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  1. #1
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    Default Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    Inspected a condo today and when i inspected the attic i noticed penetrations in the fire wall and also noticed the styrofoam material that was used. Was this acceptable in the 1980's..

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    I really wouldn't call that a fire wall, although that might be what the person who built it may have named it. As per SCOPES, a fire wall is constructed of non combustible materials. Although it is slow burning, EPS is not non combustible, also I think I see plywood behind it and wood framing on top of it, and below. In a class 1 structure, the fire wall must separate the roofs and any other portion that is wood (or combustible material). That home, along with any other homes connected in the same fashion, compile a single fire division.

    A firewall in a class 1 or class 2 structure must pass through the roof. If the front and rear walls (class1 ), eaves or whaterever are wood, they must extend beyond those too.

    If I had to consider that anything, I may consider it a party wall, or a sound barrier.

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    Not even a fire wall.. Correct



  4. #4
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    One could call that a 'fire wall' of sorts ... as in 'if that thing catches on fire it could become a wall of fire' ...

    Not to mention the potential of deadly fumes ...

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    Sam
    This is not a fireblockl. This is a death wall. As the foam will put out a deadly gas if on fire. This type wall has never been allowed. There should be a thirty minute fire break between the condos. I would call this one out. See R602.8 in the I.R.C.
    Bruce Adams


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    this is probably a draftstop which is required between apartments etc... what was this condo originally called when it was built and did it comply with the code of that time?


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    Quote Originally Posted by brian schmitt View Post
    this is probably a draftstop which is required between apartments etc... what was this condo originally called when it was built and did it comply with the code of that time?

    A good point that it might be a draft stop wall in stead of a fire wall as he did say condo, however, that is not even approved for a draft stop wall.

    Typically, a fire wall will have one or more layers of 5/8" Type X gypsum board, taped and sealed with staggered joints from side-of-wall to other side-of-wall, and staggered between layers.

    Likewise, typically, a draftstop wall will be one layer of 1/2" gypsum board, no requirement for being Type X, and - at best - the joints will be mudded, but if the joints fall on framing there is no need even for that, not for a draftstop wall, and, the draftstop wall only has one layer of 1/2" gypsum board on one side of the wall, not even on both sides of the wall.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    A good point that it might be a draft stop wall in stead of a fire wall as he did say condo, however, that is not even approved for a draft stop wall.

    Typically, a fire wall will have one or more layers of 5/8" Type X gypsum board, taped and sealed with staggered joints from side-of-wall to other side-of-wall, and staggered between layers.

    Likewise, typically, a draftstop wall will be one layer of 1/2" gypsum board, no requirement for being Type X, and - at best - the joints will be mudded, but if the joints fall on framing there is no need even for that, not for a draftstop wall, and, the draftstop wall only has one layer of 1/2" gypsum board on one side of the wall, not even on both sides of the wall.
    jp,
    see ibc 717.3.1 for approved draftstop materials!


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Fire wall in condo 1980"s

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    A good point that it might be a draft stop wall in stead of a fire wall as he did say condo, however, that is not even approved for a draft stop wall.

    Typically, a fire wall will have one or more layers of 5/8" Type X gypsum board, taped and sealed with staggered joints from side-of-wall to other side-of-wall, and staggered between layers.

    Likewise, typically, a draftstop wall will be one layer of 1/2" gypsum board, no requirement for being Type X, and - at best - the joints will be mudded, but if the joints fall on framing there is no need even for that, not for a draftstop wall, and, the draftstop wall only has one layer of 1/2" gypsum board on one side of the wall, not even on both sides of the wall.
    Quote Originally Posted by brian schmitt View Post
    jp,
    see ibc 717.3.1 for approved draftstop materials!
    And???

    I stated "typically" "a draft stop wall" ...

    There are other draft stopping uses and means, and other materials, but "typically" for "a draft stop wall" 1/2" gypsum board is what will be seen (at least from my experience).

    I do not, however, see any EPS foam approved for use in a draftstop wall.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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