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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington State
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    579

    Post CSST Exposed in attached garage.

    This is a 2003 built home. Garage extends out from home and has only one wall that joins the home. Sheetrock is installed at wall between home and garage. My concern is that there is no sheetrock on ceiling or at side wall where CSST pipe enters garage and is routed between studs and over trusses. I have never seen CSST exposed like this in a attached garage.

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  2. #2
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: CSST Exposed in attached garage.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trent Tarter View Post
    This is a 2003 built home. Garage extends out from home and has only one wall that joins the home. Sheetrock is installed at wall between home and garage. My concern is that there is no sheetrock on ceiling or at side wall where CSST pipe enters garage and is routed between studs and over trusses. I have never seen CSST exposed like this in a attached garage.
    TT: There is nothing which specifically prohibits the installation you depict. Gastite says only this:

    Gastite
    CSST installed in locations subject to physical damage shall be adequately protected. The tubing shall be protected
    at points of support and when passing through structural members such as studs, joists and plates. Where all three of the
    following conditions exist mechanical strike protection must be used.

    1. Concealed
    View is obstructed by walls, and structural members.

    2. Constrained
    Tubing is not free to move to avoid puncture threats.

    3. Within 3 inches of a potential threat
    Tubing is routed in locations which are within 3 inches of drills,
    screws, or nails.

    I would at least pen a cautionary statement or two to the buyer about inevitable future storage in the attic space and the possibility of damaging the CSST in the process.




  3. #3
    Mitchell Toelle's Avatar
    Mitchell Toelle Guest

    Default Re: CSST Exposed in attached garage.

    I agree with A.D. on routing and exposure. However, there may be a concern with how the CSST, and wiring, penetrate the sep. wall. I believe they are to be chased with proper material where passing through the wallboard, and properly sealed in the chase. Perhaps someone else has the reference.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: CSST Exposed in attached garage.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Toelle View Post
    I agree with A.D. on routing and exposure. However, there may be a concern with how the CSST, and wiring, penetrate the sep. wall. I believe they are to be chased with proper material where passing through the wallboard, and properly sealed in the chase. Perhaps someone else has the reference.
    The gypsum board going up the house / garage wall from floor to roof serves as the separation wall, and, being as it is not a "fire-rated wall assembly" no specific things need to be done other than sealing around the penetrations "with approved material to resist the free passage of flame and products of combustion". While the code does not specifically address what type of sealant is required to be used, the codes wording is an indication of what "should" be used.

    The IRC states:
    - R309.1.2 Other penetrations. Penetrations through the separation required in Section R309.2 shall be protected by filling the opening around the penetrating item with approved material to resist the free passage of flame and products of combustion.


    That is a good description, if one were to describe it, of fire-rated caulking, i.e., intumescent caulking.

    Also, if that were a fire-resistance rated assembly, the roof sheathing would need to be protected out 4 feet from each side, and that vent opening through the roof would not be allowed within that 4 foot distance.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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