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  1. #1
    Stephen G's Avatar
    Stephen G Guest

    Default Lets play blame the Inspector

    My day starts well until the phone rings. Lady says I inspected her house last week, I asked her name and the address, she says she didnt hire me. She is the seller of a home I inspected. The deal went south and "Blame the Inspector" todays home edition was on....
    She was good, and fast. I owe her 240k becuase they didnt buy bla bbla bla... I politely said this conversation is over...I get an email half an hour later, guess who, She found it rude that I broke of talks (I wasnt given a speaking role in the first conv)....how could the AC unit and Furnace be that bad they were just installed when we bought in 1994.' She even had the yr of AC wrong it really is sorta new, manuf in 2006.
    She went on and most of it was incorrect , she is going through sellers grief. They tried to hardball the price and not budge for a million reasons. She chose all of them reasons to seek me out.
    Realtors are telling them its a sellers market...not around here its not. Everything is fore sale, at over inflated sale prices, cheaper to build. You get exactly what you want and a 7 year warranty.
    I am certain that she owes me one wonderful day. Ruined....

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Welcome to the wacky world of home inspections.

    Congratulations.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    She's a moron. There, does that help?

    We describe the house as accurately as we can. Some people have trouble accepting reality. That is not your fault. Are your clients happy with your inspection report? They are the only people you need to worry about.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I have had two this week alone.... and both issues were over the Federal Pacific Panels with Stab Lok breakers that I called out on each. One client purchased anyway even though I warned her about the latent fire dangers... oh well... did the best I could do. The other, client negotiated the price to cover the cost of replacement.... desirable outcome. On both, I got blasted by the Realtor who thought I was being Ridiculous (she had both listings). Life is Good.

    An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure
    Jubilee Home Inspections

  5. #5
    Stephen G's Avatar
    Stephen G Guest

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    'She's a moron. There, does that help?
    quote]

    Yeah, I'm starting to feel better. Thanks guys.


  6. #6
    Stephen G's Avatar
    Stephen G Guest

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Realtor around Christmas called me back asking whatever I coulda said to 'her' clients...I said the drain line your looking at goes from here, floor drain, to the bottom of that cmu wall over there. yep leaking, presently dripping

    my fault


    Hey Ray and John, you old guys have 2 inch thick skin by now...workin on it


    Quote Originally Posted by Dub Smith View Post
    I have had two this week alone.... and both issues were over the Federal Pacific Panels with Stab Lok breakers that I called out on each. One client purchased anyway even though I warned her about the latent fire dangers... oh well... did the best I could do. The other, client negotiated the price to cover the cost of replacement.... desirable outcome. On both, I got blasted by the Realtor who thought I was being Ridiculous (she had both listings). Life is Good.



  7. #7
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    We didn't install the furnace. We didn't create the moisture and termite damage. We didn't install all the double taps in the panel. We didn't deteriorate the chimney flue. We just REPORT it.

    I haven't gotten one of those calls for a while. I must be doing something wrong.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I only had a couple of those calls when I was doing home inspections, after their stopped to take another breath I would break in and state (wording changed as I felt at the moment) "Gosh, I did not find ANY of those items on the SELLER DISCLOSURE ... IF YOU HAD LISTED ALL THOSE ITEMS ON YOUR SELLER DISCLOSURE you would not have been surprised by those items being in my report ... so you were saying?"

    While the above does not solve anything - it does put them on the defensive about those items and takes you off from being on the defensive about them.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Stephen G's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Thanx Jerry, I love those words,,gonna borrow that phrase if this ever comes up again...which it will

    sdg

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    I only had a couple of those calls when I was doing home inspections, after their stopped to take another breath I would break in and state (wording changed as I felt at the moment) "Gosh, I did not find ANY of those items on the SELLER DISCLOSURE ... IF YOU HAD LISTED ALL THOSE ITEMS ON YOUR SELLER DISCLOSURE you would not have been surprised by those items being in my report ... so you were saying?"

