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  1. #1
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    Mar 2007
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    Fuquay Varina, NC
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    Default Flashing and weep holes.

    Home built in 1994 and I only have code books back to 97. All brick home. Block and brick foundation, 2x6 treated sill and conventional wood framing with celotex fiber 4x8 wall sheathing. There are weep holes right above the foundation wall where the framing starts. There is no flashing along the foundation only fiber board brought to the bottom of the sill. No moisture barrier except the fiber board panels on the home. I know the flashings where not there from checking at foundations vents in the crawl space. I could slide my hand up between the framing and veneer.
    Was it required to have flashings back in 94. Also when was flashing first introduced in these areas.

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  2. #2
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    Mar 2007
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    Fuquay Varina, NC
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    No comment's.........Come on guys give me something............Thanks

    Mike Schulz License 393
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    To my knowledge, it's always been required.

    This is from the 1994 Standard Building Code (SBCCI). (bold and underlining is mine)
    - B1403 VENEERED WALLS
    - - B1403.1 GENERAL
    - - - B1403.1.1 Veneer refers to a facing of brick, tile, concrete, masonry units, metal, including metal coated with porcelain enamel, glass, wood or similar material securely attached to a wall for the purpose of providing ornamentation, protection, or insulation but not so bonded as to exert a common reaction under load.
    - - - B1403.1.2 Veneer shall not be assumed to support any load other than its own weight, neither shall it be assumed to add to the strength of the wall.
    - - - B1403.1.3 Veneered walls shall provide weather protection for the building at the walls.
    - - - B1403.1.4 Flashing shall be provided as necessary to prevent the entrance of water at openings in or projections through veneered walls. Flashing shall be provided at intersections of veneered walls of different materials unless such materials provide a self-flashing joint and at other points subject to the entrance of water. Caulking shall be provided where such flashing is determined by the building official to be impractical.
    - - - - B1403.1.4.1 Flashing and weepholes as outlined in B2111.1.3 shall be located in the first course of masonry above finished ground level above the foundation wall or slab, and other points of support, including structural floors, shelf angles and lintels when anchored veneers are designed in accordance with B1403.2.4, B1403.2.5 and B1403.2.6.

    B2111.1.3 WEEPHOLES. Weepholes shall be provided in masonry veneer and in the outside wythe of masonry walls at a maximum spacing of 4 ft (1219 mm) on center by omitting mortar in the head joints. Weepholes shall be located in the first course above the foundation wall or slab, and other points of support, including structural floors, shelf angles, and lintels.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    Thank you Jerry, you always come through.

    Mike Schulz License 393
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    I have a question regarding flashings at the first course above grade. If you have a poured wall with a brick ledge dropped from the top of the foundation, is the flashing really even needed? Any moisture would still hit the bottom of the brick ledge and be able to weep out through the weep holes? As long as the WRB is over the top of the foundation what would be the problem?

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  6. #6
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    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    Without flashing the water will drain onto the concrete brick ledge.
    Since concrete is porous, the water will soak into the concrete, then into the wall, floor, carpet.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    Might get away with out flashing if 5000 psi

    Mike Schulz License 393
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    Without flashing the water will drain onto the concrete brick ledge.
    Since concrete is porous, the water will soak into the concrete, then into the wall, floor, carpet.
    Hi Rick, I know concrete is porous, so is brick though, I know it's the end of the drainage plain, but there shouldn't be a flow of water. Mostly will just be water from condesation. I do see your point if the floor system-or wall starts at the same height as the brick.

    I am talking about when the brick ledge is dropped from the floor system. Normally about 12". You would still have your airspace at the ledge, with weep holes at the bottom, so any moisture from the wall would still drain. I really don't see the need for flashing in this situation. As long as you WRB extends past the floor system enough that is doesn't wick up under. If you get enough water to back up 12" high, you have a much bigger problem.

    The weep holes and air space should let the concrete dry enough so it won't stay wet all the time. Especially not wet enough to wick up to the treated plate and floor system up 12". Besides, the sill plate should be separated with sill sealer from the foundation. Does that make sense?

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Flashing and weep holes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Door Guy View Post
    I have a question regarding flashings at the first course above grade. If you have a poured wall with a brick ledge dropped from the top of the foundation, is the flashing really even needed? Any moisture would still hit the bottom of the brick ledge and be able to weep out through the weep holes? As long as the WRB is over the top of the foundation what would be the problem?

    Okay, as I understand what you said, you have a foundation wall which is on a footing down, say, 3 feet, and a brick ledge also down 3 feet with the brick veneer setting on that brick ledge with what would have been the air space now grouted solid as required.

    Right so far?

    The brick veneer, anchored brick veneer (which is what we are talking about), requires the through wall flashing at the first course as it is presumed that the grouted solid area will end at the first course above grade.

    After all, brick veneer has a 1" air space, and until you get above the grouted solid part you do not need a through wall flashing. You could, if you wanted to, and if you designed the brick veneer to be anchored to support the load of it, fully grout the air space so there was no air space and the wall was fully grouted, however, that would make the wall some other method than brick veneer as defined and addressed by the codes and would need to be addressed based on its construction.

    No through wall flashing would be needed, maybe not even a WRB if the substrate was a masonry structure (CBS). You would definitely need to have an engineer design the solid grouted wall if there was a frame wall behind it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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