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  1. #1
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    Default Shed framing tied into trusses.

    Shed type porch cover, stick framed and tied into the sides of top truss cords with nails only. This doesn't look right to me. Shouldn't the conventional stick over framing be self supporting or at least have purlin and brace where it is tied into the truss framing?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    Looks to me like the conventional framing has a vertical load bearing member going down to the same place as the adjacent truss bears - on the exterior front wall.

    The other end of the conventional framed porch roof looks like it bears on the beam bearing on the posts.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Looks to me like the conventional framing has a vertical load bearing member going down to the same place as the adjacent truss bears - on the exterior front wall.

    The other end of the conventional framed porch roof looks like it bears on the beam bearing on the posts.
    That is a web member that is only supported by the bottom cord of the truss (no wall beneath). The front edge of the porch cover does not give me concern, having that much roof area supported by nails in the side of the top cord of a truss does. Heavy snow followed by warm rain could put a lot of weight on that porch cover. Would I be out of line to call for engineer?

    Just looked again at what you are saying. There is a vertical support near the center of the rafter. My concern is at the top of the rafter.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    If the porch rafters bear on the verticals at the front wall they are carrying much of the load. Nailing to the trusses is probably fine in this case, but generally not the best practice.

    Someone might argue that you are putting a point load on the top chord of the truss not at a panel point, but with the small load and the fact that the end of the rafter is close to a panel point, I would not be concerned.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Reinmiller View Post
    If the porch rafters bear on the verticals at the front wall they are carrying much of the load. Nailing to the trusses is probably fine in this case, but generally not the best practice.

    Someone might argue that you are putting a point load on the top chord of the truss not at a panel point, but with the small load and the fact that the end of the rafter is close to a panel point, I would not be concerned.
    Ok,
    Thanks Mark & Jerry

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Bozeman, Montana
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    Vern,
    Are the vertical framing members meant to support the rafters fastened to the side of the rafter not directly bearing the load? If they are directly bearing the load they ought to be gusseted in place.....and rollover blocking (help contain the insulation)...hurricane ties.....is the sheathing upside down? don't see any trade mark, size info. If so, one slippery roof.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    The porch rafters could have been a foot longer and nailed, screwed or bolted to the truss webs.
    The rafters could have been cut to rest on the top chords of the trusses and attached to them with plywood gussets on each side.
    That makes me wonder if an engineer was involved at all.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  8. #8
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    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    I don't see a problem.

    If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Lansdale, PA
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    Default Re: Shed framing tied into trusses.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    The porch rafters could have been a foot longer and nailed, screwed or bolted to the truss webs.
    The rafters could have been cut to rest on the top chords of the trusses and attached to them with plywood gussets on each side.
    That makes me wonder if an engineer was involved at all.
    An engineer is seldom involved with projects like this. However, with the small loads involved, this is not much of an issue. Could have been better, but with anything more than one nail it will be fine. Of more concern with porches is that many columns are not attached to the slab, so uplift from high winds can be a bigger concern.


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