    While the above does not solve anything - it does put them on the defensive about those items and takes you off from being on the defensive about them.



  10. #10
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I had a seller once call me in tears. To me that is much harder to deal with than pissed off. Remember, only you can ruin your day, nobody else can.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    During the brief time I performed home inspections, I was called a deal-breaker several times (by sellers and real estate people). I politely responded that the house was the deal-breaker, and I was only doing what my client paid me to do. I also encouraged the complainers to get the faulty items fixed, if they really wanted to sell the places, as there aren't many blind home inspectors around anymore.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    The unhappy seller calling offers the HI an opportunity to promote himself and the HI's business. By arguing with the seller it is then about the HI's ego and lack of self esteem. The defensive approach only acts to protect the ego of the HI. If you only point out where the seller is wrong in their assertions you are just having a debate. But, if you look at the situation as an opportunity to turn the seller into a customer. Yes, look at as an opportunity. Be positive not combative. Take the offensive. Convert the seller to working for you. Singing your praises rather than speaking negatively about you. Granted you do not achieve your goal every time, but the more you do it the better you get at it and thereby more successful. The actual process and method are acquired over time requiring effort and acceptance of failure. All this is based on the inspection being accurate and the HI having the knowledge of what they speak.

    Stephen,
    The woman may have been a moron which would be to your advantage. Never let a seller's call ruin your day. Let it make your day and have fun with it. Approach it as an unexpected opportunity to work your charm and make a conversion. If nothing else make it a learning experience.


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I have a bit of a different perspective on problems with home owners. I'm a licensed HIC from CT, and I'm amazed at how many home owners want the 'cheap fix,' and totally ignore my recommendations on how to 'properly' fix a problem. I have recently been asked to cover over w/vinyl, a peeling fascia/soffit of a house that will probably be on the market in 2 yrs or less, @ around $550k. I explained to the homeowner that the peeling paint is due to water intrusion issues, as well as insufficient ventilation of the attic and cathedral ceiling areas. Covering it up will not eliminate the problem, there will still be water issues due to improper ventilation of the roof (only a few vented openings near the peak of the roof- 'my roofer said it's fine' was the owners response- ' I disagree' was mine, and began to explain the 'why' of proper ventilation, which he did NOT want to hear), rafter bays over a cathedral ceiling are completely filled w/ insulation (no air space for ventilation-lots of mold visible in the bays from above when insulation is pushed back for a visual), plugged up gutters and winter ice dams are seasonal problems w/ this property too.
    I cover my butt, stating clearly in any work proposal the 'correct' way to complete the work, and the owner's selected method. I give a very detailed explanation as to what should be done, and what the homeowner has chosen to do, and the possible problems that the 'not recommended' work will pose down the road. I don't like even being associated with 'not recommended work,' as I feel it reflects badly on me. Trouble is, people are always trying to save a buck. I have been losing out on bids, being low balled by unlicensed, uninsured 'contractors' that will gladly do less than what should be done.
    So, when you HI's get ripped into by these homeowners, I applaud you for doing the right thing, calling out deficiencies and problems you find. It's not pleasant having someone yelling at you on the phone (or nasty email's!), but keep up the GOOD work. Curt Downs
    Licensed HIC CT


  14. #14
    Stephen G's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Yes, I take it to heart, I try not to, but thats how I am wired. To me its a challenge of my trade ability. And I dont like it.

    I didnt write 'dont buy the house' and I dont coach the client. I educate my client.
    It was written above; I 'Represent' the house. I dont get into the selling details. I dont sell homes. I am just a step in the process. If my clients walked from the deal it could be any dozens of reasons. Gotta pick one, they chose the furnace. Which isnt that expensive to replace with a new HE Gas their bills would be lower etc. The sellers got greedy. I didnt get in many words in to pump up my business. She had her sites on me and let go. When the phone call was done she wasnt, emailing me a 12 inch diatribe.

    Garry, I did make light of it, however...it still sucks that she will be bad mouthing my business, because she is a moron.

