Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Thomas Hudson's Avatar
    Thomas Hudson Guest

    Default Structural Report Language

    I was asked to do a structural inspection last week after the lenders appraiser saw some cracking in the brick veneer of a 1976 split level. I agreed to look at it and if it was of concern I would defer it to a PE. We had been in the worst drought since 1933 here in NC and we have expansive soil so cracking of the veneer is expected. The cracks were vertical stair step and less than 1/16". It was also obvious they had been filled with caulk long ago and had not moved since. I am comfortable that the cracking is not due to a structural failure or defect. I wrote it up as cracks were noted but did not appear to actively moving and I recommended they be filled with mortar to prevent pest and moisture intrusion. Now the lender would like a statement of "I have inspected the cracks in the brick veneer on 188 Main Street and have determined that there is no permanent structural damage at this time. Is that too risky a statement and am I overstepping my bounds by making that claim? Thanks!


    Similar Threads:
    OREP Home Inspector E&O Insurance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    4,112

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Yes, too risky to have them write your opinion, in my opinion. If you are not comfortable with a statement, don't attach your name to it. There is a reason they want you to give a blanket statement like that, they want someone on the hook.
    I would give an opinion that I could stand behind and leave it at that.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    One consideration. Soil drys out and shrinks. Cracks in the masonry develop and are patched. When the rains return and the soil regains its moisture and begins to swell, what happens when those cracks can't close back up?

    Seems to me that when there are extreme conditions, the reactions are less predictable. I think that I'd factor in an "it's anyones guess" element into the evaluation.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,829

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Hudson View Post
    I was asked to do a structural inspection last week after the lenders appraiser saw some cracking in the brick veneer of a 1976 split level. I agreed to look at it and if it was of concern I would defer it to a PE. We had been in the worst drought since 1933 here in NC and we have expansive soil so cracking of the veneer is expected. The cracks were vertical stair step and less than 1/16". It was also obvious they had been filled with caulk long ago and had not moved since. I am comfortable that the cracking is not due to a structural failure or defect. I wrote it up as cracks were noted but did not appear to actively moving and I recommended they be filled with mortar to prevent pest and moisture intrusion. Now the lender would like a statement of "I have inspected the cracks in the brick veneer on 188 Main Street and have determined that there is no permanent structural damage at this time.” Is that too risky a statement and am I overstepping my bounds by making that claim? Thanks!
    IMO, you should not have done this inspection unless you are a PE who specializes in residental foundations. When calls like this come we as home inspectors really should defer them to a PE, even if we know that it is not a problem. A PE is what the lender really needs and if it is a FHA or VA loan what will be required when it gets to underwriting.

    The statement will put you on the hook if the home has a problem down the road. It might also put you in violation of the PE licensing law in your state as this could be considered an engineering function.

    I'm not saying that all home inspectors are any less qualified than a PE, but when it comes to what is best for the client and what the lender really needs the PE wins. Plus, it's not worth the liability for a couple of hundred dollars.

    Last edited by Scott Patterson; 10-29-2007 at 06:53 AM.
    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  5. #5
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post

    I'm not saying that all home inspectors are any less qualified than a PE, but when it comes to what is best for the client and what the lender really needs the PE wins. Plus, it's not worth the liability for a couple of hundred dollars.
    Not to cause an argument, but we are actually far less qualified than a PE. In my state, licenses are required to perform home inspections, unless you are a licensed PE. They have far more knowledge than we do as a general home inspector.

    My license will not permit me to inspect a multi-unit building (even condos) if there are more than 5 contiguous units associated with a single structure (my E&O in$urance will only cover structures up to 4 contiguous units).

    My E&O is just over $2,000/year while a PE pays tens of thousands.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,829

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Randolph View Post
    Not to cause an argument, but we are actually far less qualified than a PE. In my state, licenses are required to perform home inspections, unless you are a licensed PE. They have far more knowledge than we do as a general home inspector.
    That is a poor assumption. It all depends on what the field of engineering the person has his/her degree in. It could be in Agricultural, Chemical, Geological, Biological, Electrical, Mechanical, Hydraulics, Nuclear, Automotive, Civil, and about twenty other fields of study. The PE part just means that they have been an engineer for a specific period of time, and that they have met the other requirements such as testing, etc. It has nothing to due with what a home inspector does and that is defect recognition. The reason that PE's have that grandfather clause is that they lobbied for it, just as they have done in NY and a couple of other states.
    My license will not permit me to inspect a multi-unit building (even condos) if there are more than 5 contiguous units associated with a single structure (my E&O in$urance will only cover structures up to 4 contiguous units).
    Does Indiana say that you can not inspect a mult-unit complex? Most state laws are silent on this, a home inspector license is only for 1-4 family homes or units.

