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  1. #1
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    Default Bubbles in window

    A double glazed vinyl window in a 2003 home had bubbles in what looked liked a film on the glass. The film (?) was on the inside of the inner glass panel. I'm thinking a problem with Low-E film installed by the manufacturer. I don't know the manufacturer of the window. There were more bubbles than visible in the picture. Has anyone run across any information on a phenomena like this?

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    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  2. #2
    C.Johnson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    I would have to agree with your assessment, low-e coating is popping off of glass. I use to install windows for a large window company and I have ran across this several times. The coating is sprayed on and if there is any dust at all on glass the coating can pop off like in your pic.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Good to know C.!
    These window companies are pissing me off!
    They have 10 year warranties that only apply to the original owner!


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    can't tell by picture--not clear enough--but could be leaking insulated glass or failed seal--see that a lot in colorado

    cvf


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Quote Originally Posted by CHARLIE VAN FLEET View Post
    can't tell by picture--not clear enough--but could be leaking insulated glass or failed seal--see that a lot in colorado

    cvf
    What's the difference?


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Having a reflective surface near the inside of the window or upon it especially one exposed to intense midday sun can damage the thin suspended films between the glass. Have seen damage from "crystals", mirrored pieces, etc. from ornaments hung near or upon the inside of thermal window units. Early seal failure, and bedding /oozing of glazing unit to frame of "vinyl" window sashes and fixed units.Those little sundancer mobiles made with clear fishing line and bits of mirrored glass and reflective faux stained glass, and other types of ornaments from catalogs and "dollar stores" fastened to the glass via suction cups are real nusiances on other than single paned glass fenestrations.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Quote Originally Posted by CHARLIE VAN FLEET View Post
    can't tell by picture--not clear enough--but could be leaking insulated glass or failed seal--see that a lot in colorado

    cvf
    Hard picture to get. I needed a dark flat surface to place behind the window. But up close and in person, it wasn't typical of bad seals or bad desiccant. Not moisture.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Quote Originally Posted by C.Johnson View Post
    I would have to agree with your assessment, low-e coating is popping off of glass. I use to install windows for a large window company and I have ran across this several times. The coating is sprayed on and if there is any dust at all on glass the coating can pop off like in your pic.
    With the sprayed on (sputter) coating would it not need moisture for the contaminates to become activated (not sure of best term)?
    The picture appears to have the defect at the bottom of the pane close to the spacer. If the seal has failed that would account for the moisture to interact with the coating.

    General note for others who might not be familiar with how Low-E coating are created.

    Low-E is generally metallic specks that are applied to the surface of the glass.
    The metallic specks are applied in a liquid suspension.
    Basic methods,
    1) Glass is coated at window plant where the windows are assembled. The glass is cut, coated and then dried. The sprayed on (sputter) coating is the thicker of the processes of application. The sputter coated glass is susceptible to contamination and damage from handling. This process allows the window builder to offer the coating as an option to their glass. At times the coating can be seen as wavy colors from light refraction.

    2) Glass is coated by the glass manufacture where the coating is applied at the floating of the glass and the coating is embedded in the glass surface itself. This method allows the glass to be handled without damage to the coating. Also produces a more uniform and less noticeable product.

    Many window manufactures have gone to offering Low-E on all of their windows and just stocking Low-E as their standard inventory for material.

    There is another method that has the coating on a thin plastic film that is hung between the two panes of glass with separation from the glass. Which is a discussion for another time.


  9. #9
    Richard Anderson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    I have seen this type of film on the lower half of full length windows in kid active area's, and on store front window, it is in place in case of the window glass breaking and pieces falling on someone, Also I have seen it installed after a crack in the glass was made to stop fogging and of course to stop a crack from growing. Call a glazing company they can help you out further, if this window has no cracks or pin holes and the customer wants it off, take it off. Please take my advice as it is, as I am going by the one picture you have provided.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Richard,
    Stuart said ...."The film (?) was on the inside of the inner glass panel."...
    I took it to mean on the interior side of dead air space between the panes.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Ever see the "rainbow" effect on the glass? Caused from the glass panels being in contact.

    rick

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    Richard,
    Stuart said ...."The film (?) was on the inside of the inner glass panel."...
    I took it to mean on the interior side of dead air space between the panes.
    Yes - correct

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Bubbles in window

    Rick, Yours looks to me like it could be a suspended film (between the panes) contacting or thermal stress/roller marks from the tempering (heat treatment) of the glass captured through a polarizing lense or filter.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 04-24-2011 at 01:26 AM.

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