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  1. #1
    Jon mackay's Avatar
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    Default Electric range clearances

    Is there a standard clearance for electric ranges?

    Obviously this is in need of correction but I was curious if there is a published standard.

    The manual I have (for another brand) does not specify when there is cabinetry or walls directly adjacent to the unit.

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  2. #2
    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    The manual I have (for another brand) does not specify when there is cabinetry or walls directly adjacent to the unit.
    What does the manual you have say? Can you scan it in, is it a digital file you can post, or do you have on online link to it?

    The installation instructions will tell what clearances are required.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    I believe you will find that a gas range will require 6 inch to side wall.
    Also, you may find that the manufacturing installation instructions for electric ranges are rated for 0 clearance but will recommend 6 inches to reduce steam and grease damage to a wall surface.

    Your pict of 20 inch elect range is a common installation due to limited space.

    I would recommend that the wall be covered in a noncombustible material, tile is easy quick option.


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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    The projecting-over-the-cooktop and electric elements Plate-rail on the wall is too low and overtop the two side burners. THIS is the issue, not the vertical wall, in general, presuming this is in a one-, two-family home. If this is in a "mobile home" there are other requirements regarding air space and proximity, securement, etc. esp. if a three-wire type unit.

    UL 858. Chapter 47, addresses surface unit setback.


    The manufacture date relative to the Listing Standard (for ex. UL 20", 24" or 30") depending upon the "edition cycle" of UL 858, and the protection and/or shielding present between combustibles and platform vertical above the surface of the elements for the entirety of the cooking platform upon the range top should be absolute clear space overtop the free standing, counter top height range.

    Projections overtop such as - combustible (wood plate rail, cabinetry if present, etc.) above should be shielded via intervening draft hood, metal shield, etc. otherwise absent for the area above for a minimum height, presently that height is 30" for unshielded. Unsure as to photo, but appears same plate rail on back wall encoraches over the rear projection of the range as well and the cooktop surface "zone", IF the range were properly leveled, plumbed, (appears to be leaning to the side wall, and tipped forward, in relationship to the wall, corner, and adjacent countertop and cabinet, but this may be lense distortion) it is obviously too far from the rear wall to be secured with safety anti-tip bracket type hardware.

    The type, size, spacing to sidewall, and proximity of the control knobs located below the cooking platform and upon on the face of the range so near the side edge(s) may define need for manufacturer's instructions to include additional (other than zero) sidewall clearance. Operating Controls are also addressed in the standard and cross referenced amongst other recognized componant listings.

    From Household Electric, Ranges UL Category Code KRMX (KRMX7 for canada) and the edition in place for same listed and produced today:

    Quote Originally Posted by UL KRMX.GuideInfo

    "The range with or without a warming tray located on the top of the back guard may be installed close against vertical walls at the back and at both sides and a top cabinet may be installed not less than "A" inches above the top of the cooking platform. See Dimension "A" in Fig. 1.
    1.
    FIG. 1




    Fig. 1: 1. Building back wall, 2. Top building cabinet, 3. Control panel, 4. Cooking surface, 5. Building side wall, 6. Oven, 7. Building side wall

    A = 30 in. minimum clearance between the top of the cooking platform and the bottom of an unprotected wood or metal cabinet; or A = 24 in. (not applicable when an electrically heated warming tray is provided on the back guard) when the bottom of the wood or metal cabinet is protected by not less than 1/4 in. flame retardant millboard covered with not less than No. 28 MSG sheet steel, 0.015 in. stainless steel, 0.024 in. aluminum or 0.020 in. copper."
    Side clearances, and proximity to vertical walls, if required or recommended, DEPEND ON MFG-Instructions, and vintage/age of manufacture. The insulation of the oven area, and the size, location, and rating of the electric coils. Recommendations regarding grease collections, side walls, etc. or shielding depend on mfg. Kitchen planning and design recommendations generally mention a minimum of 6-9 inches of free space or counter area adjacent on either side of a cook top area for ergonomics, maintenance, etc., for safety, ease of use, and avoidance of grease collections, splatter, etc. Unlike gas, Installation generally allows one side nearly abutted to side wall with oven door swing clearance. A heat shield easily cleaned, upon wall often "recommended" when same, also avoids grease soaked wall board.

    The "apartment size" range looks rather old, suspect the insulation may be less than ideal, and not at today's standards.

    In summary, the proximity to flat wall one side not of general concern, what is of concern is the projecting combustible plate rail and its overhang above the "cooking platform" (elements and top) unguarded/sheilded too close in vertical height to same. (i.e. unshielded, and within 20, 24, or at present 30 inches, overhanging the "cooking platform" area of the freestanding, countertop height, electric range -- assuming it is actually listed for HOUSEHOLD use, and for use in the US.

    A coil element on medium to high, uncovered; or an element covered by an empty or dry pot will "run away" in temp. Hot enough to melt the pot componants, and pyrolize the wood, pyrolized combustion at a lower temp.

    For starters, see: KRMX.GuideInfo - Ranges, Household Electric

    Did you look for the installation instructions & wiring diagram inside frame behind drawer or backside when you investigated the accessible electrical connection? (betting from apparent age and orientation in the photograph, there were no anti-tip safety brackets installed either).

    Additionally, the splatter collections, unknown prior absorption, etc. of the painted wall surface adjacent is worthy of note. Unkwn if oven door swing and possible contact with adjacent side wall was an issue as well. The oven door does not appear fully closed, or square to the opening (possibly side of handle caught or pinned against side wall. This may just be a photo effect of your camera angle and lense distortion. The range must be set level and plumb and the operative oven door and its handles swing clear a less-than-plumb side wall, and allow for full opening and removal of oven rack(s) pans, etc.