    Thanks guys



    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    The unhappy seller calling offers the HI an opportunity to promote himself and the HI's business. By arguing with the seller it is then about the HI's ego and lack of self esteem. The defensive approach only acts to protect the ego of the HI. If you only point out where the seller is wrong in their assertions you are just having a debate. But, if you look at the situation as an opportunity to turn the seller into a customer. Yes, look at as an opportunity. Be positive not combative. Take the offensive. Convert the seller to working for you. Singing your praises rather than speaking negatively about you. Granted you do not achieve your goal every time, but the more you do it the better you get at it and thereby more successful. The actual process and method are acquired over time requiring effort and acceptance of failure. All this is based on the inspection being accurate and the HI having the knowledge of what they speak.

    Stephen,
    The woman may have been a moron which would be to your advantage. Never let a seller's call ruin your day. Let it make your day and have fun with it. Approach it as an unexpected opportunity to work your charm and make a conversion. If nothing else make it a learning experience.



  15. #15
    Walter Bancroft's Avatar
    Walter Bancroft Guest

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I inspect in southern WI and, in 22 years, have never actually had this problem. I think the reason is that I encourage all parties involved to attend the inspection, especially the seller!

    Yes, this is the final call of the buyer--whether they feel intimidated having the seller present, but I explain that it is a benefit to them (buyer) if the owner is present to answer any questions I might have (I don't always believe their answer but it helps) plus the big benefit is to be able to discuss any concern found with the home and to be able to show the seller why. I do make sure that the seller is not 'dogging' us during the inspection.

    When the seller can see why I have a concern with something, often they agree and state that they had not been aware, or even that the inspector they had when they bought did not show them that.


    The only calls I have gotten from sellers is to ask if I can refer them to a contractor to fix the problem or, even better, I have received many, many requests to inspect the home that the seller is buying. This was the case just last week where I had two sellers request I inspect the home they're buying.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    As others have said, it happens. Stay at this gig long enough and you will see and hear just about everything from everyone! I had it two weeks ago when I returned to pickup a radon machine. Owner greets me and only said "they are not buying the house because of your inspection". I responded that I had not been told that, but I could understand due to the several inches of water filling the crawlspace!

    Picked up my CRM and made my way to the door. A few days ago I learned that the water was from a broken sump/pump that has been repaired . Now I understand that the wood floors are getting humps in them! Go figure, remove the water, the soil/clay dries out and poof!

    Apparently the original clients were going to buy the home after they took care of the water problem and then they found the humps in the flooring when they went back for a second look.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  17. #17
    Walter Bancroft's Avatar
    Walter Bancroft Guest

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Downs View Post
    I have a bit of a different perspective on problems with home owners. I'm a licensed HIC from CT, and I'm amazed at how many home owners want the 'cheap fix,' and totally ignore my recommendations on how to 'properly' fix a problem. I have recently been asked to cover over w/vinyl, a peeling fascia/soffit of a house that will probably be on the market in 2 yrs or less, @ around $550k. I explained to the homeowner that the peeling paint is due to water intrusion issues, as well as insufficient ventilation of the attic and cathedral ceiling areas. Covering it up will not eliminate the problem, there will still be water issues due to improper ventilation of the roof (only a few vented openings near the peak of the roof- 'my roofer said it's fine' was the owners response- ' I disagree' was mine, and began to explain the 'why' of proper ventilation, which he did NOT want to hear), rafter bays over a cathedral ceiling are completely filled w/ insulation (no air space for ventilation-lots of mold visible in the bays from above when insulation is pushed back for a visual), plugged up gutters and winter ice dams are seasonal problems w/ this property too.
    I cover my butt, stating clearly in any work proposal the 'correct' way to complete the work, and the owner's selected method. I give a very detailed explanation as to what should be done, and what the homeowner has chosen to do, and the possible problems that the 'not recommended' work will pose down the road. I don't like even being associated with 'not recommended work,' as I feel it reflects badly on me. Trouble is, people are always trying to save a buck. I have been losing out on bids, being low balled by unlicensed, uninsured 'contractors' that will gladly do less than what should be done.
    So, when you HI's get ripped into by these homeowners, I applaud you for doing the right thing, calling out deficiencies and problems you find. It's not pleasant having someone yelling at you on the phone (or nasty email's!), but keep up the GOOD work. Curt Downs
    Licensed HIC CT
    I wouldn't feel at all comfortable in making actual recommendations as how to correct a problem. My job is to identify concerns and the impact on the property. Having done that, I always recommend that a 'qualified contractor' be consulted for a second opinion and to correct as needed.


