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  1. #1
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    I'm a home builder in rural part of Travis county. We're outside city limits, but technically in the ETJ of a City. The city (Lago Vista) holds no inspection or enforcement actions on properties in the ETJ.

    My self and our GC have had the intention of complying with the following:

    "Electrical work in unincorporated areas: 2008 Nat'l Electric Code (NEC) is the applicable code for any non-exempt electrical work started/after Mon., Sept. 1, 2008. To clarify, the "start" of electrical work is the day the electrician begins installing electrical materials or equipment w/in the residential or commercial building structure"

    I became much more familiar with the 2008 NEC (compared to the 2005 NEC) after recognizing a significant price difference in electrical contractor bids associated with implementing the respective codes.

    Our home is done, perhaps minus some finish out items and final system hook up. I've noticed that we're deficient of the 2008 NEC as the home only has AFCI circuits for the master bedroom.

    The electrical contractor is saying that the AFCI implementation was somehow timing exempt for this project - are there "addendums" to the 2008 NEC that are pending acceptance or otherwise not an accepted part of the 2008 NEC that I need to know about? I suspect that this contractor doesn't want to spring for the cost of 15 AFCI breakers...


    Particular code references we're in violation of currently:

    2008 NEC 210.12 expands the AFCI protection requirement into other rooms of the house:
    210.12(B)Dwelling Units.
    All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sun rooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways , or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type installed to provide protection of the branch circuits....

    210.8(A)(2) & (A)(5): Expanded GFCI protection requirements by deleting exceptions for receptacles that are not readily accessible and receptacles located in dedicated spaces to supply an appliance

    • 210.8(B)(4): Expanded GFCI protection requirements to include all outdoor 15- and 20-ampere, 125-volt receptacles, and added a conditional exception to permit use of assured equipment grounding conductor program in industrial establishments.

    • 210.8(B)(5): Added GFCI protection requirements for all 15- and 20-ampere 125-volt receptacles installed within 6 ft of the outside edge of sinks, and added exceptions for receptacles in industrial laboratories where the loss of power would introduce a greater hazard and for receptacles in patient care areas where critical care equipment may be utilized.


    Construction start date: 10/2008. We're not covered by a "start date" exclusion.. good question though..



    Similar Threads:
    Last edited by Darin Ginther; 03-18-2009 at 03:02 PM. Reason: added start date.
    NHIE Practice Exam

  2. #2
    Jake Guerrero's Avatar
    Jake Guerrero Guest

    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Not that I am aware of. Jerry Peck will be along here in a little while with more information. The additional requirements for AFCI and GFCI you listed were part of the 2008 NEC. To my knowledge, there was not a delayed 'start' for the new AFCI and GFCI requirements; I think that is what you are asking.

    I attended the local building conference and took a 'sigfincant changes to the 2008 NEC' class. There was no in mention that those requirements were delayed - however JP likely has more info.

    Puzzled why only the master bedroom has AFCI?


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Curious, because with all the information provided I didn't see the answer to this question: When was your start date?


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    I'll have to dig it up but I believe when the State of Texas implemented the 2008 NEC that the requirement for AFCI's were a January 1st 2009 requirement.

    What I am saying is that IF a structure was started prior to Jan 1 then you wouldn't have to comply with the 2008 NEC. Anything after Jan 1 would have to comply. The Jan 1 date was the adoption date that the state was to start enforcing the 2008 NEC.

    I'll have to dig out the information and let you know for sure but that is my first thought on it!

    OK dug a little...the Jan 1 date was for the "combination" AFCI's


    Combination devices required after 1 Jan 2008
    : Simplifying a bit, after January 1, 2008, AFCI
    protection must be provided by a "
    Combination AFCI's" . That's because these are an improved arc
    fault interrupter product that offer much more sensitive arc fault detection (5 A arc peaks as opposed to 75 A arc peak detection).



    Last edited by Wayne Carlisle; 03-18-2009 at 02:19 PM. Reason: Added last paragrah but will still dig some more

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rural TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Quote Originally Posted by Darin Ginther View Post
    "Electrical work in unincorporated areas: 2008 Nat'l Electric Code (NEC) is the applicable code for any non-exempt electrical work started/after Mon., Sept. 1, 2008. To clarify, the "start" of electrical work is the day the electrician begins installing electrical materials or equipment w/in the residential or commercial building structure"
    Darin,

    First, and specifically of great importance, what was the date the electrician began installing electrical materials or equipment within the residential construction project?

    While you did not say, I am presuming that they started after Monday, September 1, 2008. I am presuming that because you are asking about the 2008 NEC, which would not have been applicable prior to that date.

    Thus, given that my presumption is correct, your electrician is trying to get out of installing AFCI protection for the circuits covered by the 2008 NEC which were not covered under the 2005 NEC.

    This is the 2008 NEC AFCI requirement section and is what your electrician is required to follow:
    - 210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.
    - - (A) Definition: Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI). A device intended to provide protection from the effects of arc faults by recognizing characteristics unique to arcing and by functioning to de-energize the circuit when an arc fault is detected.
    - - (B) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.
    - - - FPN No. 1: For information on types of arc-fault circuit interrupters, see UL 1699-1999, Standard for Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupters.
    - - - FPN No. 2: See 11.6.3(5) of NFPA 72®-2007, National Fire Alarm Code®, for information related to secondary power supply requirements for smoke alarms installed in dwelling units.
    - - - FPN No. 3: See 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) for power-supply requirements for fire alarm systems.
    - - - Exception No. 1: Where RMC, IMC, EMT or steel armored cable, Type AC, meeting the requirements of 250.118 using metal outlet and junction boxes is installed for the portion of the branch circuit between the branch-circuit overcurrent device and the first outlet, it shall be permitted to install a combination AFCI at the first outlet to provide protection for the remaining portion of the branch circuit.
    - - - Exception No. 2: Where a branch circuit to a fire alarm system installed in accordance with 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) is installed in RMC, IMC, EMT, or steel armored cable, Type AC, meeting the requirements of 250.118, with metal outlet and junction boxes, AFCI protection shall be permitted to be omitted.

