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  1. #1
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    Default Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    Who has actual hands-on experience with this product, or any NHL 3.5 product?
    StoneCoatā€“First time limestone is sprayed on any wall or ceiling

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    Last edited by Aaron Miller; 09-21-2012 at 05:09 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    That's nothing new, I have been doing that to my windows for years with my lawn sprinklers.

    END GLOBAL WHINING

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    I have never seen it that I know of! It looks like a new twist on age old gunite or basically spray on stucco one coat! At this point the downside I can see would be from impact damage and then repairs to it. I'm sure it is fairly tough but I bet it will chip.

    Another questions I would have is how does it react to water cascading down over it. Does it become soft or discolor? How bad does it stain and absorb dirt, grime, etc...

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    Another questions I would have is how does it react to water cascading down over it. Does it become soft or discolor? How bad does it stain and absorb dirt, grime, etc...
    I'd like to know these things as well.

    Texas Inspector
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    inspected a few
    here's another over in GP, TX i think Decopierre USA : Home
    exterior finish was washing off, crumbling off or delaminated
    all was torn off and replaced with other exterior siding/veneer

    may work better inside???

    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    Quote Originally Posted by BARRY ADAIR View Post
    inspected a few
    here's another over in GP, TX i think Decopierre USA : Home
    exterior finish was washing off, crumbling off or delaminated
    all was torn off and replaced with other exterior siding/veneer

    may work better inside???
    There are several different grades depending on what application you have. One for interior, on for exterior, one for high-duty exterior.

    Texas Inspector
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    After more research I find that this material does not have an ASTM listing and is not in the annals of the IRC-ES. No pedigree, as they say. I have found these things:

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  8. #8
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    I was totally perplexed as to how a sprayed on texture could be made to look like true masonary work. Watched one of their videos to learn the mortar lines are hand carved in after the spraying and a level of set has occured. That is a skill that the home owner likely could not reproduce w/o some serious practice. This stuff reminds me of shot-crete. Watched a concrete wall made on a school job by spraying it in place. After forming the back side and setting the re-bar they used some pre-strung piano wires to set the requisite depth and then kept spraying on the concrete, ( shot-crete ), until that depth was reached. Not sure why it was done that way, as the standard form and pour seemed easier. You need an NFL offensive lineman on the end of that shot-crete hose.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Blankenship View Post
    I was totally perplexed as to how a sprayed on texture could be made to look like true masonary work. Watched one of their videos to learn the mortar lines are hand carved in after the spraying and a level of set has occured. That is a skill that the home owner likely could not reproduce w/o some serious practice. This stuff reminds me of shot-crete. Watched a concrete wall made on a school job by spraying it in place. After forming the back side and setting the re-bar they used some pre-strung piano wires to set the requisite depth and then kept spraying on the concrete, ( shot-crete ), until that depth was reached. Not sure why it was done that way, as the standard form and pour seemed easier. You need an NFL offensive lineman on the end of that shot-crete hose.
    This can be applied with a compressor and hopper gun. Exterior grade requires WRB and lath just like Portland cement stucco (or, on mineral-based materials, without the lath), but the interior grade can be applied directly to primed drywall. It is very hard and durable when fully cured after about 24 hours.

    Last edited by Aaron Miller; 09-25-2012 at 11:25 AM.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Hydraulically-Applied Limestone

    In Baltimore MD we have many homes that had a cement applied and formed to look like stone the process was called Form Stone. For the most part it has held up over the decades. Though it was typically applied to brick. The sprayed on product that you are looking at is similar, but I have not seen any in actual application.


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