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  1. #1
    Jerome W. Young's Avatar
    Jerome W. Young Guest

    Default drywall installation

    Anyone have a rule of thumb or an industry standard for imperfections in drywall installation. I have a client on a $4 mil home that is not happy with imperfections in several areas of the drywall. Specifically where the drywall meets the base trim. The gaps were caulked in where the drywall is not flush to the trim and most areas are less that 1/4 in. He is not satisfied because he has seen better jobs on neighboring homes. This obviously was a punch list inspection on a new home. I dont know what the builder can do at this point if anything anyway. It seems to be alittle over the top , but maybe not.
    Thanks!

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Default Re: drywall installation

    On a 4 mil. home, they'd be tearing it out and replacing it to my satisfaction is what they'd be doing.

    For 4 mil. you ought to be getting quality craftmanship not spec. home type work.


  3. #3
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: drywall installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome W. Young View Post
    Anyone have a rule of thumb or an industry standard for imperfections in drywall installation. I have a client on a $4 mil home that is not happy with imperfections in several areas of the drywall. Specifically where the drywall meets the base trim. The gaps were caulked in where the drywall is not flush to the trim and most areas are less that 1/4 in.
    The easy solution, and it is done frequently, is to float the drywall out, where it is bowed inward away from the base, so that it is out flush with the top of the base.

    In a $4 mil home, it is up to the buyer to set the standards for cosmetic things (and that is cosmetic) ... all depending on their contract, of course.

    Residential contracts do not typically specify the "Level of Finish" for the drywall. It's more of 'what is expected' and 'what the buyer accepts'.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Jerome W. Young's Avatar
    Jerome W. Young Guest

    Default Re: drywall installation

    Thanks! good advice.


  5. #5
    John Allingham's Avatar
    John Allingham Guest

    Default Re: drywall installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The easy solution, and it is done frequently, is to float the drywall out, where it is bowed inward away from the base, so that it is out flush with the top of the base.

    What does that entail Jerry?


  6. #6
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    Default Re: drywall installation

    a bucket of joint compound and a trowel.


  7. #7
    Nolan Kienitz's Avatar
    Nolan Kienitz Guest

    Default Re: drywall installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    a bucket of joint compound and a trowel.
    ... and a "craftsman" who knows how to use the trowel and manipulate the joint compound.

    There are some out there, but they are not "cheap".


  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: drywall installation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    a bucket of joint compound and a trowel.

    "a bucket of joint compound and a ... " long straight edge, typically an aluminum angle, probably 2"x2"x1/4" by about 4'-6'-8' long (or longer).

    You need something relatively thin, strong, light weight, and straight - so you can span several studs and make the wall straight. I've seen two people working the 8'-12' long ones, sometimes it's more than just the drywall bowed in toward the stud cavity (16" to 24" width needs to be floated out), sometimes it's a stud set back in too far (32" to 48" or more needs to be floated out).

    Typically, this is only on higher end construction where higher end base (larger / fancier) was used, and the larger / fancier base does not bend and deflect to meet the wandering wall - the base stays straight, exposing that the wall does wander back and forth out of line.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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