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  1. #1
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    Default Shims in the garage door track

    I did an inspection yesterday where the owners used the house as a second home (they are only there in the winter). They had a security system that was not turned on (they didn't want to pay for monitoring). They had shims in the tracks of the garage door (as security) and the garage door opener unplugged. When I plugged in the opener and tried to open the doors the shims became evident. The garage doors failed to work. Because of the brand (I-drives) I spent some time trying to reset the breakers and get the units back on line. Bottom line they need $250 worth of repair to work again.
    Whose fault is it mine or the home owners?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    I did an inspection yesterday where the owners used the house as a second home (they are only there in the winter). They had a security system that was not turned on (they didn't want to pay for monitoring). They had shims in the tracks of the garage door (as security) and the garage door opener unplugged. When I plugged in the opener and tried to open the doors the shims became evident. The garage doors failed to work. Because of the brand (I-drives) I spent some time trying to reset the breakers and get the units back on line. Bottom line they need $250 worth of repair to work again.
    Whose fault is it mine or the home owners?
    Another way to look at this is how much is it worth to you to make this go away and keep any goodwill that you might have?

    I would say that the blame is on both the owner and you. The owner for not letting you know that the shims were in the track and with you for not looking for problems with the door before operating it. You have learned a fairly inexpensive lesson when it comes to garage doors. Always check the door for locks, broken rollers and obstructions before you operate the opener!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
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  3. #3
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    I did an inspection yesterday where the owners used the house as a second home (they are only there in the winter). They had a security system that was not turned on (they didn't want to pay for monitoring). They had shims in the tracks of the garage door (as security) and the garage door opener unplugged. When I plugged in the opener and tried to open the doors the shims became evident. The garage doors failed to work. Because of the brand (I-drives) I spent some time trying to reset the breakers and get the units back on line. Bottom line they need $250 worth of repair to work again.
    Whose fault is it mine or the home owners?
    I would not have plugged in the opener without a email from either the seller or the seller agent saying it was okay to do so. Same for cutting on valves and breakers. You never know why something is cut off or unplugged as you found out the hard way. If you were in NC you went outside the SOP by plugging in the opener.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    . Always check the door for locks, broken rollers and obstructions before you operate the opener!

    Worth repeating, that's for sure.

    If you operated a non-damaged door that was "disconnected" (so to speak) you have most, if not all, responsibility.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    I know I am guilty of not practicing what I preach, but it is a good idea to MANUALLY operate the door first before hitting that little button. This way things like this don't sneak up on us and we can test the balance and operation of the door before worrying about the operator.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    I run into this situation all the time with foreclosed properties. Opener unplugged and a lock or bolt through the track. If you're going to plug in a door opener to test it, ALWAYS make sure the track it clear before you attempt to open it. You are responsible for the damage if you don't.

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    Cool Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Thanks for the info. Any other inexpensive tips you have learned in the past I could look out for? You know mistakes you have had to pay for?


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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    Thanks for the info. Any other inexpensive tips you have learned in the past I could look out for? You know mistakes you have had to pay for?
    Dishwasher with a bunch of plastic containers stored in it. Plastic does not do well with the heating element!

    Garage door & a motorcycle. I will not tell what happened, but it did involve a custom motorcycle. This was the only time I have used my GL insurance in 15 years.

    Set of French doors. Let's just say that you should move any bed that is blocking access to a door.

    All in all I feel quite lucky with over 5,000 inspections under my belt and this is all that I have screwed up! A word to the wise...... All of my screw-ups were in the first 4 years of being in business! Let's just say that it is a learning experience to have a screw-up!

    Scott Patterson, ACI
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Check the inside of the oven before turning it on. Many sellers use it as storage for flamable materials. Often find plastic and wicker.

    Pull back the shower curtain before turing on the water. Sellers store all kinds of things in shower/tubs.

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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    Thanks for the info. Any other inexpensive tips you have learned in the past I could look out for? You know mistakes you have had to pay for?
    Yes, never test the auto reversing motor on the garage door without first making sure there is a reinforcing bracket across the top.

    And keep an eye on newly installed electric baseboard heaters. I had one burst into flames a few years ago.

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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    Thanks for the info. Any other inexpensive tips you have learned in the past I could look out for? You know mistakes you have had to pay for?
    Watch out for the really flimsy metal garage doors with the really thin plate glass windows in them.

    And check the track. This door was hanging on two bent nails.

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    If I can I will always get the owner/seller or even the buyer or an agent to plug something in or turn something on. I say well I you what this tested or inspected. I like to get that lady of the house to show me how her kitchen works... Not trying to get out of work this is a good practice...

    Best

    Ron


    P.S. Scott a motorcycle OUCH!


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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Motorcycle, ha, how about a garage door falling on a Bentley convertible? No, not coming down and reversing, the door falling off the tracks and crushing the windshield flat with the rest of the car. Dont ask for a picture, its been deleted for mental health issues.

    Paul Kondzich
    Ft. Myers, FL.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Bibler View Post
    If I can I will always get the owner/seller or even the buyer or an agent to plug something in or turn something on. I say well I you what this tested or inspected. I like to get that lady of the house to show me how her kitchen works... Not trying to get out of work this is a good practice...

    Best

    Ron


    P.S. Scott a motorcycle OUCH!
    Yea, it was a custom 1999 Honda Goldwing with a matching sidecar. The sidecar was for the owners dog. It was a mess and not a fun day!

    Now if it had been a Bentley? That might have been worth a bottle of single malt to calm the nerves.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Get out your checkbook and write one out. Lesson learned.


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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Tadd View Post
    Thanks for the info. Any other inexpensive tips you have learned in the past I could look out for? You know mistakes you have had to pay for?
    When you test the garage door for reversal due to reasonable resistance, use a point near the center of the door span and only when it is nearly closed. If you hold pressure against the closing door off to the side rather than the center it can rack out of the tracks. If the downward sensor is set too high (which it is 90% of the time) the whole thing wads up. Doing the test near the fully closed position also helps prevent the racking of the door.

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Vern Heiler View Post
    When you test the garage door for reversal due to reasonable resistance, use a point near the center of the door span and only when it is nearly closed. If you hold pressure against the closing door off to the side rather than the center it can rack out of the tracks. If the downward sensor is set too high (which it is 90% of the time) the whole thing wads up. Doing the test near the fully closed position also helps prevent the racking of the door.
    I am trying to figure out one properly tests the reversing feature of a garage door operator by placing a 2x4 on the floor under the center of the door and the test is somehow performed at height which is not where the door is nearly closed and is off center of the door ...


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  18. #18
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    I wrote a door up (one of two in the garage) that hung up once every few tries but would nt and did not do it when I pushed it up manually first or afterward.

    I was alone at the home and I kept running the door up and down and trying to get to the side I felt was binding and never got there in time.

    Finnly I said the hell with it and wrote it up stating that it hung up on occassion just on the right side of the door but not all the time and only once long enough for the door to actually reverse.

    The garage door guy they sent out calls me up bitching away about how we home inspectors don't know are a s s from our elbows stating that he was just out there a couple of weeks ago because another inspector wrote up the same thing (hello) He could not get the door to do it and checked the track and rollers and such. He finally calls me back still bitching and I talked him into doing it about three times in a row because it did not always do it.

    On the third try..............the door came down on top of him..................yes, on top of him, while on the phone with me.


    Realtors always wonder why I write the things I do. If I did not right it up someone would be having me repair the Bentley or custom trike or paying their kids hospital bill......or burying their wife. I can guaranty you an over head door man would have found something wrong with that door to put on me somehow.


  19. #19
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    I am trying to figure out one properly tests the reversing feature of a garage door operator by placing a 2x4 on the floor under the center of the door and the test is somehow performed at height which is not where the door is nearly closed and is off center of the door ...
    Jerry I never said anything about using a 2X4, however I have heard of and read about that test. The 2X4 test is not reasonable resistance by most, and I'm sure even your standards. The term "reasonable resistance" is used in the NC SOP, and in most of the manufacturers installation instructions.

    The reason to place resistance on the door using your hand, as I described, is that it gives you the ability to release the door when it does not reverse. If the door jambs, do to racking in the tracks while making the turn, you can't stop the inevitable crash.

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    I am trying to figure out one properly tests the reversing feature of a garage door operator by placing a 2x4 on the floor under the center of the door and the test is somehow performed at height which is not where the door is nearly closed and is off center of the door ...

    In NC, we are required to check the force reverse feature to see if it will stop and reverse with a reasonable force. This is what Vern was referring to, not the 2x4 entrapment test, it is not required by NC.

    You won't catch me putting a 2x4 under any door even if the force reversal check was reasonable.

    Last edited by Bruce King; 10-03-2010 at 09:31 PM.
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    I wrote a door up (one of two in the garage) that hung up once every few tries but would nt and did not do it when I pushed it up manually first or afterward.

    I was alone at the home and I kept running the door up and down and trying to get to the side I felt was binding and never got there in time.

    Finnly I said the hell with it and wrote it up stating that it hung up on occassion just on the right side of the door but not all the time and only once long enough for the door to actually reverse.

    On the third try..............the door came down on top of him..................yes, on top of him, while on the phone with me.

    That's the real problem. If the adjustment is set too high, the door does not reverse, it just keeps on pushing until somthing gives.

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce King View Post
    In NC, we are required to check the force reverse feature to see if it will stop and reverse with a reasonable force. This is what Vern was referring to, not the 2x4 entrapment test, it is not required by NC.

    You won't catch me putting a 2x4 under any door even if the force reversal check was reasonable.
    Me either....no need to damage a door to prove a point.


  23. #23
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Wasn't there a test with a roll of paper towels in the past ?

    If the roll was crushed then so would a kid's head be.


  24. #24
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Lowery View Post
    Wasn't there a test with a roll of paper towels in the past ?

    If the roll was crushed then so would a kid's head be.
    Was it the Pillsbury Dogh boy?

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Lowery View Post
    Wasn't there a test with a roll of paper towels in the past ?

    If the roll was crushed then so would a kid's head be.
    I just bring a baby in from one of the surrounding homes to test if the door is adjusted properly. If I cannot find a baby I look around for a neighbors small, annoying barking dog.


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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Ramsey View Post
    Check the inside of the oven before turning it on. Many sellers use it as storage for flamable materials. Often find plastic and wicker.

    Pull back the shower curtain before turing on the water. Sellers store all kinds of things in shower/tubs.
    Good thing you didn't find the homeowner in there! I know a mechanical inspector that found the homeowner and his wife doing a little skinny dippin' in their hot tub! They ran into each other in the hallway. I'll bet that was a little ackward...

    Randy Gordon, construction
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  27. #27
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Thomas, when equipment such as a garage door opener is disconnected (unplugged) I usually assume that there is a reason for it, especially when a home is seasonal. Obviously the home owner should have place a tag on the cord, indicating why it was unplugged. How many actually do this, I am guessing none. The report should indicate that the garage door was not tested, for the above reason.


  28. #28
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    If the door is unplugged I always try to operate it manually. HUD homes will sometimes have a lock stuck in the rollers.
    I always look at the track and rollers before I try to operate the door. I know 3 realtors that ripped the door connectors off by just hitting the buttons as they came into the garage. Just sad, yeah.

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  29. #29
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    A lot of useful info in this thread. In class, we were told not to risk back injury holding the door, but I can now see why using a board (as we were instructed) would be a bad idea.

    Think I'll go with the baby or noisy small dog idea.


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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by QAsRevenge View Post
    but I can now see why using a board (as we were instructed) would be a bad idea.
    It is unfortunate that some decline to use their real names here, and using a name as you chose removes any credibility you may have.

    That said ... using the board is the only approved test that I recall.

    Unless the test you intend to use incorporates another approved test method, your test would fail when challenged.

    Using the doll, neighbors yappy dog, etc., adds "zip" to the test, but it does not indicate anything with regard to whether the door actually passes the approved test ... this is because you did not do an approved test.

    If you follow the approved test method with the board and do it as the test method calls for, there is no risk to a properly installed door - no risk other than what is normally associated with pushing the button which operates the door and watching the door go up and down.

    If one cannot do a test properly, then one SHOULD NOT be doing the test.

    MAKING THINGS UP as you go instead of doing a proper test leaves you with no defense when something happens.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  31. #31
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    It is unfortunate that some decline to use their real names here, and using a name as you chose removes any credibility you may have.
    Tried to use my real name but it was taken. An unfortunately common occurrence for me being born with the name Ted Williams.


  32. #32
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by QAsRevenge View Post
    Tried to use my real name but it was taken. An unfortunately common occurrence for me being born with the name Ted Williams.
    In which case you could go Ted E Williams, or T. Williams, or .... there are lots of other choices other than "QAsRevenge".

    Just pointing out that there are options which would not take away from the credibility of what appears to be "anonymous" posts.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    In which case you could go Ted E Williams, or T. Williams, or .... there are lots of other choices other than "QAsRevenge".

    Just pointing out that there are options which would not take away from the credibility of what appears to be "anonymous" posts.
    Jerry has a very good point.

    Many prospective clients shop this board and others when they are looking for an inspector. This year alone I have had around a half dozen or so jobs just from my participation on this board and TIJ. Use your real name or a variation of it. Ted Williams 2, etc... If you can't change it send Brian an email and he can do it.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
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  34. #34
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    It is unfortunate that some decline to use their real names here, and using a name as you chose removes any credibility you may have.

    That said ... using the board is the only approved test that I recall.

    Unless the test you intend to use incorporates another approved test method, your test would fail when challenged.

    Using the doll, neighbors yappy dog, etc., adds "zip" to the test, but it does not indicate anything with regard to whether the door actually passes the approved test ... this is because you did not do an approved test.

    If you follow the approved test method with the board and do it as the test method calls for, there is no risk to a properly installed door - no risk other than what is normally associated with pushing the button which operates the door and watching the door go up and down.

    If one cannot do a test properly, then one SHOULD NOT be doing the test.

    MAKING THINGS UP as you go instead of doing a proper test leaves you with no defense when something happens.
    Look at pg. 27, bottom left quadrant.

    http://www.chamberlain-diy.com/doity...s/114A3060.pdf

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Now look at Page 28, lower left quadrant.

    This is what I do.

    http://www.chamberlain-diy.com/doity...s/114A3060.pdf

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Vern Heiler View Post
    Look at pg. 27, bottom left quadrant.

    http://www.chamberlain-diy.com/doity...s/114A3060.pdf
    Quote Originally Posted by Vern Heiler View Post
    Now look at Page 28, lower left quadrant.

    This is what I do.

    http://www.chamberlain-diy.com/doity...s/114A3060.pdf
    Did you read what those "tests" are for? Is that what you are doing?

    No? Then why are you doing THAT "test"?

    Now, continue reading to page 29, to where it says "Test the Safety Reversal System", and "WARNING", followed by "Door MUST reverse on contact with 1-1/2" high (3.8 cm) object (or 2x4 laid flat) on the floor."

    That says NOTHING about "testing" the reversal system any other way.

    Again, thank you for the link stating the same thing I said.

    When did you enter the garage door adjusting field?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  37. #37
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Did you read what those "tests" are for? Is that what you are doing?

    No? Then why are you doing THAT "test"?

