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Thread: Attic issues

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Antonio TX
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    88

    Default Attic issues

    Last edited by Zibby Swieca; 11-16-2011 at 10:01 AM.
    Certified Master Inspector CMI

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Lake Barrington, IL
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    1,363

    Default Re: Attic issues

    Most likely (no doubt in my mind) that the truss top chord is not designed for the weight placed on it. Engineer should evaluate. Do you know if the dimensional lumber was installed after the building was constructed?

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    San Antonio TX
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    Default Re: Attic issues

    Thanks

    Last edited by Zibby Swieca; 11-16-2011 at 10:02 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Philadelphia PA
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    Default Re: Attic issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Zibby Swieca View Post
    Thanks
    But what is dimensional lumber.
    He's referring to the standard 2X6, 2X8, etc. boards, as opposed to engineered trusses and such.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Attic issues

    Quote Originally Posted by John Arnold View Post
    ... as opposed to engineered trusses and such.
    Which are made of pieces of dimensional lumber.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Mike Truss Guy's Avatar
    Mike Truss Guy Guest

    Default Re: Attic issues

    In non-snow load areas, especially prior to the adoption of higher design loading in IBC, it was customary to specify a toe-nailed connection for jack trusses up to about an 8' span. The jacks can be trusses or they can be conventional framing. You can not see the nails from the back side, you would need to see them from the front face. If there are nails then it was probably adequate for the code when it was built.

    It's a bit unusual to see 2x6 jack framing with 2x4 trusses, but there's nothing wrong with that. Also note that the flat 2x6 purlin laid on the top is also a customary practice for bracing the flat top chord.

    Have a great day.


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