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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    89

    Default Is this just sap?

    House built in 1958 with rafters. This looks like sap to me but thought I would call for second opinions.
    sap.jpg

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Is this just sap?

    Is this just sap?

    Yes.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Timmins
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Is this just sap?

    Yes just sap. You can also tell the "slope of grain" by this leakage. I'd have to look it up but I think it's like 1-in10 or something. If you measure 10 inches down the board, the grain cannot be off more then 1 inch in a # 1 grade. In an older house (ex. 1958), chances are, the rafters would have split by now but in new construction I usually pay more attention. I know as inspectors, this goes beyond the scope but Inspections are an never ending learning process.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: Is this just sap?

    Another "Yes". Not a problem and in a few million years, might even be droplets of amber. Did you see any mosquitoes entombed in a drop? Just wonderin'.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Hercules, CA
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: Is this just sap?

    I'm curious, is this grade stamped lumber? I am not an expert in lumber grading, but the wood probably qualifies as #3 or stud grade, which makes very poor rafter material.

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Timmins
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Is this just sap?

    The laws may have changed a little but it used to be for rafters, each piece had to be stamped #1, and only about 10 or 20 % was allowed to be #2 grade in the system as a whole. When I look at framing lumber I look for the slope of the grain first and then large knots, spike knots and knot clusters. A bunch of small little knots is good, it actually strenghtens the piece but any knots taking up 1/4 of the piece or more are starting to affect the piece. In the picture Tom put up, the rafters look in good condition. I'd move on to the next component......


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