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  1. #1
    Dennis R's Avatar
    Dennis R Guest

    Default lifetymene paint system

    Does anymone have info / experience concerning this product?
    Lifetyme Exteriors

    I've been asked to look at a house that has this product on it.
    It was applied a year ago.
    I was told the house was power washed first.
    The paint is bubbling and water was found between the siding and the tyvek.
    The homeowner thinks the water is from the power wash.
    The paint company says the product is breathable.
    I've been told the issue affects all sides of the house.
    Property located in Eastern MA about 3 miles from the ocean.

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  2. #2
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: lifetymene paint system

    It breaths it does not let flowing water out. I have seen the same situation in the past. If water gets behind it it pretty much holds it in until it evaporates and then it will slowly dissipate. This is just like any building product that is not sealed completely from the weather such as window flashing and such. Minor moisture will not have a big affect but water infiltrating will sit behind it for some time.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: lifetymene paint system

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis R View Post
    The paint is bubbling and water was found between the siding and the tyvek.
    The homeowner thinks the water is from the power wash.
    The paint company says the product is breathable.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    It breaths it does not let flowing water out.
    To restate what Ted said: Water and moisture are trapped on both sides of the coating, if trapped on the outdoor side, no harm, no foul, however, if trapped on the interior side, think water = decay = damage.

    There is 'liquid' water, as in a water in a glass and water 'vapor' as in the water which is suspended with the air.

    Water 'vapor' can pass through materials with a permeability sufficient to allow for it, and with a high enough permeability rating to allow for enough of it to pass through in a short enough time. Those materials will not allow 'liquid' water to penetrate through it.

    If the permeability of the coating does not allow vapor to pass through adequately enough, that vapor can become trapped on one side of the coating, and (under the right conditions) condense into 'liquid' water. That is bad. Here is a good example of permeability ( Permeability ).

    SmartCoat, Liquid Siding, it is all an elastomeric liquid applied coating (paint is a liquid applied coating too) which has some degree of permeability to it.

    Here are some typical building materials and their permeability ratings (rated in Perms):
    - SmartCoat = ??? it did not say, it did say it was 10 thicker than paint, which may not be a 'good thing' as regards permeability - that sucker needs to breathe vapor through it
    - Exterior grade plywood = 0.70 perm
    - Kraft paper = 0.40 perm
    - Aluminum foil = 0.05 perm
    - Poly plastic sheeting, 6 mil or greater = 0.0014 to 0.06 perm (varies)

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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