Always consult manufacturer's recommendations and regional building codes for specific usage and regulations requirements.)

    For non-IC (Insulated Contact) (sic) rated recessed light fixtures, the minimum clearance to combustible is typically three inches. Any recessed light fixture not identified as 'IC' on its housing should not be considered rated for insulation contact...

    NFPA 70 does not allow insulation to be installed over non IC-rated fixtures, so the enclosures should be built high enough that insulation does not cover them.
    There is NO support for what they say in between about what "can" be done. I can stick a needle in my eye, that doesn't mean I should do it, it also doesn't mean I may do it intentionally and expect my medical insurance to indemnify me or my disability insurance - if I did it on purpose (intentional self inflicted injury) it will not.


    This sentance really tipped me off as being totally off the mark:

    "for energy efficiency and fire safety reasons, chimney chases should not be left open, but should be air-sealed with metal flashiing and high temperature caulk".

    I'll be reaching out to "National Fiber" at technical@nationalfiber.com and looking for this "Technical Manager, Bill Hulstrunk", and finding out WTheck this NUT was thinking when this "thing" was put together, I'll also be asking WHEN this thing was authored, if it was intended for circulation, and if it has been since recalled becuase this overall one page document is full of incomplete, unsafe, incorrect, contrary to codes, experience, and UL listings, certifications, standards, etc. and should NOT be relied upon. Some of what is stated is inherently unsafe, but is so full of double talk and backpeddling it could likely be backpeddled in a court.

    Note its close:

    Minimum clearances to combustible materials are dictacted by the manufacturer and your local code requirements. These codes may be more stringent in certain jurisdictions.
    Not complete either, and erroneously suggestive that any of the above DIY type site fabricated, by the unqualified, in his document is acceptable anywhere in the lower 48. It is not. A specified floor/ceiling assembly may well be in place, specifications beyond code are often indicated by engineers, architects, planners, designators. Its not just ONE manufacturer, or code area that must be addressed with this crud being suggested in this so-called "technical bulletin".

    Hmmm. 50 Deport Street, Belchertown, MA 01007 (800) 282-7711, National Fiber: Professional Cellulose for Cellulose Professionals this I'm looking into.

    Older homes with 60C (or less!) wiring such as TW, old Romex, etc. non-metallic conduit, without a heat sink whip, and enclosing airtight and insulating (that gyp box is further insulating) in an unconditioned attic, especially insulating over the TOP of the box an UNLISTED as IC and/or AT fixture of UNKNOWN age, with house wiring of UNKNOWN age, could be prone to overheating of the conductors, the insulation, and a host of other potential failures/problems. Now you have an item insulated, air tight, not quite contained within the thermal envelope (electric system wiring and "box" is within the insulation) in an unconditioned attic subject to extreme temperature swings (when working electricity and heat producing - and when not working electricity and the attic is cold, or cool humid dew point in summer, etc.) now you've got a worse environment for unknown vintage electrical wiring then before!

    With such replacement fixtures both AT and IC rated and listed, available for MINIMAL cost, and replacing with SO VERY MUCH LESS EFFORT AND EXPENSE than constructing this "box" which when endeavoring to do so you are modifying the existing ceiling/floor assembly of the attic - is IMHO downright silly, and somehow I suspect the way Peter is representing (insulating over the TOP of this "box") isn't quite what the "program" document authors intended (as in violate existing construction and modify an existing previously listed or approved (just not IC or AT) formerly classified "light fixture" in a manner not consistant with its original manufacturer's instructions or listing (at the time it was manufactured), or to create an Unlisted communication into a separation and structural assembly.

    Since the "scenerio" is already that the "zone" is EXPOSED (for it would have to be to be able to construct this "box" in the first place) it would seem more prudent to reroute exising wiring to a metallic Junction box, and from there install 90 degrees C wiring "whip" or "Pigtail" with metallic protection to the NEW, CHEAP AT and IC rated replacment Cans (as already indicated one can acquire a packaged set of six of these for under $12 ea.). Obviously if K & T additional remediation would be necessary before insulating anyway.

    I'm curious if NH has a statewide adoption of a Property Maintenance Code applicable to single family residences, and the other code adoptions and ammendments applicable; but alas, I'm not curious enough to look it up.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 01-19-2011 at 04:20 PM.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    I would like ti reiterate, these are not my standards but those of the State of NH, weatherization program, National Fiber, cellulose manufacture and if you care to read, the Journal of Light Construction.