    Now, continue reading to page 29, to where it says "Test the Safety Reversal System", and "WARNING", followed by "Door MUST reverse on contact with 1-1/2" high (3.8 cm) object (or 2x4 laid flat) on the floor."

    That says NOTHING about "testing" the reversal system any other way.

    Again, thank you for the link stating the same thing I said.

    When did you enter the garage door adjusting field?
    The travel limit test "2X4", is only to be preformed after all other adjustments have been made. As demonstrated by the loud bang, heard by a poster on this thread, it is a fools test to say the least! It not only will cause damage, but will not protect even the smallest child from serious injury.

    The force adjustment and test is not only logical but is what is required by the NC SOP. Not the Travel Limit.

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  38. #38
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by QAsRevenge View Post
    A lot of useful info in this thread. In class, we were told not to risk back injury holding the door, but I can now see why using a board (as we were instructed) would be a bad idea.
    Anyone that hurts his back testing a garage door has never lifted a sheet of drywall, and won't last long as a HI. No, the Gorilla Grabber won't work upside down.
    Use the puppy like everybody else does.

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  39. #39
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Anyone that hurts his back testing a garage door has never lifted a sheet of drywall, and won't last long as a HI.
    Not worried about getting hurt myself (leg pressed 650lbs 12 times on last set this morning ), just passing on AHIT's instructor's information. They recommended the 2x4 test.

    I guess a pet turtle could be used to add dramatic flair though. "Introducing! Sammy The Safety Turtle!"


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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by QAsRevenge View Post
    Not worried about getting hurt myself (leg pressed 650lbs 12 times on last set this morning )
    You'll have no problem opening the attic hatch, then.

    The beef I have with the 2 X 4 test is that once in a while, you will damage the garage door. Sure, it was not set up correctly, and may have been a hazard, but now it is broken and the home owner is choked. He will want a new door. Your client the buyer will want a new door. The realtors are pointing at you, the tester with the 2X4.

    The turtle is a good one. You can say it must have just crawled in off the street.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    In which case you could go Ted E Williams, or T. Williams, or .... there are lots of other choices other than "QAsRevenge".

    Just pointing out that there are options which would not take away from the credibility of what appears to be "anonymous" posts.

    Maybe Joe Dimaggio is not taken

    Galen L. Beasley
    Inspections Supervisor
    Housing Authority of Kansas City MO

  42. #42
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    You'll have no problem opening the attic hatch, then.
    Believe me, it's a constant worry. "Hmm...How hard can I push/pull/twist this thing before it breaks off in my hand ?" (Insert penis joke here)

    Thinking about the turtle thing though. Might be able to save some money on the guilt factor. "OMG! Your dangerous, faulty door killed Sammy!"


  43. #43
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    I can't figure out why HI's would purge the "release instinct" from there minds? It was firmly embedded in mine at a very young age. RELEASE before Mom rips my arm off!

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  44. #44
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Vern Heiler View Post
    The travel limit test "2X4", is only to be preformed after all other adjustments have been made. As demonstrated by the loud bang, heard by a poster on this thread, it is a fools test to say the least! It not only will cause damage, but will not protect even the smallest child from serious injury.

    The force adjustment and test is not only logical but is what is required by the NC SOP. Not the Travel Limit.
    The 2x4 IS NOT the "travel limit test", the 2x4 test IS THE test to check for reversing ON CONTACT with the 2x4.

    The HOME INSPECTOR tests for the auto reversing, WHICH IS the 2x4 test.

    The INSTALLER is SUPPOSED to be the person doing the ADJUSTMENTS, not the home inspector. The ADJUSTMENT procedure you said you use is for ADJUSTMENTS, not for testing the auto reverse - go back and read that manual you posted. Again, I thank you for posting that manual which supports what I have been saying - thank you.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  45. #45
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    The beef I have with the 2 X 4 test is that once in a while, you will damage the garage door. Sure, it was not set up correctly, and may have been a hazard, but now it is broken and the home owner is choked. He will want a new door. Your client the buyer will want a new door. The realtors are pointing at you, the tester with the 2X4.

    And that is when you stand your ground and point out the CORRECT way to test the auto reverse is with the 2x4, and would they rather have their child laying dead under a defective door or a damaged door.

    I tested the auto reverse for 20 years with the 2x4 and never damaged a single door, I placed the 2x4 where it was supposed to be placed. I have had the tracks bow up like a strung bow about to shoot an arrow out, but no damage to the door.

    I have had several doors falls, and I was not testing the auto reverse. I had one track, at a joint between two sections of track, snap a bolt and partially fall - again, not testing the auto reverse.

    You guys apparently do not know how to use "failed under test".

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  46. #46
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    You guys apparently do not know how to use "failed under test".
    Over use of this term will be the rock a HI will perish on!

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  47. #47
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    The 2x4 IS NOT the "travel limit test", the 2x4 test IS THE test to check for reversing ON CONTACT with the 2x4.

    The HOME INSPECTOR tests for the auto reversing, WHICH IS the 2x4 test.

    The INSTALLER is SUPPOSED to be the person doing the ADJUSTMENTS, not the home inspector. The ADJUSTMENT procedure you said you use is for ADJUSTMENTS, not for testing the auto reverse - go back and read that manual you posted. Again, I thank you for posting that manual which supports what I have been saying - thank you.
    Partal quote: "1. Test the DOWN (close) force
    Grasp the door bottom when the door is about halfway through DOWN (close) travel. ......."

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  48. #48
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    ADJUSTMENT STEP 3
    Test the Safety Reversal System

    TEST
    Place 2x4 bla bla

    If the door stops on the obstruction it is not traveling far enough. bla bla

    adjust the DOWN LIMIT cw one turn.... bla bla.

    sometimes I hate PDF files!

    The beatings will continue until morale has improved. mgt.

  49. #49
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    And that is when you stand your ground and point out the CORRECT way to test the auto reverse is with the 2x4, and would they rather have their child laying dead under a defective door or a damaged door.

    I tested the auto reverse for 20 years with the 2x4 and never damaged a single door, I placed the 2x4 where it was supposed to be placed. I have had the tracks bow up like a strung bow about to shoot an arrow out, but no damage to the door.

    You guys apparently do not know how to use "failed under test".
    Those are some robust doors you are describing. Yes, the old timer wooden units are pretty strong. Not so the cheap metal ones. I have broken glass windows stopping the door by hand. I have seen them start to fold up when I failed to let go in time. Now it's got a pretty crease in it, and it doesn't close tight anymore. Oh well, I've "tested" it.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  50. #50
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    As proven with past post on garage door testing, this one goes on and on and on!

    I do not test the pressure reverser feature of garage doors and I say so in my reports. I only check the reverse feature with the electric eyes. I check the balance by disconnecting the door from the drive. I look at all of the rollers, hinges and bracing. That is pretty much the sum total of my garage door inspection.

    Up until a year ago I use to place a dayglow orange sticker on the door that said "Trace Inspections did not test this door. Homeowners are advised to test their garage doors for proper operation. Follow the attached labels on the door, the door/opener manual or contact the manufacturer for the proper methods of testing the door." The reason I stopped using the sticker was that I ran out of them and have not reordered them......

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  51. #51
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    Default Re: Shims in the garage door track

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Those are some robust doors you are describing. Yes, the old timer wooden units are pretty strong. Not so the cheap metal ones. I have broken glass windows stopping the door by hand. I have seen them start to fold up when I failed to let go in time. Now it's got a pretty crease in it, and it doesn't close tight anymore. Oh well, I've "tested" it.
    I tested many cheaper metal garage doors too ... and had the track bow upward with them too, and no damage to the doors either. Maybe I just had a knack for it?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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