    I know several PE's and they will not do a home inspection under their PE license. Their reports do not have their PE stamp. They do the inspections under their HI license. They also have E&O coverage for home inspectors as their PE in$urance would not cover a home inspection unless it fell under the speciality for their PE license.
    My E&O is just over $2,000/year while a PE pays tens of thousands.
    I have no knowledge of what E&O cost for a PE, but I would think that it would depend on what they are doing.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  7. #7
    Thomas Hudson's Avatar
    Thomas Hudson Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Thanks for all of the comments, I ended up walking from it. As far as PE's go, its a really grey area around what I can and can't say and I don't want to push it. It does get me though because many of the PE's I run in to are far less qualified than me to talk about settlement issues. This is true because most PE's around here are Civil Engineers by training who got a HI license. As an active Builder and Renovation Contractor I feel pretty confident in my assesments. But I do need the PE stamp when designing fixes for foundation issues or for reconfiguring existing homes. But I feel more than qualified to say if a 1/8" crack is linked to a structural failure. But if there is a structural issue, I can't design the fix it needs to be a PE. Our HI Board basically says we can comment on things we are qualified to comment on. I am a builder who has done tons of foundation repair work so I am capable of saying it is or isn't structurally sound. But, I am not able to design a fix for the problem. Yep the water is muddy around these parts.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,315

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Randolph View Post
    My license will not permit me to inspect a multi-unit building (even condos) if there are more than 5 contiguous units associated with a single structure (my E&O in$urance will only cover structures up to 4 contiguous units).
    Going a step further than Scott did, but are you sure your "license will not permit" you to inspect a multi-family building, or, does your license 'just not cover multi-family but you are permitted' to inspect them outside your license.

    I.e., if no license is required to inspect a condo building (and there is a difference between "a condo building" and "a condo unit"), and if your home inspector license *does not forbid* you from inspecting multi-family, then you can.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    That is a poor assumption... The PE part just means that they have been an engineer for a specific period of time, and that they have met the other requirements such as testing, etc. It has nothing to due with what a home inspector does and that is defect recognition.

    I know several PE's and they will not do a home inspection under their PE license. Their reports do not have their PE stamp. They do the inspections under their HI license. They also have E&O coverage for home inspectors as their PE in$urance would not cover a home inspection unless it fell under the speciality for their PE license.
    The PE has a formal education (for what that is worth) and has to meet several other requirement to obtain the license. Not to downplay our profession at all, but there are several unqualified HI's out there. In states that have no licensing, all you have to do is print a flier and a business card and you can inspect homes with no knowledge at all. When Indiana started licensing, all of the old inspectors were grandfathered, so basically, we had a bunch of unqualified people inspecting homes prior to licensing and still have the same unqualified people today. I am not saying that ALL of the older inspectors are not qualified (I'm sure that most of them are good inspectors), but I have had the opportunity to see the reports of some other inspectors who were grandfathered, and it's obvious that they had little knowledge.

    Yes, as a HI, our job is to focus on defect recognition and we are as qualified as a PE to identify a problem, but we are not qualified to determine the exact cause, stability and/or repair of structural settlement. When you find electrical issues you refer to a licensed electrician, plumbing issues gets you a licensed plumber, furnace problems and you refer to a HVAC tech, structural issues due to settlement/movement of the foundation and you refer to a PE.

    I know that there are many PE's who perform inspections just as there are plumbers, electricians, etc. but they charge accordingly. A PE will not inspect a home and include his engineering background to officially determine cause and repair for the fee of a home inspection. They get paid much more for their PE services than that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    Does Indiana say that you can not inspect a mult-unit complex? Most state laws are silent on this, a home inspector license is only for 1-4 family homes or units.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Going a step further than Scott did, but are you sure your "license will not permit" you to inspect a multi-family building, or, does your license 'just not cover multi-family but you are permitted' to inspect them outside your license.

    I.e., if no license is required to inspect a condo building (and there is a difference between "a condo building" and "a condo unit"), and if your home inspector license *does not forbid* you from inspecting multi-family, then you can.
    I was told by a member of the licensing board that due to fire code compliance, common walls, common areas, and the various other things that are associated with multi family units, that our inspections have to be limited to structures with less than 5 contiguous units. I don't know what would happen to one inspecting one condo in a string of 6 should a problem arise, but I know that according to the HI laws in the state of Indiana, they fall outside of the scope of the licensing. Whether they can still be inspected or not I don't know, but there are not many residential complexes with more than 5 joining units, so I see no need to push it and will continue to turn them down.

    Last edited by Jon Randolph; 10-29-2007 at 01:14 PM. Reason: spellllllllling

  10. #10
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote by John: "When Indiana started licensing, all of the old inspectors were grandfathered, so basically, we had a bunch of unqualified people inspecting homes prior to licensing and still have the same unqualified people today. I am not saying that ALL of the older inspectors are not qualified (I'm sure that most of them are good inspectors), but I have had the opportunity to see the reports of some other inspectors who were grandfathered, and it's obvious that they had little knowledge."

    That sounds like the typical sales pitch of newer inspectors when talking to prospective clients... The TRUTH is, bad inspectors do not stay in business. Well, not for long anyway. They eventually get their ass(es) sued off and have a come-to-Jesus meeting with their attorney at some point.

    By the way, it's also my understanding that the grandfathered inspectors are also required to be licensed, but did not require testing at the time of licensing came into play. Upon renewal, these same folks are required to meet the same continuing education requirements as everyone else. Right?

    Just the old "bad inspectors staying in business today" line just doesen't make sense... at all. Actually, I'd bet there are one hell of alot (a greater percentage) of those old timers out there who are more qualified than someone who just took a licensing test and passed it because the diploma mills taught the test... Make sense?

    rr

    Last edited by Richard Rushing; 10-29-2007 at 07:00 PM.

  11. #11
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Rushing View Post

    By the way, it's also my understanding that the grandfathered inspectors are also required to be licensed, but did not require testing at the time of licensing came into play. Upon renewal, these same folks are required to meet the same continuing education requirements as everyone else. Right?


    rr
    Yes, we are all required to be licensed and fulfill our CE requirements to maintain licensing. But I can tell you for a fact that all inspectors are not created equal (as we all know). During my CE , there was one inspector who slept for at least 20 of the 32 hour class, to the point where he had drool on his shirt and didn't hear his cell phone ringing. He got the cert. just like I and everyone else did. This was an older inspector, but very well could have been a newer one but that just shows how easy it is to maintain licensing. He basically bought his CE certificate. Since he spent the $$$, he was awarded the cert.

    The reason that the low quality inspectors are still in business is that they charge less than the the higher quality inspectors. Relators like the low quality inspectors because they do not kill deals and therefore they get more referrals. Yes, I know that the idea is to not be involved with realtors at all, but you have to get started and build up the referral base of satisfied customers to get away from the realtor referrals. The low quality inspectors don't have to worry about that because they have no problem kissing realtor but since it has always worked for them in the past. The low quality ins0pectors in my area also keep the inspection fee low. There are several established inspectors who perform a full inspection for $175-200 and spend from 45 minutes to 1.5 hours at the typical home. This makes the realtor and the bargain shopper happy (at least short term). They perform from 3-4 inspections per day and make more at the end of the day than I can because they are working on volume instead of quality.

    Unless it is proven that there was gross negligence involved, the standards weren't followed, or one was operating outside of their scope it is hard to sue and win. When one is sued and they operate as an LLC, they can easily close door and re-open the next day under another business name. To operate under the standards, you don't really have to do much. Indiana adopted the ASHI standards because they have been around the longest and are usually what is presented in court if you are sued. To fulfill the standards on a typical 3 bed 2 bath home a low quality inspector only has to inspect: a maximum of 9 outlets and/or switches, 8 interior windows and doors, 4 exterior windows, 2 exterior doors, one area of soffit/siding/trim on each side of the home, a quick glance at the walks, drive and deck/porch of present, one floor joist/rafter per side of the home, electrical service equip, and a quick glace of the furnace, a/c and water heater.

    By the way, Indiana licenses expired on 10-2-1007 and we went from 853 to 576 licensed inspectors statewide as of today. A quick glance at the 1st 200 expired licenses showed that 50 of the expirees were grandfathered and 150 of them were licensed through examination.