    The sub-category or TYPE of appliance is countertop height dependant. The appliance has further been installed improperly as relationship to the countertop height on the right. (run out level legs or shorten countertop height adjacent).

    Finally, the semi-flush, projecting, incorrectly "covered" exposed and projecting receptacle box and receptacle is a problem, both for the back-wall clearance proximity of the range requirements, and the electrical code. The face plate type and application is improper especially for the circumstances of the installation. The pictured receptacle is not "legal" as a countertop one, and is obviously not installed for a "clock" exception. It does not belong where it is - in relation to the cooking platform of the installed electric range. It is assumptively being used regularly to power the rice cooker set upon the adjacent countertop, and on a regular basis. This suggests/implies there is no required, and correctly installed GFCI protected receptacle above or within the backwall of the pictured right countertop and within 12" OC to the right of the electric range.

    The range should be positioned level and plumb, up to the backwall - and properly secured with anti-tip brackets and level at or slightly above any adjacent countertop surface. There should be no combustible or other projections to free air space above the overall cootop platform anywhere within at least 20" 24" or 30" inches depending on the vintage of the appliance, installation, and the characteristics of the projection (shielded, insulated, or otherwise, depending). IIRC at one time the lower minimum may have been 18" in certain situations exceptions quite some time ago.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 05-24-2011 at 08:49 AM.

  5. #5
    Jon mackay's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    What does the manual you have say? Can you scan it in, is it a digital file you can post, or do you have on online link to it?

    The installation instructions will tell what clearances are required.
    Jerry, I finally was able to scan what I have.
    Notice how the cabinets do not extend down to the stove.

    I recommended that clearances be improved at the stove area. Sure it is hard to get a good place to put the stove in the apartment but this was a bit too tight in my opinion.

    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Jon mackay; 05-26-2011 at 07:49 AM. Reason: added ttachment

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    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    Jerry, I finally was able to scan what I have.
    Notice how the cabinets do not extend down to the stove.
    Correct, as you pointed out (as did Watson) the clearance is vertically up alongside the sides of the range to a height of 30 inches minimum to combustible material.

    And that cabinets on either side aligned with the sides of the range must be at least 18" high above the countertop, that trim around the wall falls within the prohibited area of 30" wide by 30" high.

    Also note that if there is a wall on either side of the range above 36" in height (which is also the height of the range as shown in the drawing), that wall must be at least 1" back from the side of the range.

    Then there are upper cabinets above the range with maximum depth of 13".

    Notice that the dimensions of the range are somewhat inconsistent in that the bottom of the range is 29-7/8", the top is 30-1/8", and the width above the range is 30" minimum.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon mackay View Post
    Is there a standard clearance for electric ranges?

    Obviously this is in need of correction but I was curious if there is a published standard.

    The manual I have (for another brand) does not specify when there is cabinetry or walls directly adjacent to the unit.
    The document you scanned and the UL standard is not limited to wall or cabinetry, it also refers and excludes/prohibits that wood or any other projecting such as that corbel supported "plate rail" from being anywhere within the cooktop furface up to 30" above, and only allows insulated and shielded at the 24" elevation (within six inches below the 30" high zone).

    Yes, the scanned document you later provided for the 30" GE electric range DOES actually provide a sidewall/side cabinetry & countertop clearance of 1" for those areas beyond 36" up from floor up to 24" or 30" above the top of the cooking platform (60" if shielded and insulated or 66" if not, up from the floor). That side wall clearance is actually 1/4" LOWER than the lowest possible elevation not of the side edge but of the lower cooktop between the elements height, when the leveling legs have been not drilled down as close as possible to the frame of the range, but completely removed (unscrewed).

    There is always a limitation for that TYPE electric range for the surfaces/countertop adjacent to the cooking top surface to not EXCEED the elevation of the cook top platform, they are generally always to be below the highest sidewall of the unit projection (and higher than the lowest pot or pan bottom as placed upon the range top elements). (this is further delinated within the details of the UL standard, and thus repeated in some form or diagram regarding installation and placement instructions by the manufacturer in the form of the instructions). In that case - the unit itself has a height when the leveling feet are removed from the frame case, not just "drilled down" to the frame completely of 36-1/4" to the highest arc of the raised edge of the cooktop to the sidewall of the range - that would be for your scanned document's model 36" up from the floor point of sidewall, cabinetry, or projection - one-inch clearance zone beyond the above-the-cooking top surface area 24" to 30" free clearance area.

    It (your scanned document for an unrelated to the photographed electric range) indicates 1" clearance side wall or cabinetry clearance for the sides from a 36" elevation up from the floor (which is 1/4" lower than the highest point of the raised rolled edge at the cooking top side platform at the sides) and higher to a height 30" above the cooking platform, that are not insulated as indicated and shielded with sheet metal as indicated. For those areas properly insulated and shielded that sidewall/side cabinetry clearance of 1" is reduced to a height from 1/4" below the cooking surface to 24" above. It further indicates a zero clearance backwall is possible when the electrical box is situated precisely where indicated on the backwall near the floor.

    The underside (bottom) of the exposed open elements would be above the 36" limit abutting the range sidewall when the range is installed sitting on leveling legs installed in the frame but "drilled down" completely to the range frame.


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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    When are you guys going to talk about the Electric RO behind the stove top, or did I miss that?

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry McCarthy View Post
    When are you guys going to talk about the Electric RO behind the stove top, or did I miss that?
    Yep, you missed that. Second to last paragraph of my post #4, already addressed.


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    Default Re: Electric range clearances

    Sorry HG, I have the attention span of a ferret after downing a double expresso.

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

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