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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Frankfort, KY
    Posts
    326

    Default Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    House Bill H.R.1796 Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act
    This bill is one that could have a severe impact on the services we are allowed to provide our customers in regards to CO safety.


    If this bill is passed it will prohibit those of us who provide higher levels of CO safety to our clients to do so by means of providing low level CO monitors that exceed the current UL 2034 standards.


    If this doesn’t scare you it should as we will be forced to provide a substandard product to our clients that does not provide true protection for all ages and medical conditions.


    According to the bill all CO alarms must meet the UL 2034 standard or they will be deemed illegal devices.


    For those unfamiliar with the UL 2034 standard it provides no true protection levels for the elderly, infants, or those with medical conditions.


    There are currently two low level CO monitors that provide true protection from CO at low levels that being the NSI 3000 and CO Experts monitors.
    If you provide these monitors to your clients as a means of protection they will become illegal if this bill is passed!

    Two links to look at for reference to this bill are:

    ApplianceMagazine.com*|*NEMA's Carbon Monoxide Bill Approved by House

    Bill Summary & Status - 111th Congress (2009 - 2010) - H.R.1796 - CRS Summary - THOMAS (Library of Congress)

    The gentleman who needs to hear from those of us who are concerned about this bill is dswitzer at cpsc dot gov just be sure to substitute the symbols @ and . for at and dot in the e-mail address.
    Anything you can do to help prevent this from happening is critical and needs to happen quickly and by a lot of us.

    Please post any questions and comments in regards to this and take action if you truly want to make a positive impact in regards to CO poisoning.
    Sorry for the long post guys but this is really important.


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  2. #2
    Philippe Heller's Avatar
    Philippe Heller Guest

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    California already passes a law requiring CO detectors starting in January 2011 in any house that changes title, or rental. Over the next couple of years ALL houses are supposed to have a CO detector. Interstingly, they don't specify the quality or sensitivity of the CO detector. Just put one in. So we have started to report on the presence or absence of CO detectors.

    For a detailed description of SB 183, you can see it HERE.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,828

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    As with smoke detectors, Until there is a device I can test the sensitivity of the unit with, I do not test smoke, or carbon monoxide detectors. I recommend that all clients buy new equipment for their safety in their new home.
    Sure it makes noise, But does it really work.
    Who knows?
    I am not willing to accept liability for a 15 dollar item made in china to protect my clients.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Frankfort, KY
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    Quote Originally Posted by wayne soper View Post
    As with smoke detectors, Until there is a device I can test the sensitivity of the unit with, I do not test smoke, or carbon monoxide detectors. I recommend that all clients buy new equipment for their safety in their new home.
    Sure it makes noise, But does it really work.
    Who knows?
    I am not willing to accept liability for a 15 dollar item made in china to protect my clients.

    That's one thing about the two low level CO monitors that are available today, they can be tested.
    Over the counter models cannot be tested!

    Measured Performance more than just a buzzword

  5. #5
    Philippe Heller's Avatar
    Philippe Heller Guest

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    Wayne,

    That is an excellent point. Even though SOP's state that we don't check the "adequacy" of any products, there must be liability if a detector fails because it is crap.

    We too recommend replacing all detectors, particularly those over 10 years old or when moving into a house. But I can see adding language in the report that is stronger for two reasons.

    1. Old detectors suck.
    2. If a client buys detectors, then the liability is on them to choose quality over price.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    Thanks for the update David!! I will encourage everyone to join the letter writing campaign.

    As with radon I offer CO testing as a separate service for clients. If they chose no to have it done, a standard blurb is inserted in my report about the recent law change requiring all homes sold to have a CO detector and urging them for their and their families safety, to get them installed.

    Beacon Inspection Services
    Proudly Serving the Greater Henderson and Las Vegas Valley Area in Southern Nevada!
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  7. #7
    Dan Huckins's Avatar
    Dan Huckins Guest

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    Thanks for the update. I think it is important to always take the time to inform our clients about smoke and c/o detectors, how they work, the difference between types, when to get new ones and some examples of c/o and smoke sources so they will have a better understanding of the issues and be more prone to take our advice. I also recommend replacing all units with new ones unless the age of the existing ones can be verified. I suppose it will become necessary to include a statement in our reports that people who may be more sensitive to lower levels should shop for units that will meet their needs. It would be unfortunate if we could not point them in the right direction because those units were not available.


  8. #8
    Tom Camp's Avatar
    Tom Camp Guest

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    Colorado has had a Carbon Monoxide Alarm law in place since July 2009. The following is a part Colorado "HB-1091".

    ************************************************** **************************

    AN ACT
    Effective July 1, 2009

    CONCERNING A REQUIREMENT THAT CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS BE INSTALLED IN
    RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES.


    Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado:

    SECTION 1. Short title. This act shall be known and may be cited as the
    "Lofgren and Johnson Families Carbon Monoxide Safety Act".

    SECTION 2. Title 38, Colorado Revised Statutes, is amended BY THE
    ADDITION OF A NEW ARTICLE to read:

    ARTICLE 45
    Safety of Real Property

    38-45-101. Definitions. AS USED IN THIS ARTICLE, UNLESS THE CONTEXT
    OTHERWISE REQUIRES:

    (1) "CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM" MEANS A DEVICE THAT DETECTS CARBON
    MONOXIDE AND THAT:

    (a) PRODUCES A DISTINCT, AUDIBLE ALARM;

    (b) IS LISTED BY A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED, INDEPENDENT PRODUCT-SAFETY
    TESTING AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY TO CONFORM TO THE STANDARDS FOR
    CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS ISSUED BY SUCH LABORATORY OR ANY SUCCESSOR
    STANDARDS;

    (c) IS BATTERY POWERED, PLUGS INTO A DWELLING'S ELECTRICAL OUTLET AND HAS
    A BATTERY BACKUP, IS WIRED INTO A DWELLING'S ELECTRICAL SYSTEM AND HAS A
    BATTERY BACK-UP, OR IS CONNECTED TO AN ELECTRICAL SYSTEM VIA AN ELECTRICAL
    PANEL; AND

    (d) MAY BE COMBINED WITH A SMOKE DETECTING DEVICE IF THE COMBINED DEVICE
    COMPLIES WITH APPLICABLE LAW REGARDING BOTH SMOKE DETECTING DEVICES AND
    CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS AND THAT THE COMBINED UNIT PRODUCES AN ALARM, OR
    AN ALARM AND VOICE SIGNAL, IN A MANNER THAT CLEARLY DIFFERENTIATES
    BETWEEN THE TWO HAZARDS.

    (2) "DWELLING UNIT" MEANS A SINGLE UNIT PROVIDING COMPLETE INDEPENDENT
    LIVING FACILITIES FOR ONE OR MORE PERSONS, INCLUDING PERMANENT PROVISIONS
    FOR LIVING, SLEEPING, EATING, COOKING, AND SANITATION.

    PAGE 2-HOUSE BILL 09-1091
    (3) "FUEL" MEANS COAL, KEROSENE, OIL, FUEL GASES, OR OTHER
    PETROLEUM PRODUCTS OR HYDROCARBON PRODUCTS SUCH AS WOOD THAT
    EMIT CARBON MONOXIDE AS A BY-PRODUCT OF COMBUSTION.
    (4) "INSTALLED" MEANS THAT A CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM IS
    INSTALLED IN A DWELLING UNIT IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING WAYS:
    (a) WIRED DIRECTLY INTO THE DWELLING'S ELECTRICAL SYSTEM;
    (b) DIRECTLY PLUGGED INTO AN ELECTRICAL OUTLET WITHOUT A
    SWITCH OTHER THAN A CIRCUIT BREAKER; OR
    (c) IF THE ALARM IS BATTERY-POWERED, ATTACHED TO THE WALL OR
    CEILING OF THE DWELLING UNIT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE NATIONAL FIRE
    PROTECTION ASSOCIATION'S STANDARD 720, OR ANY SUCCESSOR STANDARD,
    FOR THE OPERATION AND INSTALLATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTION
    AND WARNING EQUIPMENT IN DWELLING UNITS.
    (5) "MULTI-FAMILY DWELLING" MEANS ANY IMPROVED REAL
    PROPERTY USED OR INTENDED TO BE USED AS A RESIDENCE AND THAT
    CONTAINS MORE THAN ONE DWELLING UNIT. MULTI-FAMILY DWELLING
    INCLUDES A CONDOMINIUM OR COOPERATIVE.
    (6) "OPERATIONAL" MEANS WORKING AND IN SERVICE IN
    ACCORDANCE WITH MANUFACTURER INSTRUCTIONS.
    (7) "SINGLE-FAMILY DWELLING" MEANS ANY IMPROVED REAL
    PROPERTY USED OR INTENDED TO BE USED AS A RESIDENCE AND THAT
    CONTAINS ONE DWELLING UNIT.

    Colorado Springs - Home Inspections, Commercial Inspections, Radon Inspections, Mold Inspections


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,481

    Default Re: Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act House Bill H.R. 1796

    Quote Originally Posted by Philippe Heller View Post
    California already passes a law requiring CO detectors starting in January 2011 in any house that changes title, or rental. Over the next couple of years ALL houses are supposed to have a CO detector. Interstingly, they don't specify the quality or sensitivity of the CO detector. Just put one in. So we have started to report on the presence or absence of CO detectors.

    For a detailed description of SB 183, you can see it HERE.
    Does anyone from California know the Health & Safety Code number of this requirement? I have been looking and have been unable to locate the actual law.

    Thanks.

    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

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