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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Florida
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    552

    Default Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    I am contemplating a tile floor in the Lani and, due to small cracks in the floor, want to use a anti-slippage covering before applying the tile. This appears to be a standard in Florida. The contenders are a rubber material that is applied to the clean floor with a bonding coat, a web-like material that is applied with thin-coat, and a liquid coating that is applied in two to three coats. Any comments, especially on the coating?

    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,252

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Rich,

    You are referring to a crack separation membrane which resists slab cracks from transmitting through to the tile.

    The are all hit or miss and none meet the Tile Council of America crack separation membrane requirements - I used to have the Tile Council of America book (loaned it to someone and forgot who I loaned it to) and they have a specified method for crack separation membranes.

    Do some searching on the Tile Council of America site and you may find something, even a Google search may turn up their drawing of what is specified.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    No. San Diego Co., CA
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    562

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    I used a liquid coating over my front entryway slab. The area is somewhat enclosed and not really exposed to the elements. I considered the coating as a moisture barrier rather than crack filler. The stuff I used was a blue/green color which took at least three coats. I pressure washed and used concrete cleaner first then waited a couple of days for it to dry before I coated, which was easy to apply with a roller.

    The tile went down without any problems but in damp weather (don't have too much) I see a little efflorescence in some grout lines, more noticeable because the grout is brown. It disappears after a day or two. Pretty expensive as I recall, maybe $40 a gal. If the slab was more exposed, I would probably go with an alternative. Though it's been over a year and no grout cracking etc.

    I'm just about to tile a small bathroom floor, over slab, and will probably go the same route, minus the pressure wash.

    Last edited by Ian Page; 01-07-2015 at 01:44 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    CAL
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    5

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    I have three kids and I need a similar thing at home. They have been running around and I need to make sure that all floors inside and outside is not slippery to avoid accidents.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPan88 View Post
    I have three kids and I need a similar thing at home. They have been running around and I need to make sure that all floors inside and outside is not slippery to avoid accidents.
    What is being discussed does not affect the surface of any flooring, it is between the flooring (ceramic tile, natural stone, etc) and the subfloor (slab) under it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    No. San Diego Co., CA
    Posts
    562

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPan88 View Post
    I have three kids and I need a similar thing at home. They have been running around and I need to make sure that all floors inside and outside is not slippery to avoid accidents.
    Throw some tacks down....😊


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Rick, this may be what you are really after.

    Schluter-DITRA-XL serves as an uncoupling layer,

    Waterproofing, Uncoupling and Drainage Membranes - Schluter-Systems


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Florida
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    552

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    Rick, this may be what you are really after.

    Schluter-DITRA-XL serves as an uncoupling layer,

    Waterproofing, Uncoupling and Drainage Membranes - Schluter-Systems
    Actually, I was looking at that product. It is probably is the one that I will be using, as well as having a grout line over the slab joint. Besides, I notice it has the "Holmes" seal of approval-----so it must be good!!


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Lansdale, PA
    Posts
    876

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    I do not have any experience with these, but generally Schluter makes good products. If you want good advice regarding tile installations try the John Bridge forum. I have found them to be very good.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Goeken View Post
    Actually, I was looking at that product. It is probably is the one that I will be using, as well as having a grout line over the slab joint. Besides, I notice it has the "Holmes" seal of approval-----so it must be good!!
    Not sure I would take an endorsement by someone that has to use screws all the time because
    he can not hit a nail.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Idaho
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    30

    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    I can't help but feel screws hold things in better than nails. Especially decks.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Chinook View Post
    I can't help but feel screws hold things in better than nails. Especially decks.
    No argument on deck boards, framing is something else. Knowing the correct nail and application is the key.

    I have only watched (stomached) his show a few times. But when I see them using screws for toe nailing basic framing and all else interior it gives me pause about their abilities.

    Just figure that the underlying reason is that his workers can not be trusted not to get hurt with a pneumatic nailer. Every box of nails have a paper with warnings and pictures of what not to do, which gives me a chuckle every time I open a new box. But then people will the most stupid things, having no common sense.


  13. #13
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    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Anti-slippage Materials under Tile

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Chinook View Post
    I can't help but feel screws hold things in better than nails. Especially decks.
    Quote Originally Posted by Garry Sorrells View Post
    No argument on deck boards, framing is something else. Knowing the correct nail and application is the key.

    I have only watched (stomached) his show a few times. But when I see them using screws for toe nailing basic framing and all else interior it gives me pause about their abilities.

    Just figure that the underlying reason is that his workers can not be trusted not to get hurt with a pneumatic nailer. Every box of nails have a paper with warnings and pictures of what not to do, which gives me a chuckle every time I open a new box. But then people will the most stupid things, having no common sense.
    His show is a joke, and HE gets to laugh all the way to the bank.

    Screws versus nails, though - the answer to which is best is "it depends".

    "It depends" on what the use is and "it depends" on the type of screw or nail.

    Most screws tend to break more easily than nails ... nails bend more easily than screws ... except for some nails and some screws.

    An example: straps used to hold structures together use nails - except that Simpson has developed a special screw which has bending properties similar to that of nails, and some of their straps can have those special screws used instead of nails ... greater pull out resistance without the breakage typically associated with screws.

    I would not recommend replacing nails with screws ... unless the screws were specifically designed for that specific purpose for which you are going to use them.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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