  18. #18
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Killed another deal yesterday. Agent was pissed, but she didn't like me right off the bat. I think she realized anyone outside of a checkbox idiot was going to kill the deal. Client wasn't thrilled that the house had so many issues but were glad I pointed them all out.
    Seller was an older couple who stuck around for the whole inspection. Kept asking 'so is everything Ok?'. Guy built the house himself in 72 and has been rehabbing it ever since. The entire house, every room, had wood paneling. Felt like I was visiting my aunt back in the 70's. Olive green and harvest gold everywhere.
    Disclosure said 'never had water in the basement'. Seemed odd considering the 4"-6" water line around the entire basement and funky smell.
    In a lot of ways it was a great house but updating and rehab costs were going to be enormous.
    It's a shame we get blamed but people don't like it when you burst their dream.

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Bancroft View Post
    I wouldn't feel at all comfortable in making actual recommendations as how to correct a problem. My job is to identify concerns and the impact on the property. Having done that, I always recommend that a 'qualified contractor' be consulted for a second opinion and to correct as needed.
    Walter, I agree with you 100%, I stated that I applaud HI's 'for calling out deficiencies and problems..' I'M a building CONTRACTOR (licensed HIC, I'm NOT a HI), so it's my job to figure out what is wrong, know how to fix it, or recommend someone else that can, as you stated above. So, keep up the good work! Curt


  20. #20
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Bancroft View Post
    I inspect in southern WI and, in 22 years, have never actually had this problem. I think the reason is that I encourage all parties involved to attend the inspection, especially the seller!
    Here it is illegal for me to discuss anything about the report or my findings with anyone except m client. That gives me an easy out when sellers are staying and asking "how does it look", etc. Same thing when they give me the call about killing the deal. The only time I talk to anyone is with the clients prior consent, usually about repairs.
    Even in unlicensed states, ethically I think it would be questionable to discuss the findings with anyone but the buyer or their agent.

    Last edited by Jim Luttrall; 06-08-2012 at 08:16 PM.
    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I had one inspection last year where the seller's agent gave the seller my number. She was a slimey agent to begin with. The sellers starts out by questioning my qualifications and says I am not qualified to evaluate his 7 year old roof. In Washington we are licensed and expected by the state SOPs to evaluate the roof I respond, "whats the issue?" How can I call a 7 year roof worn out? I said that it was damaged extensively by someone with a pressure washer (newly purchased from Walmart sitting in garage) and I recommended that a licensed roofer evaluate it for repair, did you have a roofer look at it? Silence at the other end... I tell him that I cannot actually discuss details of the report with anyone other my client. He make some comments as I hang up on him. Just another day in the trenches....

    //Rick

    Rick Bunzel
    WWW.PacCrestInspections.com
    360-588-6956

  22. #22
    Eric Shuman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I think we all know that the only people that kill the deals are the buyer or the seller. Of course that may be related to what we find wrong with the house or it could be that the seller refuses to budge on making allowances for what we find on the house.

    ANY agent that looks at inspectors as deal killers do not have their client's interest as their motivating factor and they won't refer an inspector that is doing his/her job properly and according to SOPs, etc. If an agent (or a home seller for that matter) thinks I'm a deal killer, so what, I work for the buyer. My intention is not to frighten the buyer, but to educate them on the condition of the home.

