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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    375

    Default Thermo-ply sheathing

    I have been seeing a lot of this on new construction lately. The builders are cutting strips of the thermo-ply sheathing and using it to flash windows. Some houses will have the flashing tape installed at some windows and at others, the thermo-ply.
    Rarely do I see the edges of the thermoply sealed where they are used as flashing.

    Does anyone have a link or other information about the listed uses of Thermop-ply or detailed install guides (other than the simple install guide printed on the product)?

    Thanks,

    Eric

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  2. #2
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    Eric:

    Thermoply® is sheathing, not flashing. Ludlow has produced no literature permitting the use of their product for flashing. It can also not be used as a substitute for peanut butter, golf clubs, or bustiers.

    I see the same thing a lot up here in White Glove City. This is one of the comments I use:

    All major nail-on flange residential window manufacturers specify that their windows be installed in accordance with AAMA 2400-02, Standard Practice for Installation of Windows with a Mounting Flange in Stud Frame Construction http://www.texasinspector.com/window installation AAMA 2400-02.pdf and ASTM E 2112-01, Standard Practice for Installation of Exterior Windows, Doors and Skylights http://www.texasinspector.com/ASTM%2...stallation.pdf . The windows in this house are not in compliance with these standards. Lack of compliance includes, but is not limited to:

    (1) The windows have been installed with power nailers.
    (2) The nail fins have not been caulked prior to installation.
    (3) The windows have not been properly flashed. See:
    http://www.texasinspector.com/Window%20Flashing%20Tape.pdf

    NOTES TO THE BUILER:
    (1) The existence of a “self-flashing” window is as likely as that of a “self-laid” egg.
    (2) Sheathing is sheathing and self-adhesive butyl flashing is flashing. They are not comparable and certainly not interchangeable.

    You are strongly urged to have a representative of the window manufacturer inspect the installation of these windows and provide you with a written affidavit on Company letterhead to the effect that your product warranty is in force given this installation.

    Aaron


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    4,112

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    Eric, here is a link to their brochure,
    It does not specifically mention using the product around windows.
    I does say windows must be flashed

    Thermo-ply must be installed

    with appropriate flashing and counter flash
    ing
    in conformance with accepted building
    standards and in compliance with local
    building codes
    Thermoply does make flashing products as well as sheathing.



    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  4. #4
    Curt Raymond's Avatar
    Curt Raymond Guest

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    Hi Eric, I have seen simular products used but it is not for the purpose of flashing. It was being used to seal over the nailing fin in order to cut down on air infiltration. I can't tell from your picture but it appears that this might be the case. Just my 2 cents worth. Curt


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    375

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    Thanks for the replies.

    I didn't think about the air infiltration but it seems to me that if the window is properly sealed and flashed it wouldn't be needed. I did't observe any flashing under the thermoply strips.

    Eric


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    What about the roofing felt on the walls??? Who does that these days...might want to mention it to the builder next time that Tyvek home/house wrap (and Typar) has been around for a long time now with good sucess.

    RJDalga
    http://homeanalysts.com
    Kalamazoo, MI

  7. #7
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Dalga View Post
    What about the roofing felt on the walls??? Who does that these days...might want to mention it to the builder next time that Tyvek home/house wrap (and Typar) has been around for a long time now with good sucess.
    I have a friend in the remodeling business who has gone back to add additions on an addition he did 15 years earlier had says he has found severely deteriorated tyvek that just crumbles in your hands.
    Just food for thought. Anyone else seen this?


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    375

    Default Re: Thermo-ply sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Dalga View Post
    What about the roofing felt on the walls??? Who does that these days...might want to mention it to the builder next time that Tyvek home/house wrap (and Typar) has been around for a long time now with good sucess.

    Although Tyvek is becoming the norm in this area, felt paper (minimal - #15 asphalt felt) is still the only weather/water resistant cover mentioned in the IRC code specifically. Tyvek or other products are mentioned just as that, "or other approved water-resistive barrier."

    But then we all know the Jerry Peck line: "The code is the minimal crappiest they have to build it..."

    Properly installed, I think felt does the job, but that is the key with most code applications like this - proper installation.

    There are tons of things I would like to see the builders do better or upgrade but unfortunately, it is already like pulling teeth to get them to even repair the things in our reports (even code violations). Often times on re-inspects I find that the items listed have not been addressed or addressed correctly, even when the builder says they have.

    It would be interesting to find out how Tyvek and other products truly hold up after a few years. I have seen felt also get crumbly and deteriorate on some remodels I have done on older homes but usually it was the exception to the whole, particularly if it had been properly installed and left undisturbed.

    Eric


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