Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    OH
    Posts
    1

    Default Venting an electric cook top

    If you have a building with multiple units in Ohio will they allow you to vent all the cook tops through one main pipe or are they going to require each individual unit to have it's own vent to the outside?

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,035

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Depends on much information not provided.

    Your best answer (and the only "real" answer) would come from calling the local building department, describing the type of building and number of stories to them, and ask them.

    If they use the term "shaft", as in "are you exhausting each one to a common exhaust duct riser in a shaft", that will provide part of your answer, and that exhaust duct riser would likely require a 2-hour rated shaft around it (depending on many things, including the number of stories).

    The first part of the question is Mechanical Code related (for exhausting the range hoods), the second part of the question is Building Code related (for protection of the exhaust duct as needed).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle James View Post
    If you have a building with multiple units in Ohio will they allow you to vent all the cook tops through one main pipe or are they going to require each individual unit to have it's own vent to the outside?
    M1503.1 General.Range hoods shall discharge to the outdoors through a single-wall duct. The duct serving thehood shall have a smooth interior surface, shall be air tight, shall be equipped with a back-draftdamper, and shall be independent of all other exhaust systems. Ducts serving range hoods shallnot terminate in an attic or crawl space or areas inside the building.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,035

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    ... and shall be independent of all other exhaust systems. ...
    Which is not stating that each range hood shall discharge directly to the outdoors by itself.

    That means that the exhaust from range hoods, because it is grease laden air, shall not be mixed with the exhausts form other sources.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Which is not stating that each range hood shall discharge directly to the outdoors by itself.

    That means that the exhaust from range hoods, because it is grease laden air, shall not be mixed with the exhausts form other sources.
    Its pretty much self explanatory.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,035

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    M1503.1 General.Range hoods shall discharge to the outdoors through a single-wall duct. The duct serving thehood shall have a smooth interior surface, shall be air tight, shall be equipped with a back-draftdamper, and shall be independent of all other exhaust systems. Ducts serving range hoods shallnot terminate in an attic or crawl space or areas inside the building.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Which is not stating that each range hood shall discharge directly to the outdoors by itself.

    That means that the exhaust from range hoods, because it is grease laden air, shall not be mixed with the exhausts form other sources.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    Its pretty much self explanatory.
    It is very much self explanatory, but it looks like you missed what it was explaining when you bolded parts of the code as though it was an answer to the original posters question - it is not.

    I will change the bold parts of it:
    M1503.1 General. Range hoods shall discharge to the outdoors through a single-wall duct. The duct serving the hood shall have a smooth interior surface, shall be air tight, shall be equipped with a back-draft damper, and shall be independent of all other exhaust systems. Ducts serving range hoods shall not terminate in an attic or crawl space or areas inside the building.

    But ... first ... let's start with this: (bold and underlining are mine
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle James View Post
    If you have a building with multiple units in Ohio will they allow you to vent all the cook tops through one main pipe or are they going to require each individual unit to have it's own vent to the outside?
    Then go to the code you referenced: (bold and underlining are mine)
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    M1503.1 General. ...
    So, your first question really is this:
    Which code applies to the building in the question? Residential or Mechanical

    And your second question is this:
    Which code did you reference? Residential or Mechanical

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 07-27-2019 at 07:04 AM. Reason: added a "[" to a "QUOTE]" that I had missed - should have been "[QUOTE]"
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    M1503.1 General.Range hoods shall discharge to the outdoors through a single-wall duct. The duct serving thehood shall have a smooth interior surface, shall be air tight, shall be equipped with a back-draftdamper, and shall be independent of all other exhaust systems. Ducts serving range hoods shallnot terminate in an attic or crawl space or areas inside the building.

    .....you're in the wrong code volume for multi-family.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Sheppard View Post
    .....you're in the wrong code volume for multi-family.
    Is there a different code saying a bunch of kitchen vents can be tied in and vented through a one single stack?

    If there is a fire or something in unit one, the smoke spread, etc will effect the the floors?

    I don't know, maybe I'm wrong but I haven't seen that done yet in multi-story units, unless there is a certain way of doing this to prevent build up and fires, etc.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    Is there a different code saying a bunch of kitchen vents can be tied in and vented through a one single stack?

    If there is a fire or something in unit one, the smoke spread, etc will effect the the floors?

    I don't know, maybe I'm wrong but I haven't seen that done yet in multi-story units, unless there is a certain way of doing this to prevent build up and fires, etc.

    ......Building volume.


    EDIT: Ok, here's the rub.....look at the citation you provided and re-read it the way Jerry bolded it. "Other exhaust systems".....you're think a system of the same class would be an "other" exhaust system...which it is not.

    The citation you provided is for 1 Family, 2 Family detached homes and townhomes...anything other than that would be considered "multi-family" and kick you over to the "Building" volume of the code.

    This is where most inspectors get hung-up, confusing the "Residential" building code with "Group-R" occupancies. The terms may be worded the same but the occupancy classification is different, this requires the structures to be built under different code volumes. The "Residential" volume allows a greater range of materials to be used for construction because it has specific requirements for egress....i.e., everyone can get out of the building fast.

    The Building volume has stricter requirements for egress sizing, location, travel distance, fire-resistance/protection, height and area limitations and active fire suppression system requirements (and more). To add, you can even "share" egresses to the exit discharge under the Building volume.

    Building limitations, such as lot or area size, may contribute to which volume the designer will choose. But the occupancy classification will ultimately make that determination....

    Last edited by Robert Sheppard; 07-27-2019 at 08:29 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,035

    Default Re: Venting an electric cook top

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Levitt View Post
    Is there a different code saying a bunch of kitchen vents can be tied in and vented through a one single stack?

    If there is a fire or something in unit one, the smoke spread, etc will effect the the floors?

    I don't know, maybe I'm wrong but I haven't seen that done yet in multi-story units, unless there is a certain way of doing this to prevent build up and fires, etc.
    It is done all the time in high-rise buildings where all the bathroom vents connect to a single vertical exhaust, and that vent is enclosed in a 2 hour rated shaft enclosure; same for kitchen hood exhausts - each unit connects to a vertical exhaust which is enclosed in a 2 hour rated shaft enclosure; same for fresh air vents, etc.

    Even on typical 2 and 3 story buildings, the exhausts are sometimes connected to a single vertical exhaust enclosed in a shaft.

    ~~~~~~~~
    Added with edit for clarity:
    The above is not saying that the different "systems" (see what I pointed out about "systems" in the code in previous posts) are co-mingled into the same vertical exhausts, each "system" is in its own vertical exhaust, thus there could be one, two, three, or more vertical exhausts: one for bathroom exhausts; one for fresh air; one for cooking appliances; and whatever else may be needed/installed (such as a shaft which contains refrigerant lines going to roof top units for a condo building).
    ~~~~~~~~

    For larger building (more units per floor), there may be multiple vertical exhaust for each 'stack of units' below it, or there may be one vertical exhaust for a 'group of stacked units' (typically not more than four units grouped around a vertical exhaust in the center of the 'group'.

    All depends on the designer and how they prefer to do things within the allowances of the codes.

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 07-27-2019 at 09:43 AM. Reason: see "Added with edit for clarity" part
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •