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Thread: Siding Type?

  1. #1
    Kirk Hersee's Avatar
    Kirk Hersee Guest

    Default Siding Type?

    There is this siding that seems to be a compressed fiber board or something. Once it ages, it flakes and looks & feels like cardboard. Any clues?
    Sorry for the lack of clarity, but maybe there's enough here between the 2 images to be helpful:

    http://img102.imageshack.us/img102/4448/dsc07701rz4.jpg
    & closeup
    http://img102.imageshack.us/img102/4250/dsc07729lp9.jpg

    Thanks for any assistance. Kirk

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  2. #2
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    Hardbaord siding--

    This siding is at or has exceeded it's life expectancy and is deteriorated to the point of needing immediate replacement. My recommendation is for a qualified siding contractor who specializes in siding replacement provide replacement costs prior to the expiration of all buyer options.

    Rich


  3. #3
    Kirk Hersee's Avatar
    Kirk Hersee Guest

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    My assessment exactly. And, coincidentally, Hardboard Siding is what I put for it . Go me!


  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Sioux City, Iowa
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    45

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    This is hardboard siding and I agree with the other assessments.


  5. #5
    Kirk Hersee's Avatar
    Kirk Hersee Guest

    Default Siding Type Revisited

    I come upon this from time to time. My guess is that it is a form of asphalt as it looks and feels like asphalt roof shingle material, but is used on houses sometimes. This is the first time that I've noticed it has layers behind it. So, now I'm wondering if there's more to it. Any ideas?
    Here is the rear of the house in all its asphaltial glory:


    And here is the close-up:
    ImageShack - Hosting :: dsc08242ii4.jpg

    As always, I appreciate all your help. Kirk


  6. #6
    Jim Zborowski's Avatar
    Jim Zborowski Guest

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    Is it brown and crumbly? This would be the masonite siding. If it is actually grey paper like material ( resembling cardboard packing dividers ), the only place I've personally seen this used is on Wausau homes in the mid seventies. Might be able too contact them for more info. Interrestingly, they also used material made from this for the soffits and in place of drywall.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
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    Default Re: Siding Type?

    Wow Kirk. That's like a blast from my past back in the northeast. There was a lot of that on the lower end houses in PA. I wasn't a home inspector back then, but I'm pretty sure it was just an asphalt shingle designed for vertical siding. I don't know what they layered behind it, probably just tar paper. I think the majority of them have been covered with vinyl or aluminum siding by now.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Chicago, IL
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    2,797

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    The material in the second detail is "asphalt impregnated celotex board" AKA "rolled asphalt brick siding", very common in my area.

    A page on this material:

    National Register of Historic Places | Historic Properties | Historic Preservation of Arkansas landmarks and Main Street Arkansas through programs & grants


    It's really not such bad stuff, it holds paint well and as each panel (about 24x36") is held on with 4-6 nails it usually comes off without additional damage to the underlying surface.

    Here's how I report it:

    Observation: (FYI ) Portions of this building are sided with asphalt impregnated celotex board (also called "rolled asphalt brick siding") which was often sold under the brand names of Insulbrick, Inselstone or Inselwood. This siding consists of a granular asphalt exterior layer (much like the surface of a roofing shingle) bonded to a fibrous core. This siding is subject to damage when struck by hard objects and tends to fray and/or crack at exposed edges and corners. Eventually, sections of the surface coating may detach from the fibrous base. Replacement siding is no longer available. The panels were typically nailed to the underlying surface with 4-6 nails per panel, and can usually be removed with little additional damage to the surface below. For additional information see: National Register of Historic Places | Historic Properties | Historic Preservation of Arkansas landmarks and Main Street Arkansas through programs & grants .

    Feel free to lift any of that you find useful.

    Last edited by Michael Thomas; 05-28-2008 at 07:08 AM.
    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  9. #9
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    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Siding Type?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Robinson View Post
    Wow Kirk. That's like a blast from my past back in the northeast.
    My thoughts exactly when I saw it "Wow Kirk. That's like a blast from my past".

    There was a lot of that on the lower end houses in PA.
    And New York state as well.

    I wasn't a home inspector back then,
    I was just a kid, but I remember that stuff on many houses.

    but I'm pretty sure it was just an asphalt shingle designed for vertical siding.
    Yep.

    I don't know what they layered behind it, probably just tar paper.
    Or, as in the second photo, asbestos cement shingles behind it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  10. #10
    Jim Zborowski's Avatar
    Jim Zborowski Guest

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    OK, now I see a picture. Yep, definately the fake brick / asphalt material. Still see some locally. My biggest concern would be the flamability issue.


  11. #11
    Kirk Hersee's Avatar
    Kirk Hersee Guest

    Default Re: Siding Type?

    The material behind the asphalt seems papery (cardboard or layered paper). The asphalt is definately tacked over wood shingles. I would say ... "This siding consists of a granular asphalt exterior layer (much like the surface of a roofing shingle) bonded to a fibrous core" ... is the best description. Thank you Michael and everyone for your detailed responses. Kirk


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