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  1. #1
    Scott Lynch's Avatar
    Scott Lynch Guest

    Default Weep holes over lintels

    Last edited by Scott Lynch; 12-20-2007 at 03:43 PM.
    NHIE Practice Exam

  2. #2
    imported_John Smith's Avatar
    imported_John Smith Guest

    Default Re: Weep holes over lintels

    Scott, the Brick Industry Association shows details about weeps and lintels.
    See link below:
    http://www.bia.org/bia/technotes/TN7.pdf


  3. #3
    Bruce Lunsford's Avatar
    Bruce Lunsford Guest

    Default Re: Weep holes over lintels

    The short answer is - yes. Flashing and weeps are required over lintels, although it is VERY often not enforced.

    As to the arch, I would not make an issue out of that. It is directly under a soffit so where is the water going to come from? Further, I'm not sure weeps would even function there at all anyway. IMHO it is a non issue.


  4. #4
    Brian Hoagland's Avatar
    Brian Hoagland Guest

    Default Re: Weep holes over lintels

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Lunsford View Post
    The short answer is - yes. Flashing and weeps are required over lintels, although it is VERY often not enforced.

    As to the arch, I would not make an issue out of that. It is directly under a soffit so where is the water going to come from? Further, I'm not sure weeps would even function there at all anyway. IMHO it is a non issue.
    Choose your battles, don't choose this as one. Technially the answer is yes/practiaclly the answer is NO! No sense in making enemy of the trades when it has no significant effect on the structure or inhabitants.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Weep holes over lintels

    So WE should 'choose' what our client's get to know ???

    If you know something is a defect, report it....inform them. But also inform them of the implications so they can be advised as to the significance and decide what THEY want to do (consult with a mason?).

    I tell clients when weep holes are absence and, in so many words, I also tell them of the complications of trying to do something about it after the fact (do we know if the drainage plane is actually there, will the guy with the drill puncture the drainage plane if it is there, etc.).


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