    H.G. with all your wisdom, perhaps you can enlighten us on the proper method to air seal an attic in preparation for blown in insulation. Up here the normal amount is 16 inches.

    Also, when cost are discussed the purchase of the cans are relatively inexpensive but the installation/upgrade is usually cost prohibitive, especially in regard to ARRA funded weatherization.

    As I said, this is not my opinion, these are the standards that are followed by the oldest weatherization groups in the country and this installation is performed daily.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Exclamation Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Peter, I prefer to quote from the 2009 IRC, which is in force in much of the country and is gaining widespread acceptance as the new national building code.
    E4004.9 Recessed luminaire installation. Thermal insulation shall not be installed above a recessed luminaire or within 3 inches of the recessed luminaire's enclosure, wiring compartment of ballast except where such luminaire is identified for contact with insulation, type IC.

    N1102.4.5 recessed lighting. Recessed luminaires installed in the building thermal envelope shall be sealed to limit air leakage between the conditioned and unconditioned spaces. All recessed luminaires shall be IC rated and labeled as meeting ASTM E-283 when tested at 1.57 psi( 75Ps) pressure differentialwith no more than 2/0 cfm of air movement from the conditioned spaceto the ceiling cavity. All recessed luminaires shall be sealed with a gasket or caulk between the housing and the interior wall or ceiling covering.

    Sounds pretty clear to me. Shall not be means mandatory--not optional. According to the IRC, non ICAT luminaires are not approved. Now, since you are doing repairs and remodeling, any new work must comply with the present code. As soon as you disturb those old non-IC cans, you trigger the current code, which would require you replace those old cans. As noted, the cost to replace these cans is not all that much compared to field fabrication and installation of insulated enclosures. Even when you construct a box of ductboard or rigid foam, you fail to meet the code R-value requirement over that spot. If you install tubes or homemade insulation dams that remain open at the top, you are still in violation of the code and as I noted but you also would fail. You also have-
    N1102.4.1 Buidling thermal envelope. .... shall be durably sealed to limit air infiltration.....The following shall be caulked, gasketed, weatherstripped, or otherwise sealed with an air barrier material, suitable film or solid material:
    1.All joints, seams, and penetrations.

    You also quoted the NEC, which prohibits covering non-IC cans. If you install an insulation dam then blow the attic, you must go back and inspect each dam to ensure no insulation got blown in over the top. FYI, most venting mfrs now make listed attic insulation shields.

    Just to be clear, you cannot fill firestops around masonry chimneys with insulation--stated clearances are air spaces.

    So, in order to comply with the code, you must seal the ceiling/attic. To do that, you must remove all non-IC cans and replace them with ICATs--period. I see no other legal alternative except not to have light fixtures penetrating the ceiling into an attic.

    Standards are nice but the code is law. Just because a std. has been around for awhile doesn't make it right. If you disturb non-IC cans in any way, you must replace then with ICATs. If you try to install dams around non-IC cans, you cannot by law cover those dams. If you do not cover those dams, you are in violation of the law.

    Anybody publicly stating they have been tampering with non-ICAT cans is guilty of self incrimination. Any program espousing these practices that violate the code are negligent.

    If the cans are not being changed to ICATs due to insufficient funding by ARRA or anybody else (HomeStar for ex.), then this decision is being made not due to the code, mfrs. requirements, or fire safety but for economic reasons.

    FYI, the clearance on B-vent is 1"--not 6", which is the clearance for CAT. I gas vent single walled vent connector.

    Yes Peter, I read the JLC and their chat forums online. I read the IRC, too. :-)
    HTH,

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Russell View Post
    "I also should have said " if you have to insulate over a recessed can "
    Peter,

    "insulate over a recessed can"

    That is what we keep responding too - DO NOT "insulate over a recessed can", unless (of course) it is an IC (insulated ceiling) rated recessed light.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    This (Peter's representations of what he intreprets the NH and insulation mfg bulletin stuff) sounds extremely and inherently dangerous and liability prone (and potentially voiding HO policy indemnification in the event of loss) to me.

    It would also seem somewhat obvious that one modifying an existing installation in the manner you promote would likely be liable and I can't imagine an insurer covering such actions/activities - it defies the standards for safety for listing such devices over the years, the building codes, the electric code, not to mention myriad fire investigations which led to changes in the listing standard(s), electric code, building codes, etc. over the decades.

    From the jpg file you posted, supposedly SOP from the NH weatherization program, there is nothing in that page that indicates or supports what you were representing Peter. A suitable insulation GUARD at proper clearances from the sides of sufficient height is mentioned, but nothing indicating anything over the TOP of same, and nothing about insulating over the top of any sort of closure above the non-IC rated fixture is mentioned.
    This needs repeating so that no one misses it again:
    NFPA 70 does not allow insulation to be installed over non IC-rated fixtures, so the enclosures should be built high enough such that insulation does not cover them



    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Yes Jerry, I need to clarify that statement, you are correct, do not insulate over the enclosure.

    I do disagree with Bob. Just because your insulating an attic it does not mean the lighting has to be brought up to code.

    Next time I post here I'll make sure I make my statements clearer. Thanks for the civil replies.


  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Near Philly, Pa.
    Posts
    1,643

    Smile Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Peter, I think the issue is, you're either modifying the installation of the orig. non-IC can with a covered dam or you're failing to meet the code and not sealing known bypasses.

    Let me re-state it this way: If you do not cover the dams around those old leaky cans, you do nothing to seal a major source of air leaks, albeit, usually exfiltrative leaks. I've tested enough homes to see that replacing non-IC cans was enough to cure smoking fireplaces.

    Good discussion and I appreciate your perspective, esp. from one in the trenches so to speak.
    Thx,

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    "DO NOT "insulate over a recessed can", unless (of course) it is an IC (insulated ceiling) rated recessed light.:"

    Should that read "Insulation contact"?

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Alton Bay NH
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Hi Bob, first let me say thank you for your civil replies. Open discussions are a great way to learn and I'm only trying to offer some ways that air sealing an attic with recessed lighting is done, from my experience.

    Here is another example, scroll down to almost the end where it talks about Chimney chases. Someone had mentioned that it's not a good practice and I don't think they were clear on air sealing a chimney chase in the attic. We use heavy sheet metal, bent in a L shape, it must be attached to the floor frame and then up the side of the chimney, then high temperature caulk around the perimeter.

    Scroll down further and you can see an example of how to enclose a recessed can using drywall. This is similar to the way I was trying to explain using the sonar tube. This example recommends replacing the bulb as well.

    Most of the time you won't run into this problem because the client will see the value in replacing the lights with IC rated one's but there are always time's when you do, such as, doing weatherization funded by the state or federal government where replacing non IC rated cans is not an option.

    By the way, in my area the cost for a licensed electrician to replace one can is about $125.00 so if you have a dozen of them the cost can add up quickly.

    And, I would like to say once more that I retracted my statement about insulating over the top. DO NOT!!!!!


    Here is the link for the Building Science Corp/air sealing attics

    Attic Air Sealing Guide and Details — Building Science Information sealing attics

    You will have to open the PDF, not sure how to upload a PDF file to this site.


  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Insulation at lightcans

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    "DO NOT "insulate over a recessed can", unless (of course) it is an IC (insulated ceiling) rated recessed light.:"

    Should that read "Insulation contact"?
    .
    No.
    .

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Omaha
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Insulation at recessed light housings

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    No.

    Additionally, it is not appropriate to use CFL lamps in recessed lights which were not rated for them either (although I suspect the CFL put out enough less heat that it is more of a listing/labeling problem than an actual overheating problem, even considering that the heat is trapped in the recessed housing and not reflected out as would have been designed for the normal incandescent lamps listed on the recessed housing).
    Jerry

    I would see no problems from using a CFL. It has lower heat and lower power requirements. From a heat loss standpoint a home would lose less heat through the light as less heat and air is pulled up through it and out of the attic.


    Larry

    Do not cover a non IC light with insulation. They are ways to insulate in around the light. There are boxes you can buy to install over them that keep the required air space. You can also make you own enclosure but need to keep a 3 inch air space. Some of the older non IC lights do not have a heat limit switch that will shutoff the light if it gets to hot. Because of this I dont really think it is a good idea to put boxes around them.

    If you are handy them I think it would be better to install new air tight IC ligths.

    Since you are thinking of insulating around the lights I am assuming you are looking to save money on your heating and cooling bills. Without air sealing around the lights they would be very little saving from doing it. It may be a feel good project but of no real benefit.

    Now if you are looking at energy efficiency and are doing it as part of a larger project encompassing the aittic then I suggest you learn about air leaks and sealing the leaks. Studies show that adding more insulation to a leaky attic does not give the benefit that you think you should be getting.

    Air sealing + insualtion is the key. Air sealing can be tedious work but is not hard or expensive.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •