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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Oregon
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    Default Holes drilled in lower window track

    Milgard vinyl single hung windows - every one of them has a big hole drilled in the lower track, presumably for security system window sensors.

    Is this as bad an idea as it appears or am I missing something?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Plano, Texas
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    Default Re: Holes drilled in lower window track

    Yep, it is that bad.
    But hey, it will only leak when it rains!

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
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    Default Re: Holes drilled in lower window track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    Yep, it is that bad.
    But hey, it will only leak when it rains!
    Jim I know it don't rain much in Texas, but even in Oregon it won't rain inside unless that window is open.

    Now that it's there, it needs caulking, and the installer needs a slap to the head.


  4. #4

    Default Re: Holes drilled in lower window track

    Jim I know it don't rain much in Texas, but even in Oregon it won't rain inside unless that window is open.
    There must be an installer in our area that sticks to that method, at least 'til he has to pay for a bunch of window repairs. It's a single hung window, and water will hit that window and drain down into the track, which is the reason for the weep holes in the corners.

    I run into that installation about once a month or so. Anybody know what the best repair is, besides replacement? I'm assuming someone who works with plastic could open up the track area and plastic weld the hole-- may be cheaper? I'm sure the manufacturer would void any warranty that may have existed.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Chicago, IL
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    2,797

    Default Re: Holes drilled in lower window track

    Barry Adair gave me permission to use the first photo a while back, don't know where the 2nd is from.

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    Michael Thomas
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  6. #6
    Kevin Barre's Avatar
    Kevin Barre Guest

    Default Re: Holes drilled in lower window track

    The situation is a little more complicated than it may appear at first look. The sash sits in a trough; it's intended to get water in there even with the window shut. That type of window actually has a lower chamber in the frame below the hole the alarm guy drilled. The rectangular weephole visible in the corner on the track under the sash drains to that lower chamber. The lower chamber has a weephole on the front of the sill that then lets that water out. Drilled out like it is, you penetrate both the top (accessible) section of sill, but you also penetrate the lower (inaccessible) section. I can't really see a way to seal the bottom one up thoroughly unless you cut a larger hole in the top sill for access and then patch over it.. That would be three kinds of ugly...and then there's also the warranty issue as mentioned. Bad idea all around, and way too common around here..


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,248

    Default Re: Holes drilled in lower window track

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Jim I know it don't rain much in Texas, but even in Oregon it won't rain inside unless that window is open.
    Actually, even the manufacturer disagrees with that.

    See that rectangular drain hole which drains to the outside? That is for the water which collects in that bottom sill, and which is also why the ends of that bottom sill are sealed where it meets the side jambs.

    [quote[Now that it's there, it needs caulking, and the installer needs a slap to the head. [/quote]

    Now that it's there, not only does the installer need a slap to head, the installer needs a slap to the head with a 2x4 with 16d spikes sticking out through of it ... AND THEN ... the installer needs to reach into their pockets and dig down deep to replace those windows and NOT screw up the new replacement windows.

    Added with edit: Oops, just read Kevin's post and saw that he covered the same thing I did.

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 08-20-2009 at 10:43 AM. Reason: Added last line.
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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