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Thread: IECC 2006 505

  1. #1
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    Default IECC 2006 505

    Hello All,

    Looking for your opinions pertaining to the 2006 International Energy Code, Section 505.2.2.1 Light reduction controls.

    Based on allowable means # 1, It is my take that this can be accomplished with dimmers. Dimmers being self contained in place of a switch or through a dimmer control system.

    Thoughts, opinions appreciated.

    Thanks

    Corey Friedman

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    Corey,

    I would say yes, #1 simply states "Controlling all lamps or luminaires", which could be by a dimmer, dimmer control system, which could include lowering the energy use and output of "each" lamp, "all" lamps, "each" fixture, or "all" fixtures.

    You may even have fixtures which are wired such as to allow 1/2 of the lamps to be turned off, leaving the other half of the lamps on (see #4, that is similar).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  3. #3
    Jeff Remas's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    A dimmer control system would be acceptable under 505.2.2.1 number 1.

    Don't forget about the fact that the reduction needs to be "reasonably uniform".

    Is the building larger than 5,000. square feet?


  4. #4
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Remas View Post
    A dimmer control system would be acceptable under 505.2.2.1 number 1.

    Don't forget about the fact that the reduction needs to be "reasonably uniform".

    Is the building larger than 5,000. square feet?

    Hi Jeff,

    The building is over 5000 sq. ft.

    Corey


  5. #5
    Jeff Remas's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    Quote Originally Posted by Corey Friedman View Post
    Hi Jeff,

    The building is over 5000 sq. ft.

    Corey

    Then the automatic lighting shutoff will apply too. See 505.2.2.2
    There are only a few exceptions for that requirement.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    Jerry and Jeff,

    Thanks

    Sincerely,

    Corey


  7. #7
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    I am now reluctant to suggest dimmers to my residential new construction clients until I do more research. The reason for my reluctance is that I am being told that compact flourescent lights have problems with dimmers. With the upcoming law requiring the replacement of incandescent lighting this would become a cost for clients who install dimmers now.

    I will be doing a full "self education" on this question starting with the questions in this post. Is there really incompatibility between dimmers and compact flourescents? Will they not work together or is there just no ability to dim? Are there safety concerns? Are there concerns about shortened bulb or dimmer life?

    Thanks in advance.

    Darrel Hood
    DILIGENT PROPERTY SERVICES


  8. #8
    Jeff Remas's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    They are starting to make CFL that are dimmable but there are not many.

    LED's seem to be the light of the future but the cost is high. Can light conversion kits are over a $100. a piece and they have dimming issues too because they are off of a transformer.

    It is real easy to change a dimmer back to a switch if they need to so I would not worry about your recommendation.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    There has always been a problem with dimming fluorescent lights.

    Back ... okay, way back when I was in lighting some 30 years ago ... there were special "dimming ballasts" for fluorescent lights, and those took special dimmers too (as I recall).

    I just did a search using The Force (Google) searching "dimmable cfl" and the first 3 pages (as far as I went back) were *nothing but* links to "dimmable cfl" information about the and where to buy them.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  10. #10
    Jeff Remas's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    The electrical supply house has CFL bulbs for sale that are labeled "dimmable".

    I will look into it and let you know what brand.


  11. #11
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    So, as far as dimmable CFL, the only concern is the cost which appears to be 3 to 5 times the cost of non-dimmable. Nobody knows of safety or equipment life concerns? This is probably not a big deal since most homes won't have a large quantity. Thanks for the feedback. I will do a little more research and post if I find any additional concerns.

    Darrel Hood
    DILIGENT PROPERTY SERVICES


  12. #12
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    Quote Originally Posted by Darrel Hood View Post
    So, as far as dimmable CFL, the only concern is the cost
    Well, there *are* environmental concerns with those CFL.

    Such as "disposal" and "clean-up after breaking one".

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  13. #13
    Robert Silva's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Remas View Post
    They are starting to make CFL that are dimmable but there are not many.

    LED's seem to be the light of the future but the cost is high. Can light conversion kits are over a $100. a piece and they have dimming issues too because they are off of a transformer.

    It is real easy to change a dimmer back to a switch if they need to so I would not worry about your recommendation.
    While it is true that LED's are the future of lighting, and that they are expensive and many have dimming issues, you should know that there is an affordable LED option now. CREE Lighting Cree Inc : Cree LED Lighting Solutions : the first and only general illumination LED system that provides beautiful color, high efficiency and eco-friendly technology
    offers a great LED recessed can, that has a 50,000 hour warranty, built in electronics allow for dimability with conventional slider or knob dimmers and only cost a little over $100. I specificy lights all the time, and I am telling you this is half to 1/3 the cost of similar LED lights out there. And many of the competitors required special dimmer switches and transformers. You would do well to investigate CREE.


  14. #14
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    The biggest issue with dimmers and CFL's is when it comes time to replace them .
    Will the homeowner realize that they need a dimmable CFL ?

    Start dimming standard CFL's and they have a tendency to catch on fire.


  15. #15
    John Steinke's Avatar
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    Default Re: IECC 2006 505

    The sundry energy codes are a great example of 'code gone bad.' As such, they ought not be enforved, applied ... and certainly not referenced in any 'home inspection.' If there was a better instance of code intruding into design matters, I'd be hard pressed to identify it .... though the 'green' codes will likely do so.

    The first problem is that they reduce lighting levels. Apart from a built-in conflict with fire codes (which continue to increase the required lighting), they ignore the many studies that associate increased lighting with increased production, safety, and overall happiness. Just try to comply with both lighting level design guides and the energy codes - it can't be done.

    Then there is the 'one size fits all' attitude, coupled with the inherent 'we can't trust the folks on site' bias. The timer requirement, limiting the period that programmed controls can be locally over-ridden, is a case in point.

    How? Well, imagine your school has become the site of basketball finals (try scheduling THAT years in advance!). Game day comes, and the automatic program is over-ridden for the "big game.' The intense game has just gone into overtime when CLUNK, the program kicks back in (after the maximum 2 hour bypass period) and shuts the lights off. Now you have a stadium of angry fans .... and the HID stadium lights need 20 minutes to re-strike. Everyone gets to exit in the dark.

    Virtually all of the whiz-bang stuff the energy codes rely upon is problematic. Motion sensors? Unreliable, and with problems if the occupant is either out of view, or relatively immobile (as in sitting at a computer monitor). Dimmers? With all the heat they generate, I'm not sure how much energy is really saved ... and the conflict with many lamp types is legendary.

    Dimmers, timers, motion sensors, etc., also have issues in 3-way and 4-way switch applications.

    CFL's that use ordinary light sockets - dimmable or not - don't make the grade simply because someone MIGHT replace them with ordinary bulbs. Nor will CFL's, in many cases, actually fit in the fixture. Dimmable CFL's are even larger. You're stuck replacing $8 fixtures with $120 ones .... lovely.

    LED's, all the press releases aside, simply are not quite there yet. Don't let anyone kid you - the back side of LED bulbs gets HOT. Nor are you able to focus the beam nearly as well as you can with an incandescent.

    Naturally, the energy codes will guarantee that you can make every HI report the size of the local phone book. You can be certain that none of the closet lights, counter lights, or hallway lights were on the plans submitted for the 'energy audit,' but were added later. Ditto for at least half of the recessed cans you see, and most of the track lighting. Any task-specific light is suspect.


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