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  1. #1
    Brian Salm's Avatar
    Brian Salm Guest

    Default ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    Trying to find information on the ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist system pertaining to the design and construction of the intermediate support/bearing wall. I looked at the online literature at Weyerhauser's website but I can't seem to find anything or I am possibly overlooking it.

    Ranch style home with this floor system. TJI's are constructed at a depth of 11 7/8" and placed 16" o.c. The intermediate support wall (in the basement) supports a 10 foot section of joists spanning 37 feet and a 19 section spanning 33 feet. The intermediate support wall (total length of 29 feet) is constructed of 2x4's with a double top and bottom plate and the studs 16" o.c. (each stud being placed directly below the TJI). My concern is the structural integrity of the support wall as the 2x4's are bowing and the builder/framer has nailed 2x4's lateraly across the face of the wall to eliminate the flex in the studs. This may be an issue for a structural engineer to look at but wanted to see if there is any obvious information out there that this support wall should be constructed differently.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Brian

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  2. #2
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    If the 2x4s are bowing do to the downward pressure then one would think it is time for and engineer. Personally I don't know why they did not put a beam and posts in to begin with. Yeah, I know, they needed a wall there anyway. Still, time for and engineer to give his opinion/evaluation. Contrary to popular belief there is no problem for referring a matter out for further evaluation. No one is going to take what you or any of us has to say for an evaluation and just do it. They will all do their own evaluation before they render their opinion for repairs. In all it sounds like things were not engineered properly or maybe they were and the framing contractor just did it his own way.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    Brian,

    I doubt that the information for the ilevel TJI floor joist system would give design information on the supporting structure as that would be variable up to the designer.

    Is it possible that the diagonal 2x4s are there for diagonal bracing and not for trying to pull the studs into alignment?

    A standard load bearing wall would be 2x4 space 16" on center with a double top plate, just as you described, however, if supporting an extra heavy load, then maybe 2x6 should have been used.

    Were the 2x4 bowed when installed?

    Are they bowing under pressure? (See Ted's call for the structural engineer.)

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Brian,
    ...
    Is it possible that the diagonal 2x4s are there for diagonal bracing and not for trying to pull the studs into alignment?...
    Note the difference in terms "nailed 2x4's laterally across the face of the wall to eliminate the flex in the studs.

    I have a mental picture of a horizontal rather than diagonal 2x4 nailed to the face which would give very little strength to the wall. Even a 2x4 diagonal that is face nailed rather than let-in will do little to provide strength.
    Since you can obviously see the framing, it sounds like there is no sheathing of any kind.
    The 2x4 wall may be all that is needed but without the stiffness provided by sheathing warping and racking of the wall should be expected.
    Get an engineer to design a fix. Any good carpenter could do the repair, but to protect you client, get an engineer.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  5. #5
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
    Richard Pultar Guest

    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    if they are bowing off the plain of the wall I would suspect green lumber. look for a grade stamp.
    the span is no longer the distance of the length of the truss its from bearing to bearing


  6. #6
    Brian Salm's Avatar
    Brian Salm Guest

    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    If the 2x4s are bowing do to the downward pressure then one would think it is time for and engineer. Personally I don't know why they did not put a beam and posts in to begin with. Yeah, I know, they needed a wall there anyway. Still, time for and engineer to give his opinion/evaluation. Contrary to popular belief there is no problem for referring a matter out for further evaluation. No one is going to take what you or any of us has to say for an evaluation and just do it. They will all do their own evaluation before they render their opinion for repairs. In all it sounds like things were not engineered properly or maybe they were and the framing contractor just did it his own way.
    I agree Ted. It is my belief the 2x4's are bowing due to the downward force/pressure being placed on 2x4's. The studs are nailed 16" o.c. at the plates but measure approx. 17.25" o.c. at the middle. Thank you for the reply.

    Brian


  7. #7
    Brian Salm's Avatar
    Brian Salm Guest

    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Brian,

    I doubt that the information for the ilevel TJI floor joist system would give design information on the supporting structure as that would be variable up to the designer.

    Is it possible that the diagonal 2x4s are there for diagonal bracing and not for trying to pull the studs into alignment?

    A standard load bearing wall would be 2x4 space 16" on center with a double top plate, just as you described, however, if supporting an extra heavy load, then maybe 2x6 should have been used.

    Were the 2x4 bowed when installed?

    Are they bowing under pressure? (See Ted's call for the structural engineer.)
    With the 2x4's being placed across the studs laterally it sure gives the appearance the studs were trying to pulled into alignment some time well after construction began.

    I thought about the fact that the 2x4's could have been bowed when installed but they sure give the appearance they are bowing because of excessive loads.

    I think your idea about 2x6 or a laminate beam may have been more appropriate for this design. Recommending a SE.

    Thank you Jerry.


    Brian


  8. #8
    Brian Salm's Avatar
    Brian Salm Guest

    Default Re: ilevel TJI 110 Floor Joist System

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    Note the difference in terms "nailed 2x4's laterally across the face of the wall to eliminate the flex in the studs.

    I have a mental picture of a horizontal rather than diagonal 2x4 nailed to the face which would give very little strength to the wall. Even a 2x4 diagonal that is face nailed rather than let-in will do little to provide strength.
    Since you can obviously see the framing, it sounds like there is no sheathing of any kind.
    The 2x4 wall may be all that is needed but without the stiffness provided by sheathing warping and racking of the wall should be expected.
    Get an engineer to design a fix. Any good carpenter could do the repair, but to protect you client, get an engineer.

    Correct Jim. 2x4 bracing is horizontal, appearing to bring the studs into alignment. No sheathing. SE recommendation is in order.

    Thank you.

    Brian


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