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  1. #1
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    Default Commercial Kitchen Floor

    This isn't exactly HI related but I'm thinking somebody around here has an ansnwer.

    Are tiled commercial kitchen floors supposed to slope towards the drains to keep water from collecting like in a shower?

    I've always just thought the drains were in place to squeegie the water into when cleaning and don't necessarily have to slope. The tenant in a building my family owns is upset with the contractor that recently installed the floor and I was asked what the rule is, or if there even is one.


    Thanks!

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    As a PCO who has been in numerous kitchens in restaurants over the years I have seen floors sloped at the floor drains around sinks and dishwasher areas. Quite common.

    Last edited by Rick Hurst; 02-27-2008 at 04:55 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    This isn't exactly HI related but I'm thinking somebody around here has an ansnwer.

    Are tiled commercial kitchen floors supposed to slope towards the drains to keep water from collecting like in a shower?

    I've always just thought the drains were in place to squeegie the water into when cleaning and don't necessarily have to slope. The tenant in a building my family owns is upset with the contractor that recently installed the floor and I was asked what the rule is, or if there even is one.


    Thanks!
    What is the drain for? What did the contract or spec say about the drain?

    I don't know of any requirement in the IBC that would cover this. I think that this would need to be spelled out in the contract that the floor needs to slope X toward the floor drain.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Thanks guys - I'm pretty sure it wasn't addresed in the contract. I'm more looking for a requirement that it must slope to the drain. It doesn't sound like there is one.

    This is building that my wife's family owns and I've been elected to help look after it. We recently flipped tenants and had a major remodel done. The contractor the tenant hired is a total noodle and they have been at each other's throats the entire time. In this case, however, I don't she has anything to complain about.

    Here are a couple examples of his work -

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  5. #5
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Most tile setters that I've worked with will "pan" a 1'-3' sloped area around any floor drains be they in a kitchen, bathroom, food/drink prep station, behind bars or other areas where spillage or daily cleaning takes place. Mop or squeegee use depends on the size or area being cleared of liquids. Having the entire floor sloped to drains would need to have been speced in the prints and installers contract.

    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
    Commercial-Residential-Construction-EIFS-Infrared Thermography
    life is the random lottery of events followed by numerous narrow escapes

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Depends on where the drain is located.

    While the code does not specify that the floor be sloped to the drain, if the floor is sloped to the drain and the drain is out in the middle of the floor (like many are), the sloped floor could be hazardous to the health and fitness of employees.

    If the floor drain is under a sink, under a fixed in place center table, by all means, slope the floor to the drain.

    But to slope a main walking area is just not real safe.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    It really depends on the application. If it is a "wash down" prep area that gets hosed down on a regular basis, then the entire floor needs to be sloped, otherwise just the immediate area around the drains. Like others said, it would have to be spec'd in the plans or don't gripe.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Dallas, Texas

  8. #8
    Steve Lowery's Avatar
    Steve Lowery Guest

    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Here in California it is typical for the concrete crew to take a board 2' long & swing it around the drain, which is set 1/4'' or so below grade, to create a small shallow well for drainage. It's gradual enough that people don't trip. The commercial kitchens these are found in are usually so freaking greasy and wet that the slope is the least of the worries. Many of the floors my company does now call for epoxy floors that have several layers that have sand imbedded in them.


  9. #9
    Tim Moreira's Avatar
    Tim Moreira Guest

    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Sadly, most of the floor drains I've seen in hospital kitchens seem to slope away or the floors are level.

    Mostly the staff has to squeegee the water to the drains.

    I have seen in areas that are specifically "wash down areas", the floor was specified to slope in the plans as already stated.


  10. #10
    David Banks's Avatar
    David Banks Guest

    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Moreira View Post
    Sadly, most of the floor drains I've seen in hospital kitchens seem to slope away or the floors are level.

    Mostly the staff has to squeegee the water to the drains.

    I have seen in areas that are specifically "wash down areas", the floor was specified to slope in the plans as already stated.
    The problem is that it takes a skilled concrete finisher to properly slope the floor to a drain.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Veronika Dion View Post
    In many commercial kitchen ,I've seen laminate wood flooring.It is cheaper in price and best in quality.Try this out!!
    Laminate flooring in an area that will be exposed to washdowns or even simple, repeated heavy mopping? Can't really see that working out very well as the field of the floor as well as the perimeter of the area will probably not be sealed very well, if at all. Any water that penetrates the finished floor and intrudes at the substrate of the laminate flooring will quickly cause the material to delaminate.

    Alton Darty
    ATN Services, LLC
    www.arinspections.com

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Commercial Kitchen Floor

    "You can also try silikal. At Silikal we feel that not only is quality of product of the utmost importance but so is the installation of that product. That being said we do not allow just any contractor to install or flooring systems. Silikal as a quality commercial and industrial flooring manufacturer requires a quality licensed applicator to be used on the installation of our flooring products. Silikal- Expect more from your floor.
    "


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