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  1. #1
    Rick Maday's Avatar
    Rick Maday Guest

    Default What do you call this?

    Rope, string, wick? Why is it there?


    Thanks,
    Rick

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,217

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    I call it a weep hole.

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  3. #3
    Rick Maday's Avatar
    Rick Maday Guest

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    Why would there be rope in there and why so high? The others were open and just above the foundation.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Osceola, AR
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    Is that a line of flashing in the morter joint at the base of this course?


  5. #5
    Aaron Miller's Avatar
    Aaron Miller Guest

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    Rick:

    It is, as Bruce pointed out, a weep wick. The plastic below this course of bricks is the flashing for the brick ledge.

    Aaron


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,281

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    From the Brick Industry Association:

    What is the best weep system?
    Weep systems in use include wicks, oiled rods, weep tubes, open head joints, and vents. BIA does not advocate one type of weep system over another. Wicks should be spaced at 16" o.c. with the remainder of the weep systems spaced at 12" o.c. Rope wicks can be made from cotton sash cord. Drainage materials used at the bottom of the cavity are most effective for open type of weep holes like open head joints, weep tubes, etc., however it could be used with rope wicks.
    It is important to maintain a clean, open cavity for weep holes to function properly. If mortar droppings are anticipated, then it is best to detail a drainage material that will catch any mortar like pea gravel or mesh.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,313

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom D'Agostino View Post
    From the Brick Industry Association:

    It is important to maintain a clean, open cavity for weep holes to function properly. If mortar droppings are anticipated, then it is best to detail a drainage material that will catch any mortar like pea gravel or mesh.
    This ( MORTAR NET ) is a new product I've been seeing use recently. Of course, though, it has always been installed upside down and first and the masons have to remove it and install it right side up - does not work upside down.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tampa, Fl
    Posts
    155

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    One reason for a wick type weep hole is the weep wick is designed to wick up moisture from the cavity and expose it to the exterior atmosphere where it can more easily evaporate.


  9. #9
    Donald Merritt's Avatar
    Donald Merritt Guest

    Default Re: What do you call this?

    Old masons used sections of rope where the weep holes go in the brickwork. After they have laid several courses of brickwork, these sections of rope were pulled out and you had a weep hole. Now they just leave out the mortar between the ends of the brick batts. ps. the rope will not come out after the mortar has set. Also these sections of rope are too small for a proper weep hole.

    Don Merritt
    Germantown, Tennessee


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