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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Central Washington
    Posts
    21

    Default Child proof switches

    I just received an e mail from a client, who informed me, that a dishwasher that I was unable to turn on had a child proof switch to disable it from accidental operation.

    Client stated I washed my dishes in the sink for 3 weeks before
    calling a repair man. It only took a few seconds and $70 for him to turn the "child proof" switch off.

    Not complaining....just sharing my new discovery that I thought you might benefit from.


    Has anybody encountered this safety switch with dishwashers or any other appliance?

    Who can explain where these switches are located or how to identify them?

    I have encountered some dishwashers that would only operate with their soap dish closed.

    Thoughts, experiences and knowledge are appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Chip Roberson


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    745

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    Probably just a light switch on the backsplash out of reach from a small child.


  3. #3
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    I got this off the net. looks like you need the owners book on each unit.

    Its in the codes on the door or the display panel. look for the funny face.

    Best

    Ron


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Charlotte NC
    Posts
    2,303

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    In my area all of the new installatiions have a wall switch, usually next to the garbage disposal switch. I don't know if it is a new code requirement?

    I've heard its a "child" thing, but I can't figure that out either? I couldn't get my kids anywhere near the dishes!


  5. #5
    MaMa Mount's Avatar
    MaMa Mount Guest

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    Chip,

    Those are common in the newer homes and are a safety switch for the dishwasher. Guess you didn't hear of the case last year when a child died inside a dishwasher. A switch as such could have saved that child life, possibly.

    I am curious if you couldn't figure out how to run the dishwasher how did you describe to your client what that switch was to go to?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Central Washington
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    MaMa,

    The client was with me during the inspection. We both tried to operate the dishwasher, but were not successful.

    There was not an obvious or labeled cut off switch that we noticed.

    In the report I stated, Defective / inoperative in unit A. Recommend further review and repairs as needed by a qualified licensed contractor or specialty trades person dealing with this item or system.

    [MaMa...Guess you didn't hear of the case last year when a child died inside a dishwasher. A switch as such could have saved that child life, possibly.]

    Can you link me to this article?

    Thanks,

    Chip


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,519

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    Last year there was this thread on the subject that you might want to read on more about the dishwasher tragedy.
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...r-tragedy.html

    rick


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,365

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    Quote Originally Posted by MaMa Mount View Post
    Chip,

    Those are common in the newer homes and are a safety switch for the dishwasher. Guess you didn't hear of the case last year when a child died inside a dishwasher. A switch as such could have saved that child life, possibly.

    I am curious if you couldn't figure out how to run the dishwasher how did you describe to your client what that switch was to go to?

    I've often wondered this.... how many of you note switches with no apparent function?

    I have to admit I don't... Too often they are just in place for future or past equipment and noting and descibing them all would take forever. This is one you get as a bonus if you attend the inspection. I'll ask and agent or buyer to switch in on and off and I'll see if I can figure it out.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Central Washington
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    Thanks for the link Rick.

    Some how I missed this story.

    Just goes to show how important this site is.

    Chip


  10. #10
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Child proof switches

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    I've often wondered this.... how many of you note switches with no apparent function?

    I have to admit I don't... Too often they are just in place for future or past equipment and noting and describing them all would take forever. This is one you get as a bonus if you attend the inspection. I'll ask and agent or buyer to switch in on and off and I'll see if I can figure it out.
    Matt: My habit is to turn on every wall switch in the house when I first enter. When I go back through the house toward the end of the inspection I turn them all off and observe their function. If a switch does not appear to be connected to anything, I note that in my report. If a switch has been taped in the "on" or "off" position I note that too. In both instances I make a statement to the effect that, "the purpose of this wall switch is not obvious and you are strongly urged to consult with the current owner and/or a master electrician regarding the purpose of this switch prior to closing escrow on this home."

    The practice of installing redundant disconnects in the form of a wall switches for dishwashers has been around this area since the lat 1960s. I personally think it is ridiculous. It is also somewhat inconvenient in that, if you inadvertently turn the switch to the "off" position during a wash cycle, on some machines it will cause the cycle to end - waste of soap and water.

    Child protection? Talk sense to them, slap a hand now and then, - or, buy them their own little Kevlar condom in which to reside. Life is not childproof, and it shouldn't be. We learn from making mistakes. Take away the mistakes and we stop learning.

    Aaron


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