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Thread: Vaulted ceiling

  1. #1
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    Default Vaulted ceiling

    What is the difference between a vaulted ceiling and a cathedral ceiling?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Vaulted ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Mohel View Post
    What is the difference between a vaulted ceiling and a cathedral ceiling?
    A cathedral ceiling is a type of vaulted ceiling. Vaulted ceiling designs are basically any designs that are raised.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Vaulted ceiling

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Mohel View Post
    What is the difference between a vaulted ceiling and a cathedral ceiling?
    GM: Anywhere else but in the U.S. that would be a simple question to answer. Here though, where the ignorant masses bandy about terms with no concern as to their actual meaning, it is not quite so simple.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vault_(architecture)

    True vaulted ceilings consist of dome, barrel, groin, ribs and fan, even hyperbolic vaults. These are all details one usually associates with ceilings seen in real cathedrals.

    "Cathedral ceilings" in this country are usually slanted and pointed, or just the opposite of what one would expect to see in an authentic cathedral.

    "Cathedra" means a bishop's throne. So then, "cathedral" is an adjective describing a place containing a bishop's throne. Pointy though their hats may be, I don't think a slanted or raised ceiling in a Fox and Jacobs starter home could accurately be described as cathedral.

    Just another meaningful term highjacked by dumb-asses for their own entertainment.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Vaulted ceiling

    While AD is more astute at the origins of the words and architectural history; here is an article that gives a common description which more closely mirrors common terminology for today's world.

    http://www.the-landscape-design-site...g-Ceilings/669

    Cathedral Ceilings - A cathedral ceiling is a ceiling that has a center point higher than the walls. This is the most common type of upgrade to ceiling structure and goes a long way to increasing the overall perception of room size.

    Vaulted Ceilings - A vaulted ceiling has one wall of the room taller than the opposing wall. The ceiling slants down to the lowest wall again giving the impression or illusion that the room is larger than it is really is due to the increased volume. If planned correctly, an often inexpensive way to upgrade your home during the building process. In many cases, this upgrade is little more than selecting the correct type of ceiling trusses.

    Coffered Ceilings - One of my favorites, coffered ceilings comes in numerous styles and finishes from rich hard woods to simple painted drywall surfaces. The box like structure can be very expensive based upon the type of finish selected. Homebuilders have recently begun to use a variation of coffered ceilings in some areas of the home to highlight light fixtures in areas such as the dining room. If your home has the ceiling height to work with there are do it yourself kits available that are relatively easy to install. A handy person could build out a coffered looking ceiling using ordinary lumber and sheetrock with spectacular end results that can still get that ‘wow’ from someone entering the room.

    Cove Ceilings - Often found in home from the early 1900’s these types of ceilings while providing a classic and luxurious look are not nearly as difficult to create as would first appear. The quarter circle curve is usually accented with crown molding where it meets the wall providing a uniquely Victorian look. This look is best when the ceiling has a minimum height of 10 feet to provide a large enough radius for the transition from ceiling to wall.

    Final Finish - The final finish can make a big difference in the look of your home and is something a do it yourselfer can change in an existing home. Removing an old acoustic ceiling or spraying a modern texture such as knock-down in its place, or in the place of having a flat finish might be just the upgrade you are looking for in your home.

    These are not your only options available, but hopefully they have served as a reminder that when building your new home there is more to planning out your ceilings than selecting "white" or "off-white" for your paint color. This Article Was Written By: Robert Church


    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

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