    The agents that keep me on their recommended inspectors list do so because they know I am thorough and don't pull any punches and they want their clients to be informed as to what they are getting into. They also know that I will do my best to educate and explain why issues I find are problematic and what some of the potential ramifications may be. Contrary to some inspectors opinions on this board, there are some very good agents out there that do want their clients to get a thorough inspection. A buyer that is properly and thoroughly informed of issues with a house can (typically) determine what they are willing to accept or not, and choose to buy or back out.

    I'm sure there are some inspectors that might scare buyers with their demeanor when explaining findings in the report. There are probably other inspectors that might be a little bit heavy handed and interject their opinions a little too much on issues as well. And of course, there are people out there that have no business being an inspector.

    I think the proper thing to do with your client is to set their expectations realistically before beginning the inspection by explaining that there is no "perfect" house and that issues of various types will be found. Communication skills are a huge part of being a successful inspector and it can be a fine line between communicating facts and opinion or providing too much info or too little. It is not my job to try to influence the purchase of the home but to provide accurate information so that the buyer can make an informed decision.

    Sellers are not a concern in my inspection process unless I find a safety concern they need to be made aware of. That is the law in Texas as Jim pointed out. If the seller is present during the inspection I politely explain that I am not allowed to discuss the inspection with them and that any concerns about the findings should be discussed with their listing agent.

    If the seller gets so upset with the inspection findings that they call me about it, then their agent did not properly set their expectations of the inspection of their home


  23. #23
    cuba_pete's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Bunzel View Post
    I had one inspection last year where the seller's agent gave the seller my number. She was a slimey agent to begin with. The sellers starts out by questioning my qualifications and says I am not qualified to evaluate his 7 year old roof. In Washington we are licensed and expected by the state SOPs to evaluate the roof I respond, "whats the issue?" How can I call a 7 year roof worn out? I said that it was damaged extensively by someone with a pressure washer (newly purchased from Walmart sitting in garage) and I recommended that a licensed roofer evaluate it for repair, did you have a roofer look at it? Silence at the other end... I tell him that I cannot actually discuss details of the report with anyone other my client. He make some comments as I hang up on him. Just another day in the trenches....

    //Rick
    Hey Rick! You inspected the house I bought in 2010...small world!

    By the way, you did a great job and we still love our house!


  24. #24
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    First, I have to permission from our client (usually the potential buyer) to discuss the report with someone else (also required here) at all, otherwise “I can’t discuss any specifics” is the boilerplate reply. Otherwise I usually spin these rare types of calls/discussions along the lines of; aren’t you happy that these issues are now known and they can be corrected so the next offer on your house doesn’t fall through for the same reason?

    I usually try to work into the conversation somewhere that we’d be happy to do the same diligence on an inspection for her (him) on their next home purchase.

    My whole goal is to defuse her emotional reaction - that the report wasn’t about, wasn’t an attack on her personally, it’s just about that things that are found in houses all the time. That’s all. Move the conversation away from the specifics (e.g. that particular furnace), to how a good inspection can help her both in selling this house and buying their next home. (Notice to the outbound one is a “house” the inbound one is a “home.” Another subtle attempt to lower the emotional attachment factor of the current complaint.)

    In the end bring the conversation around from “you killed my deal” to ‘you helped me ensure the next chance is successful.’ And ‘You’re not my enemy, you’re my friend, you can even be a help to me in the future.’


  25. #25
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I had a seller call me a few years ago about my inspection. He started the conversation by saying "did I kick your dog or something?". You can guess how that call went. At one point, he said you're never going to get work from realtors putting out reports like this. Yeah, and your point is........??????????? When I finally had enough of his static, I bluntly pointed out the poor work done in three specific areas.....and he agreed with me on all three counts. I finally asked him what the point was in his call if he agreed with what I called out. "Blah blah blah blah......".

    Goodbye.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    As an update to my earlier post today #18. I got a call this afternoon. It was the Seller's agent calling. "Can we get a copy of your inspection report or whatever you have?. My client wants to see what the issues are so they don't have to deal with another cancellation like this again."
    After explaining to the agent that our State licensing doesn't allow me to discuss the inspection findings with anyone without my clients permission ... the agent wanted ME to contact my client and get permission from them to give her and her client FREE info. After I said I wouldn't do that and it something she or her client could pursue if they wanted, she abruptly hung up.
    Always interesting ...

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Markus,
    Is it not a standard in the Windy City for the seller as part of the contract of sale, that the seller receives a copy of your report as part of the contingency clause dealing with an inspection?


  28. #28
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Walter Bancroft
    I inspect in southern WI and, in 22 years, have never actually had this problem. I think the reason is that I encourage all parties involved to attend the inspection, especially the seller!

    Yes, this is the final call of the buyer--whether they feel intimidated having the seller present, but I explain that it is a benefit to them (buyer) if the owner is present to answer any questions I might have (I don't always believe their answer but it helps) plus the big benefit is to be able to discuss any concern found with the home and to be able to show the seller why. I do make sure that the seller is not 'dogging' us during the inspection.

    When the seller can see why I have a concern with something, often they agree and state that they had not been aware, or even that the inspector they had when they bought did not show them that.


    The only calls I have gotten from sellers is to ask if I can refer them to a contractor to fix the problem or, even better, I have received many, many requests to inspect the home that the seller is buying. This was the case just last week where I had two sellers request I inspect the home they're buying.
    I don't recommend that any inspector invite both sellers and buyers to their inspections. It is a receipt for disaster and in my opinion may be "unethical".

    1. I work for one person - my responsibility is to the buyer. My role is not to mediate any differences between the two. Many buyers I work for are much more comfortable "kicking the tires" by themselves without the owner present. Talk about killing the deal? - this is a perfect way to set up a deal killing experience (created by the inspector). It also can waste more time for both myself and my client.

    2. By encouraging the seller to be there and asking questions regarding conditions, repairs, etc. you have just exposed yourself to owner disclosure discussions and may be required to testify in court. You are encouraging your client to "Believe the verbal answers of the Seller" which may be a dis-service to your client and you may be liable. Negotiations between buyer and seller is not the inspectors role.

    3. I always recommend to my clients that any interrogatories they may have as a result of the inspection, should be in writing AND answers to those questions be in writing and be made part of their contract. Only written disclosure can protect your client. Verbal disclosure means nothing.

    Ken Amelin
    Cape Cod's Best Inspection Services
    www.midcapehomeinspection.com

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Shuman
    I think we all know that the only people that kill the deals are the buyer or the seller. Of course that may be related to what we find wrong with the house or it could be that the seller refuses to budge on making allowances for what we find on the house.
    I think the buyers and sellers are only "PONDS" in the procees and I think the only person that "kills the deal" is the Realtor.

    1. It is their responsbility to prepare the seller for the sale. This includes a pre-sales "seller's" inspection to reduce emotional and time sensitive negotiations.

    2. It is their responsibility to prepare and present an honest disclosure statement and make it available to every interested party.

    3. It is their responsibility to mediate issues that are identified through the discovery process. (which includes repairs and negotiated costs)

    4. It is their responsibility to only show properties that the client is truly interested in and is within their price and affordability range.

    Ken Amelin
    Cape Cod's Best Inspection Services
    www.midcapehomeinspection.com

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    1,984

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Garry, it isn't standard practice here for the Seller or their agent to receive a copy of the report. Typically, the attorney or buyers agent will take items out of the report and add them into a letter for cancellation or renegotiation. My report has a separate defect list so that's often what they see.
    From my limited knowledge of how the deals play out I would say the Seller gets a copy of the full report somewhere around 1/4 to 1/3 of the time.
    Sellers agents often push buyers, especially if the buyer doesn't have their own agent or their agent isn't there, to send them a copy of the report 'because its necessary'. Once the Sellers agent is out of ear shot I explain they have no obligation yada yada ...
    For me Sellers are only around for the inspection once in a great while, a handful or so a year. The listing agent sometimes sticks around on their iPad, sometimes goes for coffee, sometimes shadows to gleen info.

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring City/Surrounding Philadelphia area
    Posts
    3,473

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Most agreements of sale around here state the seller is entitled to copies of all reports and that's fine. But that agreement doesn't say those reports come from me or I have to discuss anything with the sellers. That agreement is between the buyer and seller. The seller wants info or reports, they need to contact the buyers

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    4,170

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Typically around here the seller and their agent do not want to see the full report since they would have to disclose any knowledge of problems. The saying "See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" takes on new creative meaning in the sales process.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Amelin View Post
    I think the buyers and sellers are only "PONDS" in the procees and I think the only person that "kills the deal" is the Realtor.
    "PAWNS"


    Unless they are full of water too ...

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,549

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    "PAWNS"


    Unless they are full of water too ...
    I saw that and let it pass.
    Chess players know that it's pawns, and Dylan fans, too. "He's only a Pawn in Their Game", 1964?

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Well now you know who to call when it's your turn to purchase a home and want the whole truth, right?

    I'm not a H.I. but I would sure have a few preemptive lines for such encounters just as J.P. had.

    As an AHJ, I had to develop an arsenal of answers designed to communicate the facts without fueling an augment or going on defense as to why I'm enforcing the law.
    Notice by just changing the word from the code to the law makes the statement that the requirements are in fact 'law'. Carries a little more weight when advantageous to do so.


  36. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bennett (Denver metro), Colorado
    Posts
    1,394

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    A few weeks ago, I found water inside the inlet pipes in a sump pit and within a foot of the basement slab. I called for a sump pump to be installed. The seller had a plumber come out and tell them that the inspector (me) was an idiot and there was no need for a sump pump.

    So, I spent almost an hour talking to realtors and client about why I disagreed with the plumber. (not about the idiot part but rather the sump pump).


  37. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    We get a decent percentage of business from sellers of the homes that we inspect. They get our reports from the buyers, realtors or attorneys and then call us to do their own inspection when the time comes. So I guess some sellers are able to accept reality and to appreciate a thorough inspection and a detailed report. Obviously some sellers can't get the taste of sour grapes out of their mouths and end up going with, as my good friend Markus calls them, "check list idiots". Well said my brother!

    Dan Cullen
    www.domicileconsulting.com
    Chicago IL

  38. #38

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    In my OPINION, you should never, never tell anyone how to fix! just say in report have an applicable contractor repair as needed!!!

    Again my opinion!!


  39. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,217

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Amelin View Post
    I think the buyers and sellers are only "PONDS" in the procees and I think the only person that "kills the deal" is the Realtor.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    "PAWNS"


    Unless they are full of water too ...
    Thanks, Jerry. I had no idea what he meant by "PONDS".

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring City/Surrounding Philadelphia area
    Posts
    3,473

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    Quote Originally Posted by Rolland Pruner View Post
    In my OPINION, you should never, never tell anyone how to fix! just say in report have an applicable contractor repair as needed!!!

    Again my opinion!!
    Agreed. I don't ever want to get into telling them how something should be fixed. I once said and a coated built-up roof needed to be recoated. The buyer got a roofer who said the entire roof needed to be replaced. I didn't agree with the roofer's assessment but that was the last time I made a specific repair recommendation for a larger system in a house. All it takes is for the buyer to get the right "wrong" professional who thinks HIs are idiots and that's when things go down hill.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  41. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wenatchee Wa
    Posts
    301

    Default Re: Lets play blame the Inspector

    I use FIR commentary- Finding , Implication and Recommendation.

    That implication can have cloak and dagger code information so the client has a basis to work from.

    Also I like using informational links directing them to sites that they can find the information if they desire.

    In this way I am not telling how exactly it should be repaired but it gives them a reference to know what right is. They can choose to be informed or not. Most choose to be informed.

    Also though I do not encourage having the seller present I have ended up getting inspections from the sellers.

    Don Hester
    NCW Home Inspections, LLC
    Wa. St. Licensed H I #647, WSDA #80050, http://www.ncwhomeinspections.com

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