Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: Hallways

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Hallways

    One more trip down memory lane in search of a clearer definition of a hallway. I realize that the IRC has no definition. The IBC has one for corridor, but that can get downright confusing if one reads it more than once. Okay, even once.

    What I would like to clarify is this:

    (1) This is a single-family residential dwelling under 2006 IRC.
    (2) The hallways - or what any reasonable person would refer to as hallways - are 36" in width except for areas where they narrow to 32" or less at arch-topped openings cased with drywall.
    (3) The designer and builder are arguing that these are "passageways" between different sections of the hallways. WTF?

    I need a hammer.

    Inspection Referral
    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Miller View Post
    One more trip down memory lane in search of a clearer definition of a hallway. I realize that the IRC has no definition. The IBC has one for corridor, but that can get downright confusing if one reads it more than once. Okay, even once.

    What I would like to clarify is this:

    (1) This is a single-family residential dwelling under 2006 IRC.
    (2) The hallways - or what any reasonable person would refer to as hallways - are 36" in width except for areas where they narrow to 32" or less at arch-topped openings cased with drywall.
    (3) The designer and builder are arguing that these are "passageways" between different sections of the hallways. WTF?

    I need a hammer.
    Are all your doors 36" wide?
    I don't see the problem.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    Are all your doors 36" wide?
    I don't see the problem.
    No doors. Just narrowing of the hallway.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Columbus GA
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Miller View Post
    No doors. Just narrowing of the hallway.
    I understand.
    Fine line, but according to code, I still do not see a problem.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Miller View Post
    One more trip down memory lane in search of a clearer definition of a hallway. I realize that the IRC has no definition. The IBC has one for corridor, but that can get downright confusing if one reads it more than once. Okay, even once.

    What I would like to clarify is this:

    (1) This is a single-family residential dwelling under 2006 IRC.
    (2) The hallways - or what any reasonable person would refer to as hallways - are 36" in width except for areas where they narrow to 32" or less at arch-topped openings cased with drywall.
    (3) The designer and builder are arguing that these are "passageways" between different sections of the hallways. WTF?

    I need a hammer.
    Aaron,

    "(3) The designer and builder are arguing that these are "passageways" between different sections of the hallways."

    Tell them that a "hallway" is a "passageway" to get from one room or area to another room or area, and that the "passageway hallway" has a minimum required width of 3 feet, which, by the way, is slightly greater than 914 mm (914 millimeter = 35.984 251 969 inches ... give or take ).

    Now, if they want to call those arches of reduced size "doorways", then the code allows the non-required egress doors to be smaller than 3 feet in width and lower than 6 feet 8 inches in height (don't go there ), and, in which case they need to install the "doors" in order to apply that smaller dimension. Then add that, with each door, each "passageway hallway" becomes a separate space and the placement and location of smoke detectors and CO detectors may be affected.

    If they wanted those arches then they should have made the "passageway hallway" wide enough so that the reduced sizes of the arches meet the 3 feet minimum width.

    You can't fix stupid, but ... you can sedate it - use your hammer.


    pas·sage·way noun \-,wā\
    Definition of PASSAGEWAY
    : a way that allows passage
    See passageway defined for English-language learners »
    See passageway defined for kids »
    Examples of PASSAGEWAY
    <the passageway to the other side of the office>
    First Known Use of PASSAGEWAY
    circa 1606
    Related to PASSAGEWAY
    Synonyms: concourse, corridor, gallery, hallway, passage, hall

    syn·o·nym noun \ˈsi-nə-ˌnim\

    Definition of SYNONYM
    1
    : one of two or more words or expressions of the same language that have the same or nearly the same meaning in some or all senses
    2
    a : a word or phrase that by association is held to embody something (as a concept or quality) <a tyrant whose name has become a synonym for oppression>
    b : metonym
    3
    : one of two or more scientific names used to designate the same taxonomic group — compare homonym

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 08-14-2012 at 05:19 PM. Reason: added synonym definition just for clarity :-)
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Hallways

    "Direct access" from all habital areas to the required "exit door" probably why the 32" doors (burglar gtes, iron bar doors, etc.) were removed from the "hallway" when the floor plan was reconfigured.
    R311.4.1 Exit door required.

    Not less than one exit door conforming to this section shall be provided for each dwelling unit. The required exit door shall provide for direct access from the habitable portions of the dwelling to the exterior without requiring travel through a garage. Access to habitable levels not having an exit in accordance with this section shall be by a ramp in accordance with Section R311.6 or a stairway in accordance with Section R311.5.
    R311.1 General.

    Stairways, ramps, exterior egress balconies, hallways and doors shall comply with this section


    3 ft minimum width for the hallway. R311.3

    R311.3 Hallways.
    The minimum width of a hallway shall be not less than 3 feet (914 mm).


    7 feet height requirement for hallways. R305 Ceiling Height:

    R305.1 Minimum height.

    Habitable rooms, hallways, corridors, bathrooms, toilet rooms, laundry rooms and basements shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet (2134 mm). The required height shall be measured from the finish floor to the lowest projection from the ceiling.

    Exceptions:
    1. Beams and girders spaced not less than 4 feet (1219 mm) on center may project not more than 6 inches (152 mm) below the required ceiling height.
    2. Ceilings in basements without habitable spaces may project to within 6 feet, 8 inches (2032 mm) of the finished floor; and beams, girders, ducts or other obstructions may project to within 6 feet 4 inches (1931 mm) of the finished floor.
    3. For rooms with sloped ceilings, at least 50 percent of the required floor area of the room must have a ceiling height of at least 7 feet (2134 mm) and no portion of the required floor area may have a ceiling height of less than 5 feet (1524 mm).
    4. Bathrooms shall have a minimum ceiling height of 6 feet 8 inches (2036 mm) over the fixture and at the front clearance area for fixtures as shown in Figure R307.1. A shower or tub equipped with a showerhead shall have a minimum ceiling height of 6 feet 8 inches (2036 mm) above a minimum area 30 inches (762 mm) by 30 inches (762 mm) at the showerhead.



    Required exit door opens to clear 3-ft width and 6'8" in height.

    Refer to definitions in the ICC's IFC and PMC, as you are refered to in the IRC, first most definitions (what IS a means of egress, what IS an exit door, etc.) and requirements are in the IFC pertaining to the Means of Egress. Most repeated in the 2006 IBC at 1002.1

    SECTION R102 APPLICABILITY

    R102.1 General.

    Where, in any specific case, different sections of this code specify different materials, methods of construction or other requirements, the most restrictive shall govern. Where there is a conflict between a general requirement and a specific requirement, the specific requirement shall be applicable

    R102.4 Referenced codes and standards.
    The codes and standards referenced in this code shall be considered part of the requirements of this code to the prescribed extent of each such reference. Where differences occur between provisions of this code and referenced codes and standards, the provisions of this code shall apply.

    Exception: Where enforcement of a code provision would violate the conditions of the listing of the equipment or appliance, the conditions of the listing and manufacturer’s instructions shall apply.
    R102.7 Existing structures.

    The legal occupancy of any structure existing on the date of adoption of this code shall be permitted to continue without change, except as is specifically covered in this code, the International Property Maintenance Code or the International Fire Code, or as is deemed necessary by the building official for the general safety and welfare of the occupants and the public.
    R102.7.1 Additions, alterations or repairs.

    Additions, alterations or repairs to any structure shall conform to the requirements for a new structure without requiring the existing structure to comply with all of the requirements of this code, unless otherwise stated. Additions, alterations or repairs shall not cause an existing structure to become unsafe or adversely affect the performance of the building.
    R201.3 Terms defined in other codes.

    Where terms are not defined in this code such terms shall have meanings ascribed to them as in other code publications of the International Code Council.

    R201.4 Terms not defined.

    Where terms are not defined through the methods authorized by this section, such terms shall have ordinarily accepted meanings such as the context implies


    There is no narrowing allowed between a habital area (from its door, if applicable, said door of unspecified width - not required to be 36" wide) in the direct access to the required exit door less than 36" wide except the specific encroachments within the means of egress section 311 for stairways and rampways. You will find some of these defintions repeated and outlined in the 2006 IBC at 1002.1 Habital space is defined in the IBC t 202 as: "HABITABLE SPACE. A space in a building for living, sleeping, eating or cooking. Bathrooms, toilet rooms, closets, halls, storage or utility spaces and similar areas are not considered habitable spaces."

    Its not an "EXIT PASSAGEWAY" unless it has opening protectives as well as being of fire resistant construction. Passageways need DOORS, the hallway minimum width encroaching arches you describe are lacking same.

    IF there is habital space off of or at the end of this "hallway" and this "hallway" is the direct access means of egress to required "exit door(s)", these encroachments in the width of the hallway are not allowed, esp. btwn sleeping room delinating privacy door and the exit door(s).

    The IBC definition for corridor makes sense if you remember that the IBC system for a means of egress includes defined "exit" portions between "exit access" and "exit discharge" and "exit" portions are required fire resistant construction. Average IRC home (without an attched garage) means of egress system usually consists of exit access direct to exit door to exit discharge skipping the exit (fire resistant construction way to termination) componant., hall is more of an IBC aisle, SEE the IFC definition of "corridor" (Ch. 10 2006 IFC) it is more applicable to all including IRC construction, but remember the IFC defers to the IRC "mens of egress system" where allowed. see at: Chapter 10 - Means of Egress . Egress from non-habital (but occupied) space doesn't have the same requirements as habital spaces in IRC.

    Hall = hall-way.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 08-14-2012 at 06:19 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Cantrell View Post
    I understand.
    Fine line, but according to code, I still do not see a problem.
    No fine line. Just 36" minimum width.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    You can't fix stupid, but ... you can sedate it - use your hammer.
    JP: Amen.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    Hall = hall-way.
    HG: It may interest some, who do not already know, that the original meaning of the English word hall was house. That would make us hall inspectors. In this instance that applies.

    Thanks to your and JP's comments I now have the makings for a hammer to use on this builder. I will assemble it and fly it by all here for the usual scathingly edifying commentary.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    This is what I decided to go with. I am now putting my helmet on . . .


    The hallways in this house, though not so designated by the design firm in the design drawings as such, are in fact just that. While there is no definition of the term hallway in the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) which was adopted by this municipality at the time of permitting the construction of this house, IRC R201.4 states, “Terms not defined. Where terms are not defined through the methods authorized in this section, such terms shall have ordinarily accepted meanings such as the context applies.”

    It is reasonable to assume that the average person in this country understands that a hallway is a passageway or corridor between rooms in a building. In fact, it is so defined in American English dictionaries and thesauruses.

    IRC 311.3 states, “Hallways. The minimum width of a hallway shall be not less than 3 feet (914 mm).” It follows that all passageways or corridors – hallways – between rooms in a single-family residence built in compliance with the 2006 version of the IRC must be a minimum of 36” in width.

    The designer charged with designing this house appears to indicate in his/her design drawing that the hallways are to be narrowed to less than 3 feet in width in several locations by indicating the requirement for 2-8 (32”) arched openings. These include the hallways that connect the garage and kitchen, the study/media room and family room, the nook and gathering room, and the pub and master suite.

    It is also important to note that the builder and/or his contractors have apparently chosen to narrow these openings to even less than 32” in width on both sides of the fireplace separating the nook and the gathering room.

    Any hallway that is at any given point narrower than the required 36” constitutes an emergency egress impediment and is therefore a life safety hazard.

    It is reasonable to assume that the parties responsible for the creation and allowance of these hazards in this home include the design firm, the builder, the builder’s contractors, and the municipal inspection department.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Miller View Post
    This is what I decided to go with. I am now putting my helmet on . . .
    Aaron,

    I would change the wording to go along with their "designer's thinking" mentality ... something like this:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    The passageways - (which are more commonly known by the synonym "hallways" ) - designated by the design firm as "passageways" on the design drawings for this house, are in fact, one and the same thing as "hallways".

    Here is another example of designers using terms which seem to imply something different than what something is more commonly known by: "lanai", which is a fancy name for a "veranda", which is a fancy name for a "porch" - nonetheless, though, they are all simply different names for the same thing ... just like "passageway" is simply a different name for "hallway".

    While there is no definition of the terms "hallway" or "passageway" in the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) which was adopted by this municipality at the time of permitting the construction of this house, IRC R201.4 states, “Terms not defined. Where terms are not defined through the methods authorized in this section, such terms shall have ordinarily accepted meanings such as the context applies.” I.e., a "lanai" is a "veranda" is a "porch", and a "passageway" is a "passage" is a "hall" is a "hallway". Designers, builders, architects, etc., like to use fanciful terms while describing ordinary objects and areas as fanciful terms evoke memories of times when those terms indicated something above and beyond the ordinary, such as "vās" or "vāz" instead of "vase".

    It is reasonable to assume that the average person in this country understands that a hallway is a hall, which is a passageway or a passage between rooms in a building. In fact, it is so defined in American English dictionaries and thesauruses.

    IRC 311.3 states, “Hallways. The minimum width of a hallway shall be not less than 3 feet (914 mm).” It follows that all passageways or corridors – hallways – between rooms in a single-family residence built in compliance with the 2006 version of the IRC must be a minimum of 36” in width.

    The designer charged with designing this house appears to indicate in his/her design drawing that the hallways/passageways are to be narrowed to less than 3 feet in width in several locations by showing a requirement for several architectural features shown as having a clear opening width of only 32” between the sides of the arches instead of the required minimum width of 36". These architectural feature arches are shown in the hallways which connect the garage and kitchen, the study/media room and family room, the nook and gathering room, and the pub and master suite.

    It is also important to note that the builder and/or his contractors have apparently chosen to narrow these openings to even less than 32” in width on both sides of the fireplace separating the nook and the gathering room.

    Any hallway that, at any given point, is narrower than the required minimum width of 36” constitutes an emergency egress impediment and is therefore a life safety hazard.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I didn't change much ... how does the above read?

    It is reasonable to assume that the parties responsible for the creation and allowance of these hazards in this home include the design firm, the builder, the builder’s contractors, and the municipal inspection department.[/QUOTE]

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    JP:

    Though that bird had already flown, I thank you for the further insight. It might be a stretch, however, to assume the existence of the concept "designer thinking" in the context of residential buildings in Texas. Here, the homes are designed solely by bean counters for unsophisticated slaves to fashion trained with bananas, innertubes, and TVs.

    I fear that it is so everywhere . . .

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Stacy, MN
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Hallways

    The 36" minimum hallway width in residential construction is not necessarily for egress purposes, it's for the movement of furniture and appliances. If it was for egress, the opening width of all the doors in the home would also be regulated.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Weck View Post
    The 36" minimum hallway width in residential construction is not necessarily for egress purposes, it's for the movement of furniture and appliances. If it was for egress, the opening width of all the doors in the home would also be regulated.
    Fred,

    "The 36" minimum hallway width in residential construction is not necessarily for egress purposes ... " In that case, maybe the hallways should be 48" wide to better accommodate furniture and movement of same.

    However, that 36" is for egress ... :
    - SECTION R311
    - - MEANS OF EGRESS
    - - - R311.1 General. Stairways, ramps, exterior egress balconies,
    hallways and doors shall comply with this section.
    - - - R311.2 Construction.
    - - - - - R311.2.1 Attachment. Required exterior egress balconies,
    exterior exit stairways and similar means of egress
    components shall be positively anchored to the primary
    structure to resist both vertical and lateral forces. Such
    attachment shall not be accomplished by use of toenails or
    nails subject to withdrawal.
    - - - - - R311.2.2 Under stair protection. Enclosed accessible space
    under stairs shall have walls, under stair surface and any soffits
    protected on the enclosed sidewith 1/2-inch (13 mm) gypsum
    board.
    - - - R311.3 Hallways. The minimum width of a hallway shall be
    not less than 3 feet (914 mm).
    - - - R311.4 Doors.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Stacy, MN
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Hallways

    From the IRC Code Commentary:
    "Hallways must be a minimum of 3 feet wide to accommodate moving furniture into rooms off the hallway and for safe egress from the structure."

    I agree, 48" would be better. But, the builder could replace those arched openings with a 2-0 door and no longer be in violation of the code.

    Don't want to get in a pi$$ing match, just saying that there is more than one way to look at it. The code is a minimum and can't always cover stupid or the lack of common sense.


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Weck View Post
    From the IRC Code Commentary:
    "Hallways must be a minimum of 3 feet wide to accommodate moving furniture into rooms off the hallway and for safe egress from the structure."

    I agree, 48" would be better. But, the builder could replace those arched openings with a 2-0 door and no longer be in violation of the code.

    Don't want to get in a pi$$ing match, just saying that there is more than one way to look at it. The code is a minimum and can't always cover stupid or the lack of common sense.
    This is the main reason and why it is listed under R311 Means of Egress instead of R304 Minimum Room Areas.

    "and for safe egress from the structure"

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  17. #17
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
    Darrel Hood Guest

    Default Re: Hallways

    It sounds like you are describing a series of short hall ways joined end to end.


  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Darrel Hood View Post
    It sounds like you are describing a series of short hall ways joined end to end.
    Yes, much like any Texas builder's story: a series of short lies joined end to end.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  19. #19
    John Cox's Avatar
    John Cox Guest

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Miller View Post
    Yes, much like any Texas builder's story: a series of short lies joined end to end.
    A doorway is not defined as necessitating a panel. Therefore the archways can be thought of as doorways. Code does not specify minimum doorway width for residential, unless ADA or primary egress (front door) therefore the archways may reduce down to whatever they want.

    In the IBC for buildings, "aisles" are more close in nature to residential "hallways" rather than "corridors", which would be directly attached to an exit enclosure. Also, corridors must be rated, only by exception may that be reduced. And corridors serve certain functions in buildings that contain them. Therefore a "hallway" can be thought of as a "aisle" with walls on either side. In the IBC there is an exception for doorways in complying with aisle width. Also, aisles are part of exit access, which is also in accordance with what a hallway would be in a house. So, in following suit, one could say that a hallway can be reduced in width at doorway locations.

    I agree with the IRC commentary that one of the reasons for the 36" minimum hallway width is that doorways will open up onto the hallway from either side, in addition to the safe egress purpose. The code does not specify minimum widths at these adjacent door locations, other than the 36" for the hallway.

    The reduction of hallway at doors does not pose a safety risk. Only concern is on behalf of owner with respect to being able to move furniture in and out.





    I feel that if it were the designer's intent and the owner is in agree-ance then reducing the hallway width by installing the doorways is acceptable to the code and does not pose a hazard. Only thing it does is reduce


  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by John Cox View Post
    A doorway is not defined as necessitating a panel. Therefore the archways can be thought of as doorways. Code does not specify minimum doorway width for residential, unless ADA or primary egress (front door) therefore the archways may reduce down to whatever they want.

    In the IBC for buildings, "aisles" are more close in nature to residential "hallways" rather than "corridors", which would be directly attached to an exit enclosure. Also, corridors must be rated, only by exception may that be reduced. And corridors serve certain functions in buildings that contain them. Therefore a "hallway" can be thought of as a "aisle" with walls on either side. In the IBC there is an exception for doorways in complying with aisle width. Also, aisles are part of exit access, which is also in accordance with what a hallway would be in a house. So, in following suit, one could say that a hallway can be reduced in width at doorway locations.

    I agree with the IRC commentary that one of the reasons for the 36" minimum hallway width is that doorways will open up onto the hallway from either side, in addition to the safe egress purpose. The code does not specify minimum widths at these adjacent door locations, other than the 36" for the hallway.

    The reduction of hallway at doors does not pose a safety risk. Only concern is on behalf of owner with respect to being able to move furniture in and out.





    I feel that if it were the designer's intent and the owner is in agree-ance then reducing the hallway width by installing the doorways is acceptable to the code and does not pose a hazard. Only thing it does is reduce
    The IRC does not define the term "doorway", just as it does not define "hall" or "hallway". The dictionary (and common sense) does: doorway - an entrance to a room or building through a door; hallway - an area in a building onto which rooms open; a corridor. With the possible exception of a builder looking for an excuse to save money or bow to the dictates of a code-ignorant designer, all of the rest of us understand what a hallway and doorway are without any additional thought required.

    The requirement for a clear 36" width is to allow for safe emergency egress. Any narrowing of the 3-ft. requirement necessarily decreases safety and flies in the face of the administrative dictates set forth in IRC 101.3, 102.1, et al.

    Following your line of "reasoning", I suppose that it would be just fine to encroach on the 36"" width requirement by hanging wall cabinets in stairwells . . . =-)

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Hallways

    To expand on Aaron's post and expand John's position ...

    ... according to John's position one could install an "arch" or "archway" such that the opening between the sides of the arch is 1 inch wide ... that position and thinking does not work with the hall/hallway being the egress path (doesn't work for other reasons too).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Hallways

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    To expand on Aaron's post and expand John's position ...

    ... according to John's position one could install an "arch" or "archway" such that the opening between the sides of the arch is 1 inch wide ... that position and thinking does not work with the hall/hallway being the egress path (doesn't work for other reasons too).
    Thanks JP.

    Texas Inspector
    http://www.texasinspector.com
    What the plainspoken man lacks in subtlety, he makes up in clarity.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Hallways

    No problem, Aaron - I tried to keep it short and sweet - too many other fallacies/misconceptions in John's post to try to address them all.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •