Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    David Millner's Avatar
    David Millner Guest

    Default insulation in manufactured homes

    Did a manufactured home for a client. Customer asked about insulation and found this tag info. I had to admit I could not provide an answer.


    On the 'tag' of the modular was written: U sub 0, Walls 0.17

    I have tried to find clarification can any of you shed light on this?

    Thanks

    Similar Threads:
    F.I.R.E. Services

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by David Millner View Post
    Did a manufactured home for a client. Customer asked about insulation and found this tag info. I had to admit I could not provide an answer.


    On the 'tag' of the modular was written: U sub 0, Walls 0.17

    I have tried to find clarification can any of you shed light on this?

    Thanks
    I have no idea. Keep in mind that manufactured homes are built to DOT guidelines.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by David Millner View Post
    On the 'tag' of the modular was written: U sub 0, Walls 0.17

    The U factor is how the materials of the structure is constructed, with each material adding to the U factor.

    The R-value is the reciprocal of the U factor, thus a U factor of "Walls 0.15" would equal an R value of "Walls R-5.88".

    The "sub 0" may be the sub floor area?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Mesa AZ
    Posts
    1,181

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by David Millner View Post
    Did a manufactured home for a client. Customer asked about insulation and found this tag info. I had to admit I could not provide an answer.


    On the 'tag' of the modular was written: U sub 0, Walls 0.17

    I have tried to find clarification can any of you shed light on this?

    Thanks
    If it's a Mfg. home , [ not a moduler] there should be a piece of paper with insulation information, wind zone and other info. taped or glued to the inside of a laundry room cabinet door , or a kitchen cabinet door.

    Phoenix AZ Resale Home, Mobile Home, New Home Warranty Inspections. ASHI Certified Inspector #206929 Arizona Certified Inspector # 38440
    www.inspectaz.com

  5. #5
    Ed Voytovich's Avatar
    Ed Voytovich Guest

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The U factor is how the materials of the structure is constructed, with each material adding to the U factor.

    The R-value is the reciprocal of the U factor, thus a U factor of "Walls 0.15" would equal an R value of "Walls R-5.88".

    The "sub 0" may be the sub floor area?
    Jerry: The U-factors of materials cannot actually be added. Lower U-factors are better at stopping heat flow by conduction. Therefore, if you have a U=.02 material over a U=.05 material, adding them would appear to give you worse performance rather than better.

    Pardon me if anybody's head explodes, but here's a definition: the U-factor tells us how many BTUs of heat pass through one square foot of a given material or assembly of materials per square foot of area per degree F difference in temperature. British Thermal Units are the way we quantify heat. A BTU=roughly the amount of energy contained in the head of a kitchen match; 100,000 BTUs equal one therm. Therms are how utility companies measure and charge for natural gas.

    R-values represent resistance to heat flow. R-values can be added and then converted to U-factors by dividing them into 1. Since R-values get bigger as performance improves and U-factors get smaller, and since most Americans think that bigger is better, most window salespeople harp on R-values.

    If you can find a window salesman who knows what a U-factor is, you might have a shot at a grown-up conversation about his product.

    The U-factor can be found on the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) sticker. Window R-values are as stated by the manufacturer, and are taken at the center of the glass. Just as home inspectors are third-party evaluators of real estate, the NFRC is a third party evaluator of windows. Talking about R-values is like taking the seller's word for the condition of the house.

    There cannot be a U=0 value, so it's hard to interpret that part of the manufacturer's statement unless they rounded off. It can be very, very small, but it can't be zero because that would violate the Second and Third Laws of Thermodynamics. Heat absolutely, always, and inevitably goes from warm to cold. It might take it a very long time, but it will obey the Laws.

    This is also why we cannot get to absolute zero temperature: there is nowhere for the last tiny bit of heat to go.

    If you think State Highway Patrolmen are strict, The Laws of Thermodynamics make them look like a charitable organization. No slack. Absolutely no slack.

    If you've read this far you may be thinking "All this stuff is beyond the scope, who's Ed trying to kid?" Everything here, except how to read an NFRC label, should be covered in middle school general science or earth science and again in elementary high school physics. It should be common knowledge. You can bet that students in India and China have no trouble understanding basic heat transfer. Let's keep up with them.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,549

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The U factor is how the materials of the structure is constructed, with each material adding to the U factor.

    The R-value is the reciprocal of the U factor, thus a U factor of "Walls 0.15" would equal an R value of "Walls R-5.88".
    1 divided by 6 = 0.17. R6 won't sell trailers, so confuse them with 'U 0.17".

    The "sub 0" may be the sub floor area?
    A while back, you said 'sub' was a submarine!


  7. #7
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    I put an Infrared Camera on a few Mobile homes and its like nothing is there. with 2X2 walls you can't get much help. and i think if you were to get some help with insulation condensation would be a problem.

    Best

    Ron


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: insulation in manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    1 divided by 6 = 0.17. R6 won't sell trailers, so confuse them with 'U 0.17".
    Yep, that's what I was pointing out.

    A while back, you said 'sub' was a submarine!
    Right, under the sub floor is where they keep the submarine with the panel in it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •