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  1. #1
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Another gold mine

    Something in the email. Should I say, one of many.


    Subject: Testing for Sulfur Containing Gases in Drywall


    Identifying Source Odors from Sheetrock with EMSL Analytical

    It has been reported that drywall imported between 2004-2006 from certain areas in China, can release sulfur-like odorous components. These compounds can corrode air conditioning coils and other copper-bearing materials, causing them to be replaced repeatedly. It has been determined that the problem is related to presence of iron disulfide (FeS2 pyrite). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon disulfide (CS2) are also suspected as culprits. There have been reports that large quantities of drywall produced in China were kept on sea barges for months awaiting permission for importation to the USA. This drywall has a higher than typical density and a higher propensity to off-gas sulfur compounds.

    Drywall is usually made of gypsum (hydrated calcium sulfate). Therefore, sulfur is one of the main components present in the sample. All drywall has sulfur in its elemental composition; therefore the odor is not explained by an analysis of the total sulfur content.

    The extent of the indoor air quality issues related to this is still unclear. EPA is currently investigating the severity of the problem. However, it is well known that exposure to sulfur compounds can create irritation and breathing disorders.

    EMSL's approach for the analysis of drywall samples is diverse. The possible avenues are outlined below:

    1. Analysis of the drywall samples for presence for presence of iron and Fe2S by X-ray Fluorescence by X-ray Fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, or light microscopy.

    2. Analysis for presence of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and H2S using an environmental chamber.

    3. Copper corrosion test can be performed to identify and confirm the presence of substandard drywall (exposure of fresh copper coupons to subsamples of the odorous drywall in presence of humidity).

    4. Sulfur odors may also be produced when anaerobic bacteria utilize certain molecules for growth. Therefore, endotoxin analysis for gram negative bacterial contamination and anaerobic plate count may be recommended.

    You could choose one test or combinations of these tests, depending on the level of the analysis you would like to achieve.

    Price:
    Test 1: $600/sample (10-business day TAT; call for shorter TAT?s)

    Test 2: $1200/sample for first sample; $950/sample for any subsequent sample in the same order (15-business day TAT, no shorter TAT?s available)

    Test 3: $1800/sample (20 businesses day TAT, no shorter TAT?s available)

    Test 4: $130/sample (6+ business day TAT)


    For further information contact Dr. Eugenia Mirica at 1-800-220-3675 ext. 1247

    Yours Truly,

    EMSL Analytical, Inc.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    The price looks high to me, but the problem may be real:


    "Air conditioning manufacturers nationwide are taking an economic hit as they repeatedly replace copper coils destroyed by the recently exposed "Chinese drywall" phenomenon, local air condition company owners said.

    "I have never seen this many air conditioners fail at this age," said Fred Kobie, owner of Kobie Kooling in Fort Myers and a 25-year industry veteran. "It's almost an epidemic down here."

    For about two years, scientists, engineers and vendors nationwide struggled to learn why evaporating coils in new machines in new developments have gone sour often in under a year, Kobie said..."

    - Drywall blamed for A.C. failures | news-press.com | The News-Press

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  3. #3
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    I read that Mike

    You would think that if it were the drywall someone would have some kind of definitive proof after 2 years

    " Customers blame them not just for the first failure, but for the second and third coil failures in a matter of months."

    Air quality tests have been done. How many and by who, I don't know but again after investigating for 2 years you think something somewhere would be definitive.

    For what air test that have been done and nothing found to be harmful to humans I cannot see how 3 coils in a few months could be possible at all with out someone finding something diffinitive.

    Then you have to look at the pricing of the tests. If they are testing, what are thaey telling the folks the tests mean.

    The whole thing sounds rediculous. Yes, it may be a fact but for all this money to be getting spent to determine what?????? What have they determined.

    The article you read and other articles I have read have not found anything for anyone to move forward on. You would think that if the concern was anywhere near the epidemic proportions they are claiming someone would have been able to say, ah hah, this is absolutely it and the company that manufactured the junk would be paying out tremendous amounts of money. Like remodelling entire homes.

    6 12 1800 dollars for tests

    Price:
    Test 1: $600/sample (10-business day TAT; call for shorter TAT?s)

    Test 2: $1200/sample for first sample; $950/sample for any subsequent sample in the same order (15-business day TAT, no shorter TAT?s available)

    Test 3: $1800/sample (20 businesses day TAT, no shorter TAT?s available)

    Test 4: $130/sample (6+ business day TAT)


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    4,170

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    Sounds like the mold is gold boys have found another useless test to sell. Sounds like it is pretty simple to identify:
    When peeled back, the sulfur on the Chinese drywall smells like rotten eggs.
    I can only imagine what the electric panels, switches, and outlets look like in these homes.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    WESTMINSTER CO
    Posts
    1,090

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    i had some sulfor contaminated gas in my bedroom last night--wow lifted the sheet and it was gone--damn woman


  6. #6
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    Quote Originally Posted by CHARLIE VAN FLEET View Post
    i had some sulfor contaminated gas in my bedroom last night--wow lifted the sheet and it was gone--damn woman

    Just don't let her eat steak, eggs, beans and hot peppers all in one sitting. Then you won't need some strange inspector coming over and doing tests on her


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    Just don't let her eat steak, eggs, beans and hot peppers all in one sitting. Then you won't need some strange inspector coming over and doing tests on her

    I thought that was only from eating Chinese food?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Another gold mine

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    I thought that was only from eating Chinese food?

    Yeah, that also

    On another note about the original post.

    I got a call today about a funny maybe musty/mildewy but can't be locked down on the smell of a new home I inspected a month ago. I did not do a phase inspection, just a final before walk thru/closing inspection. Now after all this talk about "the new gold mine" and the other thread about "chinese drywall", hmmmmm. Just in the master bedroom though. No dampness or excess moisture and no signs anywhere (from what I am told). Maybe its time for the rotten egg test?

    Gotta go back and smell around, poke around and do some moisture tests. No moisture when I was there a month ago, on the surface anyway. Oh well. Maybe another days pay.


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