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Thread: Log Homes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lawndale, NC
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    4

    Default Log Homes

    I'm getting ready to inspect my first log home. Agent indicates it's a kit about 1400 square feet, 3 years old. I don't know the name of the log home company. What should I look for when inspecting a log home?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    southern ontario
    Posts
    130

    Default Re: Log Homes

    I would personally pass that job, for your sake and the client's, if your not up on that style of construction.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    5,847

    Default Re: Log Homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Crotts View Post
    I'm getting ready to inspect my first log home. Agent indicates it's a kit about 1400 square feet, 3 years old. I don't know the name of the log home company. What should I look for when inspecting a log home?
    Look for rot/water damage around windows, doors and corners. If it has chinking you need to make sure it is intact. Make sure that it has been sealed and is not just bare wood.

    FYI>>>> With many homes the logs are set by either the manufacturer or a contractor. The finish work is often done by the owner.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Log Homes

    Look for signs of foundation problems such as cracks or settlement. Those walls are heavy. Make sure the bottom logs are well clear of the dirt.
    Kit logs usually fit together fairly well, but Dufus may have gotten some parts mixed up.
    Expect to see creative ways to conceal plumbing and wiring.
    Logs homes should be designed with shrinkage in mind, because the logs will shrink much more than wood in a framed house. Make sure all windows and doors are not binding in their frames. Usually a slot is cut in the header log and a plank is inserted to slide up into it as the logs compress.
    The roof should have plenty of overhang to protect the log ends. The ends are vulnerable to rotting, but there won't be much of that in a 3 yr old. Get the manufacturer's name if possible for research.
    IMO. they are more trouble than they are worth for everyone concerned.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,519

    Default Re: Log Homes

    All the comments above are great advice.

    As always, if you are not comfortable doing an inspection you should always state so to your client and let them find someone else. NO need to create yourself problems or grief for the client.

    rick


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Log Homes

    You also should check with your E&O insurance company if you carry it. Some companies specifically exclude log home inspections in their policies.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Log Homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Jarvis View Post
    You also should check with your E&O insurance company if you carry it. Some companies specifically exclude log home inspections in their policies.
    HI Scott, which ones?

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eau Claire, WI
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Log Homes

    Scott,

    I knew someone would ask that. I don't know of any companies by name. We were told that at a cont. ed. session a few years back by log home inspector that inspects all over the country. He told us if we do log homes, to check with our E&O for coverage. I use that as a reason not to do a log home inspection. With the huge costs associated with repairs on these homes, I don't want to get involved.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    2,446

    Default Re: Log Homes

    I am renewing my policy and a new company has log homes on the application. It only asks if we inspect them, not that they don't cover them.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Log Homes

    "I am renewing my policy and a new company has log homes on the application. It only asks if we inspect them, not that they don't cover them."

    If an insurance company ask a question, and you answer "Yes", your rates just went up.

    Examples:

    Have you used tobacco in the last 5 years? Yes = higher rates
    Do you have any driving violations? Yes= higher rates
    Have you filed a claim?
    Do you use your personal vehicle at work?
    Do you inspect log homes?
    Have you...?
    Do you...?
    Will you...?

    You get the idea.
    They rarely ask a question that would lower your rates.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
    Posts
    5,847

    Default Re: Log Homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Jarvis View Post
    Scott,

    I knew someone would ask that. I don't know of any companies by name. We were told that at a cont. ed. session a few years back by log home inspector that inspects all over the country. He told us if we do log homes, to check with our E&O for coverage. I use that as a reason not to do a log home inspection. With the huge costs associated with repairs on these homes, I don't want to get involved.
    Gotcha, more home inspector folklore.

    Repair cost have little to do with the cost of E&O coverage. If this was the case don't you think that EIFS, stucco, faux stone (not just an EIFS inspection) as a cladding would be disclaimed as well. If you inspect a home that has EIFS, stucco, faux stone, etc... all of the E&O carriers will cover you. But, if you just do an EIFS, stucco, stone, etc., inspection they will most likely not cover you.

    It has more to do with the small risk pool of home inspectors. The smaller the pool the higher the rate.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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