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  1. #1
    Jonathan Jones's Avatar
    Jonathan Jones Guest

    Default CO or fire detector?

    Can anyone identify whether this device mounted on the ceiling in the kitchen area of a home built in the '90's is a CO sensor or part of a fire detection system?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Jones View Post
    Can anyone identify whether this device mounted on the ceiling in the kitchen area of a home built in the '90's is a CO sensor or part of a fire detection system?

    That looks like a Heat detector.
    If so, then it is a component of an alarm system, likely to also contain smoke detectors.
    Heat detectors are most often 3"-6" round.
    Most heat detectors are not testable, and cannot be reset (one time use only).
    I cannot tell from the picture, but it should indicate if it is 135 degree (for use in the living areas and garage/ storage), or 195 degree (for use in attics).

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    That looks like a Heat detector.
    If so, then it is a component of an alarm system, likely to also contain smoke detectors.
    Heat detectors are most often 3"-6" round.
    Most heat detectors are not testable, and cannot be reset (one time use only).
    I cannot tell from the picture, but it should indicate if it is 135 degree (for use in the living areas and garage/ storage), or 195 degree (for use in attics).
    Don't heat detectors tell you when it is too late to run, that it is time to just curl up in a corner and kiss your butt goodbye?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    Don't heat detectors tell you when it is too late to run, that it is time to just curl up in a corner and kiss your butt goodbye?
    Something like that
    An alarm company wanted me to install only a heat detector in a house for thier customer, I told them "You'll have four dead people before it goes off".

    Anyhow, heat detectors are useful where you should not use a smoke detector, ie. attic, garage, kitchen, very dusty areas.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']This is a Replaceable-element fixed-temperature heat detector.
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif'] [/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']Iíve read a complaint litigated during the 1980s on how heat detectors were pushed onto consumers over smoke detectors. Seems they lost out.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']Recommendation: Ensure that the home has the minimum required smoke detectors in the home and do not rely solely on heat detectors.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif'] [/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif'](1) In nearly all residential fires, life endangering conditions will[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']occur prior to the activation of respondent' s heat detectors. Such heat[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']detectors, therefore, do not provide sufficient warning to occupants in the event of fire.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif'](2) Respondent's fire alarm systems combining heat detectors and[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']smoke detectors do not provide significantly greater fire warning[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']protection for occupants than smoke detectors alone.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif'] [/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']FIGGIE INTERNATIONAL, INC.[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']FINAL ORDER IN REGARD TO ALLEGED VIOLATION OF SEC. 5 OF THE[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ACT[/FONT]
    [FONT='Arial','sans-serif']Docket 9166. Complaint, May 1983-Final Order, April , 1986[/FONT]
    [/FONT]


  6. #6
    Jonathan Jones's Avatar
    Jonathan Jones Guest

    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    Thank you very much, Rick.


  7. #7
    Jonathan Jones's Avatar
    Jonathan Jones Guest

    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    Thank you very much, Henrey


  8. #8
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    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    If it is a heat detector, it should be connected to a bell or horn to alert the occupants inside the residence in the event of an activation. You should be able to find a fire alarm control panel or a notification device somewhere in the house. If not, it may not be hooked up anymore. Some heat detectors are restorable, some are not. It's hard to tell with this device, I haven't seen one like this before. It looks old. Were you able to find any markings on it at all?


  9. #9
    Jonathan Jones's Avatar
    Jonathan Jones Guest

    Default Re: CO or fire detector?

    Thanks for your response. There were not any markings on the device however, we were able to confirm that it is a heat sensor connected to an old alarm system.


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