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  1. #1
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    Question Earthquake Strapping

    Just did an inspection on what is called a RV park, but the homes are secured as a mobile home would, however the water heater was actually under the sink and accessible from the outside, it was an electric and I think 19 gallon.would this require strapping, I see nothing about this size of needing anything.

    Thoughts ?DSCN6519 (450x338).jpg

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Reilly View Post
    it was an electric and I think 19 gallon.would this require strapping, I see nothing about this size of needing anything.
    Well I'm not in California, but please post the relevant code section that specifies the tank size and strapping requirements/exclusions, and we'll go from there. I thought all tanks required some form of strapping.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Also not from CA, but the first thing to do is to establish whether that is a "manufactured home" ("mobile home") or a "modular home".

    Manufactured homes are built to the HUD code, modular homes are built to the building code.

    The next thing to do, or maybe you already have, is to get the CA requirements for strapping of water heaters and determine what it states it is applicable to.

    Gunnar will likely have the answers to CA.

    Jerry Peck
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Reilly View Post
    Just did an inspection on what is called a RV park, but the homes are secured as a mobile home would, however the water heater was actually under the sink and accessible from the outside, it was an electric and I think 19 gallon.would this require strapping, I see nothing about this size of needing anything. Thoughts ?
    Hey Joe,

    I know nothing about RVs, so I can't comment on those. However, if it walks like a duck...

    In addition to manufactured/mobile homes, there are also very similar units called "Park Models" and "Park Trailers". These are more of a semi-permanent installation, but are intended to be moved. Just not as often or easily as a travel trailer. I have little real knowledge about them. To the best of my knowledge, these differ from MHs in size and jurisdiction. A MH must be a minimum of 320 sq.ft and falls under the jurisdiction of CA Housing and Community Development where Park Models and Park Trailers must be less than 450 sq.ft. and I have no idea what department has jurisdiction, but I believe they are considered RVs.

    So, the size might help to guide you to decide if this is a manufactured home or a park model/trailer.

    According to the California Health and Safety Code, water heaters in manufactured homes and mobile homes are required to be seismically braced. As stated above, I believe California regards park models as an RV, but I would think that water heaters should be braced for when they travel down the highway as well as seismically.

    https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/f...7.&lawCode=HSC

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  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Garland, TX
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    671

    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Reilly View Post
    Just did an inspection on what is called a RV park, but the homes are secured as a mobile home would, however the water heater was actually under the sink and accessible from the outside, it was an electric and I think 19 gallon.would this require strapping, I see nothing about this size of needing anything.

    Thoughts ?DSCN6519 (450x338).jpg
    hey joe,
    appears to be a bradford white unit
    all their install/service manuals as with most mfr spec
    Note: For California installation this water heater must be braced, anchored, or strapped to avoid falling or moving during an earthquake. See instructions for correct installation procedures. Instructions may be obtained from DSA Headquarters Office, 1102 Q Street, Suite 5100, Sacramento, CA 95811.

    advising an upgrade is within the written word regardless of housing type

    badair http://www.adairinspection.com Garland, TX 75042 TREC # 4563
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    If im not mistaken, I think mobil and modular home are governed by HUD here in CA.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc M View Post
    If im not mistaken, I think mobil and modular home are governed by HUD here in CA.
    Marc,

    A modular home is different from a manufactured home. Some types of modular homes include log homes, SIPs, and panelized. While modular homes are typically constructed in a factory setting and can easily be mistaken for manufactured homes, modular homes must conform to local codes and are inspected by the local AHJ. Construction of manufactured homes (commonly referred to as "mobile" homes) falls under the jurisdiction of HUD.

    HUD governs construction up to the point of first sale on the various types of manufactured homes (mobiles, park models, park trailers, etc.). California Housing and Community Development (HCD) takes over after the first sale and thereafter. Consequently, the home itself is built to the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (https://www.hud.gov/hudprograms/mhcss), but on-site modifications and additions, including decks, handrails and guardrails would be the responsibility of HCD.

    Yet another confusing part is that some manufactured homes will have an attached garage (I see these on private property rather than MH parks). The garage must meet local building codes but the attachment location on the home must meet HCD requirements.

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    (bold is mine)
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    A modular home is different from a manufactured home. Some types of modular homes include log homes, SIPs, and panelized. While modular homes are typically constructed in a factory setting and can easily be mistaken for manufactured homes, modular homes must conform to local codes and are inspected by the local AHJ. Construction of manufactured homes (commonly referred to as "mobile" homes) falls under the jurisdiction of HUD.
    Just asking for clarification in CA as modular homes (in Florida, and other places I know of) are "built to the applicable building code" and are "inspected at the factory" for code compliance.

    That means that while the modular home is, supposed to be, anyway, "built to code", the local AHJ does not inspect the modular home itself, just the setting and utility connections to the modular building.

    With log homes ... are they actually classified as "modular homes"? ... I can see them being inspected by the local AHJ as they are assembled piece by piece (just like 'stick built piece by piece', except that the pieces are larger) and the MEP systems installed piece by piece (just like for stick built homes).

    Thus my inquiry into clarification.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Jerry,

    You are correct, I misspoke (mis-typed?). To the best of my knowledge, the general term is "factory-built" home and log, modular, manufactured/mobile, and panelized are all different subtypes of that. So any of the homes (other than manufactured/mobile) will be inspected on-site by the local AHJ for engineering docs, foundation, roof, utility hookups, etc. Manufactured/mobile homes are inspected by a HCD inspector (in CA).

    I have always wondered about inspections on modular, etc. Manufactured is handled by HUD, but since the others fall under local building codes, and they are fabricated in another state, who handles inspections? Do they take the word of the factory or is there some third-party inspector who signs-off? On-site it is handled locally.

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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Earthquake Strapping

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    I have always wondered about inspections on modular, etc. Manufactured is handled by HUD, but since the others fall under local building codes, and they are fabricated in another state, who handles inspections? Do they take the word of the factory or is there some third-party inspector who signs-off? On-site it is handled locally.
    Gunnar,

    To my knowledge, the inspections are done third-party and/or kind of like UL listed - inspections are 'in-house' with scheduled and unscheduled site visits to verify that the 'in-house' inspections are being done properly.

    The risk of losing the certification for building modular buildings and using in-house inspections which do not meet code compliance is supposed to be sufficient to keep the in-house inspections honest ... yeah, right, it's more likely 'if we get caught cheating, you guys are fired' (meaning the in-house inspectors) ... and the company begs and pleads to no lose their certification if they replace those cheating inspectors ... at least that is what real-life is like when using in-house inspectors (and likely not much different when using third-party inspectors are the third-party inspectors are likely 'encouraged' to take as many lunch breaks as they want, and 'encouraged' to take continuing education classes where they are looking at code books and not the actual work.

    Of course, though, there are many AHJ where inspections are done by suspect inspectors, at best.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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