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Rushing View Post


    Just the old "bad inspectors staying in business today" line just doesen't make sense... at all. Actually, I'd bet there are one hell of alot (a greater percentage) of those old timers out there who are more qualified than someone who just took a licensing test and passed it because the diploma mills taught the test... Make sense?

    rr
    I never said that all of the grandfathered inspectors were low quality, just as not all of the examination inspectors are low quality. But there are a-lot of low quality inspectors who rely totally on realtor referrals and have no problem getting them. Inspectors should grow in their knowledge with every inspection, if they are in the business to serve their clients. Those who do not care about the client and only want to serve the realtors will give the same low quality inspections tomorrow that the gave yesterday. There should be a larger percentage (per pupulace) of the grandfathered inspectors that are more qualified, but you can't discount a newer inspector only because he did not chose to go into this business until after the licensing took effect. In Indiana grandfathered inspectors only had to prove they had performed 25 inspections in the year prior to licensing. They had to do nothing to prove competency. This does not mean that they are not qualified, but I bet that there are several of the inspectors who were grandfathered that could not pass the NHIE, just as there are several inspectors who were licensed through testing that do not posess the knowledge that it takes to perform a "good inspection".


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Whether an inspector was grandfathered or not, well trained or not, it seems to really boil down to how interested is the inspector in his work. Does he have a passion for what he does? That is dependant upon the individual, not training or certifications.

    It's notable that around the time when continuing ed. credits are due I hear many inspectors talking about racing to get their minimum hours in. Now if so many are proclaiming their superior service why are they getting only minimum training?

    I have found that on these forums when topics get into the nitty gritty many guys (and gals) pipe down or go off subject. Some postings that I have made have gone significantly outside of any SOP. To me the lack of responses indicate that either people are not interested in such discussions or have no idea about what I'm "babbling" about.

    There will always be varying levels of educated inspectors, some top drawer, some not. It's this way in every professional field. The interesting thing about a forum is that it fairly well demonstrates each member's standing in the field.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  13. #13
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post

    There will always be varying levels of educated inspectors, some top drawer, some not. It's this way in every professional field. The interesting thing about a forum is that it fairly well demonstrates each member's standing in the field.
    I think that the fact that we are all here in this forum demonstrates (for the most part) the desire to improve not only themselves but the industry as a whole. I know that the competency levels will always vary and that is what sets each one of us apart. My biggest beef is that as a fairly new (2 years) home inspector, it is hard to get established because there are so many (old and new) who are willing to suck up to the realtor gods.

    I know that I will be successful and will be a leader in the industry in the future because of my integrity, thoroughness and experience. I just have to admit that it will take longer because there are so many suck ups out there and the fact that they are charging unreasonably low fees. I set my price at the upper end of the prices in my area when I started because I know that I am well worth that, but based on the quality of others, I am way underpaid.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,315

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Randolph View Post
    I know that I will be successful and will be a leader in the industry in the future because of my integrity, thoroughness and experience. I just have to admit that it will take longer because there are so many suck ups out there and the fact that they are charging unreasonably low fees. I set my price at the upper end of the prices in my area when I started because I know that I am well worth that, but based on the quality of others, I am way underpaid.
    Jon,

    If I recall correctly, on another recent post on another thread, you are parlaying the some old 'we are not code inspectors' stance promoted by so many HIs (both new and old), why not "I know that I will be successful and will be a leader in the industry in the future " become that leader now and grab code as your back up and use that to help differentiate yourself from all those other you are referring to above.

    Instead of promoting 'the status quo' and saying you will be a leader, take the leadership role and become one ... now.

    HIs are inspecting homes "built to code" (well, at least the homes *should be* "built to code" as a minimum standard).

    HIs are there to see what is 'right' and what is 'not right', in order to do that, one must be familiar with 'how it should have been done', i.e., "code".

    "Code" *IS* the basis for every structure built (except in areas which have no code, and then applying the nationally recognized code is not a bad thing, but a good thing), why not make it the basis for your inspection report (oh, wait, it already is, why do you think you are looking at so many things and know what to look for, GFCIs, sizes or wires for electrical use, etc. - because all of those are based in code)?

    Use that as "documentation" and "backup", use it to "set yourself apart" from those (your quote - "(old and new) who are willing to suck up to the realtor gods").

    No more Mr. Status Quo for you.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  15. #15
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Jon,

    If I recall correctly, on another recent post on another thread, you are parlaying the some old 'we are not code inspectors' stance promoted by so many HIs (both new and old), why not "I know that I will be successful and will be a leader in the industry in the future " become that leader now and grab code as your back up and use that to help differentiate yourself from all those other you are referring to above.
    Jerry,

    On a home that was built 80 years ago and has had additions, upgraded witing, plumbing, new furnaces etc., I stand firm on the fact that I am not a code inspector. If the client wants to know if everything conforms to the code that pertained when the item was added, upgraded, etc. I can and will do the research if dates are available for all of the above, but my fee will be much higher. If I don't know the date of the room addition, deck building, garage wiring, etc. I can't quote code for the time that it was added. I inspect according to the current code and try (through this board and other resources) to keep up on that as much as possible.

    I notify the client on what is required to be functional and safe today. On a 50 year old home, I recommend GFCI's on all counter outlets, bath outlets, garage outlets, basement and crawl outlets and exterior outlets. The same home will have 6" 2nd floor balcony balusters listed as a safety hazard requiring repair due to the life safety issue. I also recommend anti-siphon devices will be recommended on the hose bibs. But I can't quote code unless I know when the improvements took place.

    A new house is obviously a different story. It should be constructed according to the current code.


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
    Posts
    1,363

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Jon,

    I'll make it a little more difficult for you. Rather than saying built to "current" code, how about built to the "adopted" code at time of construction?

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,315

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Randolph View Post
    I notify the client on what is required to be functional and safe today.
    Based on what? Today's codes.

    On a 50 year old home, I recommend GFCI's on all counter outlets, bath outlets, garage outlets, basement and crawl outlets and exterior outlets.
    Based on what? Today's codes.

    The same home will have 6" 2nd floor balcony balusters listed as a safety hazard requiring repair due to the life safety issue.
    Based on what? Today's codes.

    I also recommend anti-siphon devices will be recommended on the hose bibs.
    Based on what? Today's codes.

    See, everything you are *already* writing up is 'based on codes of today'. You are *already* applying "code" to those older homes.

    This is because, through advances materials and technologies, experiences, and learned knowledge, the codes of today try to make a structure safer than codes of yesterday and yesteryear.

    The only thing you are not doing is 'admitting that you are' using codes as a basis for your inspections.

    Become the leader you seek to be. Stand up and be counted, lead those other HIs you complain about to 'the promised land', that of "professionalism" and respect, not that of being compared to 'used car salesman'.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  18. #18
    Dave Rice's Avatar
    Dave Rice Guest

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    How about saying "based on todays standards" instead of code. We were taught that saying your inspecting a structure to ensure it meets code leaves yourself open for several questions such as " do you know the code for ------ since you are a code inspector?" Using the word "standards" is what your training involved at school and with your parallel inspections. Also there are a lot of inspectors out there that just do enough to get by in their inspections. Have been told by a couple of realtor's one inspector here in AZ advertises any inspection for $125.00 and his inspection time is approximately 1 1/2 hrs. Don't know how he can even do an inspection in that time but his reports are approximately three pages long. Don't know who he is and don't want to know who he is. Good luck guys and Merry Christmas to all of you.
    Dave Rice
    Phoenix, AZ


  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,315

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Rice View Post
    Using the word "standards" is what your training involved at school and with your parallel inspections.
    Do you know what "standard" to which stucco is to be applied by? To which "standard" lath is to be applied by?

    Do you know which "standard" to which ... you can see my point by now - if you are going to use the term "standard" to avoid using the term "code" you need to be able to identify and back up your "standard". And it needs to be the proper and applicable "standard", not just what some HI school taught.

    Not being critical, just advising you to be cautious when you choose words like that.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    1,056

    Default Re: Structural Report Language

    In North Carolina, HI's are not allowed to use the word Code in our reports.

    I am a licensed GC. I took a 10 week course where we spent 80% of time simply reading the IRC. I passed a 4 hr state exam on the code. I have a passing familiarity with the code. When I find something in a home that is off, then I pull out the code and look it up.

    In my reports I use the term current building practices require followed by a paraphrase of the specifc code. I still meet the state laws regarding Home Inspectors using the C word but I have provided enough information to back me up.

    I tout my GC license as a deciding factor between me and other inspectors, particularly on new construction. My GC license is proof to customers that I am code knowledgeable. ICC certification is my next training and certification goal.

    "The Code is not a peak to reach but a foundation to build from."

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •