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Thread: Insulation type

  1. #1
    Jeff Eastman's Avatar
    Jeff Eastman Guest

    Default Insulation type

    Last edited by Jeff Eastman; 12-19-2007 at 02:11 PM.
    OREP Home Inspector E&O Insurance 2

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    25,314

    Default Re: Insulation type

    First, the facing is not supposed to be left exposed - danger for fire.

    Next, looks like daylight is visible beyond, is there a skylight back there?

    Could have been someones idea of a draft stop wall (good idea to install a draft stop wall - very poor execution if that it what they thought they were doing ... ain't gonna work).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Insulation type

    "Or....did someone install it after the fact for some unknown reason."

    That seems to be the case... no vapor barrier of any known batt-type I know of.

    Rich


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Insulation type

    Jeff,

    So, the daylight being seen is from a soffit vent? Along a rake? (Gable end.)

    Was there a 'soffit' there, such as, was that over a kitchen area which had a dropped ceiling?

    If so, then the vertical side would also need to be insulated, as would the top of the part behind the insulation shown.

    That plastic facing will also burn and should not be left exposed.

    Kraft paper facing, foil facing, plastic facing, none of those facings should be left exposed as they all will burn.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Tim Moreira's Avatar
    Tim Moreira Guest

    Default Re: Insulation type

    If that is facing a soffit/gable end rake/vent...why would you want to have a draft stop wall?

    Wouldn't that negate the purpose of the vents?


  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Insulation type

    They don't even need insulation along that wall. I agree with everyone else about the placement of the batt facing.

    To everyone, it would be a big help is EVERYONE would place their location, on their profile or on their signature line. It really helps folks to know a persons location when a they are asking for help.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Insulation type

    Jeff,

    If it's just a gable end, then it's un-needed ... no, it's more than that, it's creating a hazard with no benefit to offset the hazard.

    I thought I saw daylight at the light area, but when I enlarged the photo, it was just (looks like to me) the edge of gypsum board being used for the soffit. Hopefully, the gypsum board is the proper board for that purpose, you don't want just regular old gypsum board there.

    Regardless, though, as Scott said "They don't even need insulation along that wall.", not with it just being a gable end wall.

    Tim,

    "If that is facing a soffit/gable end rake/vent...why would you want to have a draft stop wall?"

    If it was, and it is (a gable end wall), you would not need a draft stop wall there.

    When you break the attic space up into 3,000 sf maximum areas and build a draftstop wall to serve as the wall which breaks those spaces up, then you build the wall where it best fits from ceiling to roof. If the attic, including the soffit overhang area, is just over 3,000 sf, you could (I've seen it done) have to install a draftstop wall which just separates off a small area, once that small area was only 1 foot wide by 50 feet long. It would have been more productive, and easier to build, if that draftstop wall had been located out toward the center of the house where the attic jumped up to go up and over a higher ceiling. One of those 'Duh.' moments the builder probably never even had (but should have had).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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