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Thread: Bedroom / Door

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  2. #2
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Quote Originally Posted by brianmiller View Post
    Does a bedroom have to have a door, by building code requirements?
    Not that I am aware of.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    The code does not define a bedroom, however, it does define many differences between bedrooms and outside bedrooms (i.e., other areas and rooms), and to do so would require a means to separate the bedroom from the other areas, therefore a door is needed for that separation.

    Jerry Peck
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The code does not define a bedroom, however, it does define many differences between bedrooms and outside bedrooms (i.e., other areas and rooms), and to do so would require a means to separate the bedroom from the other areas, therefore a door is needed for that separation.
    Would a wall with a cased opening not count? Are there any requirements (shall have) for interior doors at all? Just curious.


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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Quote Originally Posted by chris mcintyre View Post
    Would a wall with a cased opening not count?
    At some point there would need to be a door, otherwise there is no separation between the bedroom (sleeping room) and the other areas. I.e., you could have a bedroom with a sitting room (which is quite common) and both are connected to a hallway which connects to the master bathroom ... but there would need to be a door to the other areas of the house.

    Are there any requirements (shall have) for interior doors at all? Just curious.
    Nope, not that I can think of, not that state "shall have" a door, but, when you try to separate the areas you will need a door to separate the sleeping room (bedroom) from the other areas.

    Jerry Peck
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Jerry, You are very good about providing code references but you will not find any requirement in the IRC to separate a bedroom form other spaces. The only doors required by the IRC are the exit door (2006 IRC R311.4.1), and the door between the house and garage (2006 IRC R309.1).

    If the IRC has not been adopted by the jurisdiction and the IBC applies, the only other door that would be required (excluding fire doors) would be one between a bathroom and a kitchen (2006 IBC 1210.5). Think of a loft bedroom overlooking other living space, or a studio apartment. Not that a door wouldn't be a bad idea, just not required by code, either specifically or by inference.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    No, you do not need a door for a room to be classified as a bedroom. Think of a loft or studio design, neither will have a door but they do have a bedroom. The design provides the separation.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
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  8. #8
    Aaron W's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Agreed, neither the IRC or IBC makes any requirement for a bedroom (technically sleeping room) door. Features of the structure tend to define various spaces throughout the home. For instance, with all the requirements in the code pertaining to sleeping rooms, there is no guidance to determine where the sleeping room starts and stops. In some homes that can be a challege when enforcing arc faults, egress and other issues, and lands on the shoulders of the inspector.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    There is no such requirements written any where.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    I know this is an old thread but just inspected a home listed as 4 bedroom. The 4th bedroom was not attached to the home communal area or a hallway. Is it a bedroom?

    Frank Carr is the Owner / Inspector at First Choice Home Inspections in Deltona, FL serving Volusia, Seminole, Orange and Lake Counties. Formerly in the building trades, Frank’s focus is a safe home and building FCHI. http://1homeinspector.com

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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Carr View Post
    The 4th bedroom was not attached to the home communal area or a hallway. Is it a bedroom?
    Is it attached to the house, or are you saying it is a split bedroom floor plan?

    Split bedroom floor plans are common, such as 2 or 3 bedrooms together (for the kids) and the master bedroom separated from them by the living area of the house.

    Sometimes there is even a separate guest or in-law bedroom, sometimes this is semi-detached from the house (it is actually attached by foundation and roof, just no common wall attachment to the main house (typically advertised as a 'separate guest house).

    As you can see, I'm trying to guess at what you described, and not doing real good at it, but each of the above would still be a "bedroom".

    Keep in mind that "bedrooms" ("sleeping rooms" in code speak) require things that other rooms do not.

    Jerry Peck
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Thanks for the reply Jerry.
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Carr View Post
    I know this is an old thread but just inspected a home listed as 4 bedroom. The 4th bedroom was not attached to the home communal area or a hallway. Is it a bedroom?
    The 4th bedroom has no common or communal access or hallway. The access is from a screened patio.

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    Frank Carr is the Owner / Inspector at First Choice Home Inspections in Deltona, FL serving Volusia, Seminole, Orange and Lake Counties. Formerly in the building trades, Frank’s focus is a safe home and building FCHI. http://1homeinspector.com

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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    If it has a emergency escape and rescue window and a smoke detector I would call it a bedroom. The door into the screen porch does not count as emergency escape because it does not open directly into a public way, or a yard that opens to a public way. 2018 IRC R310.


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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Florida Building Code, Residential has this exception - see exception 2, which is different than exception 2 in the IRC.

    R310.1Emergency escape and rescue opening required.
    - Basements, habitable attics and every sleeping room shall have not less than one operable emergency escape and rescue opening. Where basements contain one or more sleeping rooms, an emergency escape and rescue opening shall be required in each sleeping room. Emergency escape and rescue openings shall open directly into a public way, or to a yard or court that opens to a public way..
    - - Exceptions:
    - - - 1. Storm shelters and basements used only to house mechanical equipment not exceeding a total floor area of 200 square feet (18.58 m2).
    - - - 2. The emergency escape and rescue opening shall be permitted to open into a screen enclosure, open to the atmosphere, where a screen door is provided leading away from the residence.

    Jerry Peck
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Thanks Jerry!


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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    That's why people need to know their state codes - for the differences between the base run of the mill IRC and what their state has amended it to.

    The ICC site lets one find their state codes ... a word of caution, though, some state codes are quite convoluted in some sections (as just seen), some are not, and some have amended almost every page (I don't know if this is still correct, but at one time, the Oregon code has orange (or pink, I forget which) pages to insert into the IRC for amended pages, and the book was mostly orange (or pinkish) pages.

    Referencing the ICC codes is handy and good, but don't take it as gospel until you look at your state codes, of local codes when the codes are locally adopted. Texas used to (may still have this) the IRC adopted statewide ... for counties and cities which had not adopted their own code, which means that it would be like Florida used to be.

    Before the 2001 Florida Building Code (which initially became effective in 2003), Florida required all AHJ to adopt a code ... you read that right ... "a" ... code.

    While most of Florida AHJ adopted codes based on the SBCCI Standard Building Code, some AHJ adopted the National Building Code, others the Uniform Building Code, others ... so mangled the base codes which they adopted with amendments that the base codes were not recognizable.

    The first big step in standardization came with most of the various codes joining together and forming the ICC.

    The 2001 Florida Building Code was based on the Standard Building Code, and was effective statewide. The 2004 Florida Building Code was based on the ICC codes.

    Here is an example of why a statewide adopted, not locally adopted, code is necessary: Florida has 68 counties, 283 (give or take) cities, which meant 350 (rounded off) DIFFERENT CODES in the state of Florida ... how can contractors build like that? Okay, there weren't 350 different codes, mostly because Miami-Dade County had the South Florida Building Code-Dade County Edition and Broward County had the South Florida Building Code-Broward County Edition (both with many vast differences, but at least 'each county' was the same for all contractors in that county, cross the county line and the code was vastly different. Cross the county line to another county and ... each county and each city had their own code.

    Off that soap box now.

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 07-15-2020 at 02:26 PM. Reason: added second part about statewide codes
    Jerry Peck
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Egads Jerry!

    And, I thought California was bad. While CA adopts the building portions of the IBC and IRC, it has instead chosen to not adopt the plumbing, mechanical, & electrical sections of the IRC and adopt the UMC, UPC & NEC (with California amendments). However, many major municipalities (such as L.A. & S.F.) have their own amendments to add onto the codes for their own reasons.

    Don't get me started on the Green Code!

    I have always felt that it is potentially dangerous to make these modifications because the governing body might miss something in a different section of the code (or different code) that would undermine or contradict the original intent. But, I am not in charge. That gives me the chance to complain.

    Department of Redundancy Department
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  18. #18
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    A bedroom without a door is a living room?


  19. #19
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    A "bedroom" without a door?

    I'm sure we've all seen at least one, likely more than one.

    But ... the code uses "sleeping room" ... does that include any room as one can use any room to sleep in? No.

    A "0" bedroom apartment/condo? Sure.

    They are typically called 'efficiencies', the "bed" is typically a piece of furniture against a wall which has a bed that pulls out of it (typically called a Murphy Bed).

    Does an efficiency have a "bedroom"? No ... but it does have a "sleeping room" (a room intended to be used for sleeping, as well as other uses).

    Does one inspect an efficiency "living room" as such (a living area), or also as the "sleeping room" that it is?

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Bedroom / Door

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    At some point there would need to be a door, otherwise there is no separation between the bedroom (sleeping room) and the other areas. I.e., you could have a bedroom with a sitting room (which is quite common) and both are connected to a hallway which connects to the master bathroom ... but there would need to be a door to the other areas of the house.
    So true. One of my uncle's house has 2 bedrooms in a row and so, he differentiated one with door and made an office structure for the another without a door. Because of this, area in the office room between its entrance from outside to the bedroom looks like a hallway only. whereas the bedroom has entire area as the room because of the door. So door is super important for the separation of rooms for me too.


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