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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Flintville, TN
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    12

    Thumbs down Concrete slab or footer?

    In a new and being constructed home that has required footers, also have footers in the middle of basement to hold posts. My question is: Can the concrete slab be poured first and THEN build the posts and bearing walls on top of the the slab over footers or do I have to build right to the footer.

    Also there is a large front porch that is going to be concrete slab but is also serving as a safety room ceiling below, can the brick on the front porch start at the slab or does it have to start at footer/brick ledge and pour slab after brick is installed? Just not quite sure of sequence order

    Thanks for any help!

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
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    4,549

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Set the posts and walls right on the footers.

    What you 'have to' do depends on the authority in your area, if you have one. But standard practice is usually the best. Pour all your footings. Pour the slab up to the footings. Expect shrinkage and cracking where the slab meets the footings.
    Slab and footings can be done together in one pour, but since you are asking here, go the conventional route that is proven.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,777

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Typically a footer should be resting on undisturbed earth.
    Typically a slab is not pored on undisturbed earth but over stone, sand an other materials.
    Footers and slab can be pored as a monolith pore depending local codes.
    At times the foundation wall must be tied to the footers using rebar.
    Typically the wall plat has to be bolted to the slab.

    Helps I hope. Though I may be seeing an elephant in your description of a camel.

    Go to local permit/inspection office and they should be able to answer your code question.

    Last edited by Garry Sorrells; 11-11-2012 at 03:54 PM. Reason: additional thought

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    4,086

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    I can only guess, but is the reference to a "safety room" under the "porch slab" is a storm shelter from the regular tornados through the area?

    NWS LIncoln County TN Tornado Sort

    Not even sure what you're actually asking about, since so much is ambiguously undefined, such as what kind of slab ...topography...geography, ...what's being built, etc.

    Most should be available with geo tech & stamped plans from lic. des. pro.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    Posts
    4,170

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Unless you have a monolithic slab (rare) the slab needs isolation joints around piers and the footers. The slab needs to be able to move freely due to the different attributes of the different types of bearing.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Memphis TN.
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    4,311

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    Unless you have a monolithic slab (rare) .
    Most Common used in New Construction ( past 40 years ) in my area.
    * but we also have some old crawls and a very few ( pre 1920's ) basements.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Plano, Texas
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    4,170

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Stephens View Post
    Most Common used in New Construction ( past 40 years ) in my area.
    * but we also have some old crawls and a very few ( pre 1920's ) basements.
    Yes, 99 % of what I see but then we don't have many basements.
    I would suspect a monolithic slab poured with the basement walls would be a rare creature indeed.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Memphis TN.
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    4,311

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    I would suspect a monolithic slab poured with the basement walls would be a rare creature indeed.
    Got it.
    Poured Basement floor is not a foundation slab, it's just a floor.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    Yes, you can pour the basement floor on top of the footing pads already poured. Nothing wrong with that. You will need to fasten the posts to the floor and your beam.
    The porch can also be poured first as long as the concrete extends directly on the brick ledge. The only problem could arise would be if something happen to the porch slab. You would also need to remove the brick to pour a new porch. Don't forget to flash on top of the porch and under the brick. We always used a rubber roofing membrane under the slab when a room is below.

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Hercules, CA
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: Concrete slab or footer?

    I recommend that the building be designed, or at least reviewed, by a Registered Civil/Structural Engineer, especially with free spanning concrete slabs and masonry/brick walls. The Engineer should also field inspect for proper construction.

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

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