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  1. #1

    Default Does this look right to you?

    Hi everyone,

    These Photos are of a fink style truss system on a house that was constructed in 1999. Only three or four of the top chords were cut at the mid span with no latteral support on iether side of the gusset plates. These cut chords are all in a row beneath an area of the metal roof that has recently been patched. The ceiling beneath this section of the attic has water stains/damage. Please offer any opinions.

    Thanks,

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    It would be a Fink if it had the cross V supports at the gussetted cut. This is a joint scabbed with a gusset and so the short answer to your question is "No".

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    George, are there webs just out of sight in those shots?
    I used to get concerned about scabbed splices like that on masnufactured trusses, but have learned to accept them. If the webs are there and there is no sag, that is the way they came from the shop.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    George, are there webs just out of sight in those shots?
    I used to get concerned about scabbed splices like that on masnufactured trusses, but have learned to accept them. If the webs are there and there is no sag, that is the way they came from the shop.
    I agree with John.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    George, are there webs just out of sight in those shots?
    I used to get concerned about scabbed splices like that on masnufactured trusses, but have learned to accept them. If the webs are there and there is no sag, that is the way they came from the shop.
    It's hard to see that kind of joint taking much of a snow load, but if I am wrong, then I've learned something as I usually do everyday.

    And I suppose snow load isn't much of a concern in Mississippi but I thought Vancouver got some snow.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lon Henderson View Post
    It would be a Fink if it had the cross V supports at the gussetted cut. This is a joint scabbed with a gusset and so the short answer to your question is "No".
    Lon,
    The roofing system as a whole is what I am describing as a Fink truss system. Actually it is a combination of both a Fink and a Howe truss system most of the other framing members have the webbing however, the pictured chords do not have any webbing attached along the entire span of these members. that is what was throwing me off. It did appear to be "scabbed" joints.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    George, are there webs just out of sight in those shots?
    I used to get concerned about scabbed splices like that on masnufactured trusses, but have learned to accept them. If the webs are there and there is no sag, that is the way they came from the shop.
    John,
    Yes there is webbing on other chords, just not on those particular ones. These members appear to span about 12' from top plate to ridge with no web support. The house in question is a site built home. There is no sagging but the issue that gave me pause is that the metal roofing above the spliced members has recently been replaced/patched, and the ceiling area beneath the area in question is water dammaged and there is a fresh cut tree stump outside near the patched roof section. all of that combined led me to believe that it may be an improper repair job. With findings like these, this is exactly why Inspection News is such a valuable resource.

    Keep the opinions comming.

    Thanks,

    George Hallaron: Owner primary inspector
    Bienvenue Home Inspections LLC
    www.bienvenuehomeinspections.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Detective work in this biz is fun. I had a home a few months ago where I found how a tree had fallen against the house and rolled to the patio cover.

    So, it sounds like you are suspicious that a tree fell and knocked a hole in the roof and perhaps damaged the trusses in the photo. It's pretty tough to apply gussets in situ. I've done it and it takes some pretty major pounding and they never look as pretty as done on the jigs at the plant. The photos look like "from the plant" trusses. It looks like all they did was replace the damaged roof section and the underlying rafter chord is unchanged.

    I still don't think much of scabbing a joint that way. I don't think I've seen an unsupported joint in a truss like that around here. It kind of reminds me of the times I've picked up a long finger jointed 2X4 by one end and watched them break at the first finger joint by my hands.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by George Hallaron View Post
    Lon,
    The roofing system as a whole is what I am describing as a Fink truss system. Actually it is a combination of both a Fink and a Howe truss system most of the other framing members have the webbing however, the pictured chords do not have any webbing attached along the entire span of these members. that is what was throwing me off. It did appear to be "scabbed" joints.


    John,
    Yes there is webbing on other chords, just not on those particular ones. These members appear to span about 12' from top plate to ridge with no web support. The house in question is a site built home. There is no sagging but the issue that gave me pause is that the metal roofing above the spliced members has recently been replaced/patched, and the ceiling area beneath the area in question is water damaged and there is a fresh cut tree stump outside near the patched roof section. all of that combined led me to believe that it may be an improper repair job. With findings like these, this is exactly why Inspection News is such a valuable resource.

    Keep the opinions coming.

    Thanks,
    OK, there may be a problem there. Without a web to hold the top chord up, any downward force is on that splice.

    With a web there, one section is propped up, can't move, and the lower section hangs from it, that would be a standard truss design.

    The strapping is helping to keep things straight. So there are factors at play there that might be alright, or maybe not. That's helpful, huh?

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Twelve foot span of the top cord with no webbing? The webs are what reduce the clear span of the lumber. 2X6 SPF just barley gets to 12' at 12" spacing, so how could 2x4 be ok for that span?

    My guess is the repairs were made using a porta-power press to install the plates. I've tried to hammer them in but it doesn't work. As you hammer in one side the other backs out and they never hold, you have to use a press.

    I would recommend further evaluation by engineer.

    Just looked at the pic's again, those aren't 2x6 on 12" centers are they? I f so, why to the other trusses have webbing? Splice is wrong regardless.

    Last edited by Vern Heiler; 01-30-2013 at 09:03 PM. Reason: Second look
    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Does this look right to you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vern Heiler View Post

    My guess is the repairs were made using a porta-power press to install the plates..
    I never used or saw a porta-power press. The boss said, "You're a smart kid, you'll get it done." I took a sledge and held it on the back side and used my framing hammer to beat the plates in. It worked, but was not pretty.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

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