Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    7

    Default Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    hello again...

    Commercial Insurance (Loss Control) Inspector here...fist time in 6 years I have encountered this...a coffee make in a sleeping room (rooming house). Is it considered a hot plate? And is so, what code could I cite?

    thanx,


    dox

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,244

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    A couple of questions:

    - Do you have a photo of the coffee maker?

    - Why would you consider a coffer maker a hot plate? (Maybe the photo would answer that?)

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    it has a flat cooking surface containing a heating element


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,449

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    A lot of things have heating elements. (curling irons, hair dryers, soldering irons, Easy bake ovens, reptile terrariums, etc.)

    If it's UL listed and labeled as a "coffee maker", it's not a "cooking surface", and it's not a "hot plate".

    Dom.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,244

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Forman View Post
    it has a flat cooking surface containing a heating element
    If you are describing what I am envisioning, it has one, two, maybe even three four "warming" plates that glass coffee decanter are placed on to keep the coffee warm.

    As Dom said, those are not "not plates".

    Is someone using that as a hot plate? Maybe, but that doesn't make it a hot plate anymore than sleeping in a recliner chair makes the recliner chair a bed.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    As Dom said, those are not "not plates"
    look fellas...

    the definition of hot plate is 'flat cooking surface containing a heating element'.

    The context here is that of a general liability insurance inspection, in a rooming house. sleeping rooms are not permitted to have hot plates, of any sort; and if the above definition doesn't describe a coffee maker, I don't know what does. generally speaking, If the occupant leaves the room w/ the coffee maker still on, it seemed to me that would constitute a fairly large liability issue.

    I thought maybe someone here had some experience w/ this subject...or could provide some code reference, that's all...'cause on it's face value, a determination of that sort 'does' seem like an overzealous one. wasn't attempting to ruffle ay feathers...sorry

    dox


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,244

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Forman View Post
    look fellas...

    the definition of hot plate is 'flat cooking surface containing a heating element'.
    Mark,

    YOU said it was a "coffee maker".

    That's what we're going on.

    A "coffee maker" coffee warming surface is not "a cooking surface", you seem to be making a big deal out of nothing.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,244

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Forman View Post
    If the occupant leaves the room w/ the coffee maker still on, it seemed to me that would constitute a fairly large liability issue.
    If the occupant leaves the room and ANY appliance is left on (iron, coffeemaker, TV, computer) ... yes ... there is a risk.

    And if the insurance policy and rules state "no cooking" ... that's one thing (and yet another to enforce and catch, but if they state "no hot plates of any sort", then look up how "they" define "not plate" (was that the definition you gave?), and if it says "cooking" surface, a coffee maker keep warm surface is "not for cooking".

    If the definition says no "surface" with a heating element, then no coffee maker with a heated plate, no iron, not computer with a heat sink cooling surface, no etc.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,449

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Forman View Post
    I thought maybe someone here had some experience w/ this subject...or could provide some code reference, that's all...'cause on it's face value, a determination of that sort 'does' seem like an overzealous one. wasn't attempting to ruffle ay feathers...sorry

    dox
    No ruffled feathers, and I'm precise with what an underwriter requests.

    Coffee makers have been around for generations. If they thought they were a risk, it's be on their form or listed right next to "hot plate".

    I like to keep it simple.

    Dom.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    eastpoint fl
    Posts
    49

    Default Re: Coffee Makers...considered Hot Plates...???

    The functional difference:

    A teakettle or coffee maker heats a liquid (essentially water) and will not get hotter than 212 degrees f, so long as water is present. If it's working as designed, it would be really hard to start a fire with one of those.

    A hot plate working as designed gets hot enough to start a fire if paper or cloth comes in contact.

    It's reasonable to exclude one but permit the other.

    A failed coffee maker could indeed start a fire. So could a failed radio, or computer, or other electric powered device.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •