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  1. #66
    Philip's Avatar
    Philip Guest

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Balloon construction? I saw one of them in my area in thirty years. Air conditioning, been around since the 50's. Hey, I jumped on this band wagon in 1980, Sunny-Side Up, Energy and Conservation Co. I was installing flat plate solar collectors, reflective window films, insulation, ceiling fans, and an air to water heat pump that was installed inside the house. Then Carter went away and Reagan came in and we went from an energy crisis to drive up windows at the fast food joints. My advice is to avoid anything the government has to do with, and you can do an energy audit without $$$%%$$ investment.

    F.I.R.E. Services

  2. #67
    Philip's Avatar
    Philip Guest

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    And I know which direction the Infared camera is pointed.


  3. #68
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    L
    Let's see, we now need a another third party expert to certify the second and first experts.
    The first and second parties do not necessarily have to be experts.

    third party - a person other than the parties directly involved in a transaction, often with no interest or less interest that the primary parties in the transaction

    Example - Party #1 is selling his house. Party #2 has a contract to buy the house from Party #1. Party #2 hires Party #3 to perform a home inspection on the house. The home inspector (Party #3) is a disinterested third party because he has no interest in the transaction (the sale of the house).


    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    I will go on record once again. This is so much bull. Conditioned air has been escaping from houses in exactly the same way for centuries. It is conduction, convection and radiant.
    Heat (not air) flows via conduction, convection and radiation. Conditioned air (or any air for that matter) flows from a higher pressure to a lower pressure. Yes, air will flow due to convection (e.g., at a window or sliding glass door) but I have never seen air flow via conduction.

    "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand." Leo Durocher
    Bruce Breedlove
    www.avaloninspection.com

  4. #69
    Philip's Avatar
    Philip Guest

    Question Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Breedlove View Post
    The first and second parties do not necessarily have to be experts.

    third party - a person other than the parties directly involved in a transaction, often with no interest or less interest that the primary parties in the transaction

    Example - Party #1 is selling his house. Party #2 has a contract to buy the house from Party #1. Party #2 hires Party #3 to perform a home inspection on the house. The home inspector (Party #3) is a disinterested third party because he has no interest in the transaction (the sale of the house).




    Heat (not air) flows via conduction, convection and radiation. Conditioned air (or any air for that matter) flows from a higher pressure to a lower pressure. Yes, air will flow due to convection (e.g., at a window or sliding glass door) but I have never seen air flow via conduction.
    I was referring to heat loss or heat gain. If warm air comes into contact with a cold surface, what happens? Heat goes to cold. There is no such thing as cold, there is only the absence of heat. Glazing is rated in U-factors and walls and ceilings as R-factor.
    You can buy into this, but what I see is another example of "authorities" making laws so they can enforce them, much like the new lead paint laws.
    That is if I am reading right, that new homes (and later older homes) will have to have a certificate of energy efficiency along with the termite documents in order for an exchange of ownership. Did I read something wrong? The third expert is auditing the findings of the second expert.


  5. #70
    martyall's Avatar
    martyall Guest

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Thanks for the informations of how to train some energy auditor. I hope they will learn from it.


  6. #71
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Except for where energy audits are required by the government or subsidized, there just isn't much consumer demand for the service.

    The real consumer demand will come from home energy scoring. This is the future. Read about how it will help inspectors here. Again, this is the future. Your future.

    Lisa Endza
    Director of Communication
    InterNACHI

  7. #72
    David Hamilton's Avatar
    David Hamilton Guest

    Default FREE Energy Audit online training courses!

    Here are some FREE Energy Audit online training courses!

    Energy Audits
    This course will review the different types of audits, the overall auditing process as well as the auditing methodology which will help prepare you to successfully participate in the energy audit process.


    Energy Audits Instrumentation I
    This course will review electrical, lighting, temperature and humidity measurement instruments that are used in energy audits.


    Energy Audits Instrumentation II
    As a continuation of Energy Audits Instrumentation I, the purpose of this course is to review the measurement instruments used in energy audits in order to select and employ the appropriate instrument for your auditing needs.


    If you are interested in free energy efficiency e-learning courses, I recommend you have a look at the Energy University.
    http://www.schneider-electric.com.au/sites/australia/en/company/energy-university-free-online-training.page



  8. #73
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Those courses aren't approved. InterNACHI's Energy Audit courses are approved.

    Lisa Endza
    Director of Communication
    InterNACHI

  9. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Flintville, TN
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    I just went to the sites you posted and they are far from free!!





    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Earl View Post
    Hi,

    iCAST (International Center for Appropriate & Sustainable Technology) is a non-profit corporation that is offering free online courses in Residential Energy Efficiency and Solar Power Systems. These courses were produced in partnership with the WIRED program, a federally funded program. The current course offerings are introductory courses and are online versions of 1 week long classroom courses:


    Residential Energy Efficiency Auditor Online Training
    This first course prepares students with backgrounds in construction, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, as well as IT, marketing, sales, administration, and operations how to perform a residential energy audit. Imparted knowledge includes building science and the home as an integrated system, HVAC systems, utility bill analysis, auditing appliances, lighting, and water. The course prepares participants for technical careers but is also valuable for people interested in non-technical support positions



    Solar Power Systems Installation Online Training
    In this course participants will be given an introduction to the concepts, technology, and procedures associated with assessing and installing Solar PV and Solar Thermal systems. Part of the course will also cover business and operational aspects of the solar industry relating to being a contractor or subcontractor. There will also be a panel of solar industry professionals who will discuss career paths, training and certification opportunities.


    To enroll in these free courses please go to:
    iCAST Training


    For more information about iCAST go to:
    iCAST's Main Website


    Thanks


    Skip Earl
    Online Training Manager
    iCAST



  10. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Flintville, TN
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    It just tells me I cannot enroll myself????






    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Iascone View Post
    I just went to the sites you posted and they are far from free!!



  11. #76
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    Sep 2011
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    Greater St. Louis MO
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    13

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    There is a non-profit called Conservation Services Group, Conservation Services Group (CSG) | Promoting Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Resources
    who have partnered up with some utility companies to do an energy audit for FREE on your home.
    Tough to compete with the cost!!
    They will supply new CFL bulbs, new faucet aretors and shower heads and seal any cracks that they can. All at no cost.
    It's a terrific deal to the homeowner, but in my area, the home had to be all electric.


  12. #77
    David Hamilton's Avatar
    David Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Hi Nicholas Iascone, here is an Energy Audit course which is FREE!
    There are also over 80+ other free 'energy efficiency' courses on offer which all take around 1 hour to complete.

    The energy audit course is available from the Energy University...
    e-learning - My Energy University

    Good Luck!


  13. #78
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Lisa Endza
    Director of Communication
    InterNACHI

  14. #79
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    Chicago IL
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    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Barker View Post
    Sorry to mess up the conversation but I see bad news in these energy audits. Tightening up homes will lead to increased indoor pollution and respiratory problems for their occupants. I've been through the energy classes and they are seriously lacking in good sound information - mainly because their instructors are poorly trained in IAQ.

    No doubt that energy audit inspectors will make money. But also no doubt that homeowners will be left with new problems. But, "optimistically," that will open some other new field down the road for inspectors to jump on.
    For sure. However that doesn't mean that audits shouldn't be performed. It means that auditors should be properly trained. The IAQ issues all have work arounds; whether it's installing new sealed combustion equipment or an ERV or any other of a wide range of improvements to combustion safety and IAQ.

    I don't think it's fair to pooh-pooh an entire industry because of some unqualified practitioners.

    Dan Cullen
    www.domicileconsulting.com
    Chicago IL

  15. #80
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    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    53

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    I think much new conversation is needed here.

    My attitudes and thoughts are expressed here. Where I wish to try out and critique auditing as simply assigning some number, I find useful push by US Department of Energy, that self-trained exceptional me, every professional home inspector, and other professionals, are invited to participate, offered free online training. I doubt that numbers motivate the large investments in efficiency that are needed. It is the work we want done, that no home is sold with defects of energy gluttony or impending shell failure, passed on to the buyer without deduction from the sale price. I think needed investments and their consequences must be itemized. A home energy score mandate does not generate the work list or work completion. Motivation of investments comes in fair, high cost of energy not derived in criminal, insane destruction by fracking and tar sands extraction, then ruining all life on Earth through leaked-methane and CO2 consequences. Add motivation too in new funding mechanisms, free financing to the home owner. However we do this, home inspectors will be involved. Maybe all will wait for an end of stolen government by know-nothings.

    The need for Home Inspector training and involvement in home energy efficiency is brought to my attention today in today's feed to my email, Photo 3. Someone asks, "what else is wrong here?", and I mean to respond about very-awful HVAC ducts evidently in an attic probably over a garage, where there is a not-insulated attic wall. I wonder then what this home inspector is compelled to report about details of energy efficiency in general. I got deeply involved in energy code development, in 2016, discouraged to realize that IECC does not apply to existing homes. Perhaps we must work for new direction from IECC, introduced in Year-2021 revisions.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I think much new conversation is needed here.

    My attitudes and thoughts are expressed here. Where I wish to try out and critique auditing as simply assigning some number, I find useful push by US Department of Energy, that self-trained exceptional me, every professional home inspector, and other professionals, are invited to participate, offered free online training. I doubt that numbers motivate the large investments in efficiency that are needed. It is the work we want done, that no home is sold with defects of energy gluttony or impending shell failure, passed on to the buyer without deduction from the sale price. I think needed investments and their consequences must be itemized. A home energy score mandate does not generate the work list or work completion. Motivation of investments comes in fair, high cost of energy not derived in criminal, insane destruction by fracking and tar sands extraction, then ruining all life on Earth through leaked-methane and CO2 consequences. Add motivation too in new funding mechanisms, free financing to the home owner. However we do this, home inspectors will be involved. Maybe all will wait for an end of stolen government by know-nothings.

    The need for Home Inspector training and involvement in home energy efficiency is brought to my attention today in today's feed to my email, Photo 3. Someone asks, "what else is wrong here?", and I mean to respond about very-awful HVAC ducts evidently in an attic probably over a garage, where there is a not-insulated attic wall. I wonder then what this home inspector is compelled to report about details of energy efficiency in general. I got deeply involved in energy code development, in 2016, discouraged to realize that IECC does not apply to existing homes. Perhaps we must work for new direction from IECC, introduced in Year-2021 revisions.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I think much new conversation is needed here.

    My attitudes and thoughts are expressed here. Where I wish to try out and critique auditing as simply assigning some number, I find useful push by US Department of Energy, that self-trained exceptional me, every professional home inspector, and other professionals, are invited to participate, offered free online training. I doubt that numbers motivate the large investments in efficiency that are needed. It is the work we want done, that no home is sold with defects of energy gluttony or impending shell failure, passed on to the buyer without deduction from the sale price. I think needed investments and their consequences must be itemized. A home energy score mandate does not generate the work list or work completion. Motivation of investments comes in fair, high cost of energy not derived in criminal, insane destruction by fracking and tar sands extraction, then ruining all life on Earth through leaked-methane and CO2 consequences. Add motivation too in new funding mechanisms, free financing to the home owner. However we do this, home inspectors will be involved. Maybe all will wait for an end of stolen government by know-nothings.

    The need for Home Inspector training and involvement in home energy efficiency is brought to my attention today in today's feed to my email, Photo 3. Someone asks, "what else is wrong here?", and I mean to respond about very-awful HVAC ducts evidently in an attic probably over a garage, where there is a not-insulated attic wall. I wonder then what this home inspector is compelled to report about details of energy efficiency in general. I got deeply involved in energy code development, in 2016, discouraged to realize that IECC does not apply to existing homes. Perhaps we must work for new direction from IECC, introduced in Year-2021 revisions.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I think much new conversation is needed here.<br>
    <br>
    My attitudes and thoughts are expressed <a href="http://energyconservationhowto.blogspot.com/search/label/Home%20Energy%20Score" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">here</a>. Where I wish to try out and critique auditing as simply assigning some <em>number</em>, I find useful push by US Department of Energy, that self-trained exceptional me, every professional home inspector, and other professionals, are invited to participate, offered free online training. I doubt that <em>numbers</em> motivate the large investments in efficiency that are needed. It is the work we want done, that no home is sold with defects of energy gluttony or impending shell failure, passed on to the buyer without deduction from the sale price. I think needed investments and their consequences must be itemized. A home energy score mandate does not generate the work list or work completion. Motivation of investments comes in <strong>fair, high cost of energy</strong> not derived in criminal, insane destruction by fracking and tar sands extraction, then ruining all life on Earth through leaked-methane and CO2 consequences. Add motivation too in new funding mechanisms, free financing to the home owner. However we do this, home inspectors will be involved. Maybe all will wait for an end of stolen government by know-nothings.<br>
    <br>
    The need for Home Inspector training and involvement in home energy efficiency is brought to my attention today in <a href="http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_inspection/showthread.php?t=47570" target="_blank">today's feed to my email</a>, Photo 3. Someone asks, "what else is wrong here?", and I mean to respond about very-awful HVAC ducts evidently in an attic probably over a garage, where there is a not-insulated <a href="http://energyconservationhowto.blogspot.com/search/label/Attic%20Wall%20Insulation" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">attic wall</a>. I wonder then what this home inspector is compelled to report about details of energy efficiency in general. I got deeply involved in <a href="http://energyconservationhowto.blogspot.com/search/label/Building%20Codes" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">energy code development</a>, in 2016, discouraged to realize that IECC does not apply to existing homes. Perhaps we must work for new direction from IECC, introduced in Year-2021 revisions.

    Last edited by Phillip Norman; 01-20-2017 at 06:04 AM. Reason: Duplicated as Post #81. This got corrupted during attempted preview and submission.

  16. #81
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    I think much new conversation is needed here.

    My attitudes and thoughts are expressed here. Where I wish to try out and critique auditing as simply assigning some number, I find useful push by US Department of Energy, that self-trained exceptional me, every professional home inspector, and other professionals, are invited to participate, offered free online training. I doubt that numbers motivate the large investments in efficiency that are needed. It is the work we want done, that no home is sold with defects of energy gluttony or impending shell failure, passed on to the buyer without deduction from the sale price. I think needed investments and their consequences must be itemized. A home energy score mandate does not generate the work list or work completion. Motivation of investments comes in fair, high cost of energy not derived in criminal, insane destruction by fracking and tar sands extraction, then ruining all life on Earth through leaked-methane and CO2 consequences. Add motivation too in new funding mechanisms, free financing to the home owner. However we do this, home inspectors will be involved. Maybe all will wait for an end of stolen government by know-nothings.

    The need for Home Inspector training and involvement in home energy efficiency is brought to my attention today in today's feed to my email, Photo 3. Someone asks, "what else is wrong here?", and I mean to respond about very-awful HVAC ducts evidently in an attic probably over a garage, where there is a not-insulated attic wall. I wonder then what this home inspector is compelled to report about details of energy efficiency in general. I got deeply involved in energy code development, in 2016, discouraged to realize that IECC does not apply to existing homes. Perhaps we must work for new direction from IECC, introduced in Year-2021 revisions.


  17. #82
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Denver
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    893

    Default Re: Training needed to become energy auditor?

    Lisa Endza
    Director of Communication
    InterNACHI

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