    It sounds to me as though your electrician is saying that 'his timing was off' and therefore, AFCI protection is 'timing exempt' because he did not plan on installing AFCI breakers for all of the circuits required to have AFCI protection.

    You are correct. Your home is basically required to have AFCI protection for all circuits which are not GFCI protected. The GFCI protected circuits should include: bathroom receptacle outlets, kitchen receptacle outlets, garage receptacle outlets, laundry/utility/wet bar sink receptacle outlets, exterior receptacle outlets, and, if you have a basement or crawl space - receptacle outlets in unfinished basements and crawl spaces (I should add, to round the list out, boathouses if you have a boathouse)

    You will likely notice that the list for AFCI protection and the list for GFCI protection are for different rooms/areas, yet when the two lists are combined, they are basically all inclusive for all of the circuits for a house.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    This is from the NEMA web site.

    So it all depends on when electrical work started.


    Texas Commission Reduces Safety Rules in Unincorporated Areas

    On September 1, 2008, the Texas State Legislature passed House Bill 1038, which requires that residential construction, both new and remodel, completed by builders in unincorporated areas or in areas not subject to municipal inspections must have a minimum of three inspections conducted by a fee inspector. This new inspection program will be administered by the Texas Residential Construction Commission (TRCC). The commission is comprised of nine members appointed by the governor including four registered builders, three general public members, one residential construction engineer, and one residential construction architect or inspector.
    The code requirements for this new inspection program, however, immediately raises questions as the statewide residential building codes are the 2000 International Residential Code® and the 1999 National Electrical Code® unless amended by a local jurisdiction or if the county seat has adopted an updated version of these codes. This is in direct conflict with the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation's adoption of the 2008 Edition of the NEC effective September 1, 2008. When asked about the use of the 1999 NEC for residential electrical installations in unincorporated areas of Texas, a TDLR representative stated, "We maintain that any non-exempt electrical work started on or after September 1, 2008, in the unincorporated areas of Texas must be installed in accordance with the NEC 2008."
    This is further evidence that the homebuilders industry, which appears to have undue influence on the TRCC, does not support the same level of safety involving electrical installations and other building code advancements that have been incorporated into the latest building code editions including the 2008 NEC. There are many other states including Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Georgia, Tennessee, and Florida, where the homebuilders associations have fought to stall the adoption of the latest safety codes. Their goal is simply not to adopt the latest building code safety technologies whatever the negative impact may be to new home buyers and their families!
    To enact a law that adopts a ten year old electrical safety code is an insult to the home buying public and does nothing to serve their interests or the continuing increase in public safety!
    Vince Baclawski



  7. #7
    Bob Spermo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Darin,

    Because the TRCC and the TDLR call for different requirements this is a difficult question to answer. Does Lago Vista endorse any building codes? I doubt it! Then the county seat - Austin rules - what IRC and NEC were in effect when building began. According to the TRCC your house should be built to these rules. Were phase inspections conducted? They should have been conducted under the codes in effect in Austin. A TRCC inspection holds the builder to the codes adopted by the county seat. However, the TDLR (which licenses electricians) says that electrical work started by a licensed electrician after 9/1/08 will use the 2008 NEC. I have talked many times to the TRCC and the TDLR. Here is their answer to me - conduct the phase inspection under TRCC guidelines (county seat adopted codes or Texas adopted codes if county seat has no adopted codes). You can only hold the builder to these codes. The TDLR agrees but then said I have to tell the builder and the electrician they are using the incorrect code and the electrician if there is an inspection of his work by the TDLR will have a license issue. Pretty screwed up!

    In order to change the TRCC working rules it requires new legislation. The TDLR in its enabling statute is required to use the most current code. They both claim they are working on the problem!


  8. #8
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Spermo View Post
    Darin,

    Because the TRCC and the TDLR call for different requirements this is a difficult question to answer. Does Lago Vista endorse any building codes? I doubt it! Then the county seat - Austin rules - what IRC and NEC were in effect when building began. According to the TRCC your house should be built to these rules. Were phase inspections conducted? They should have been conducted under the codes in effect in Austin. A TRCC inspection holds the builder to the codes adopted by the county seat. However, the TDLR (which licenses electricians) says that electrical work started by a licensed electrician after 9/1/08 will use the 2008 NEC. I have talked many times to the TRCC and the TDLR. Here is their answer to me - conduct the phase inspection under TRCC guidelines (county seat adopted codes or Texas adopted codes if county seat has no adopted codes). You can only hold the builder to these codes. The TDLR agrees but then said I have to tell the builder and the electrician they are using the incorrect code and the electrician if there is an inspection of his work by the TDLR will have a license issue. Pretty screwed up!

    In order to change the TRCC working rules it requires new legislation. The TDLR in its enabling statute is required to use the most current code. They both claim they are working on the problem!

    Lago Vista subscribes to the 2005 NEC.
    We are in the Lago Vista ETJ, but Lago Vista does not interject or require building standards for structures within the ETJ. To be perfectly honest, I don't know what the heck a Lago Vista ETJ serves - maybe just a precursor to annexation.



    Per:
    Electrician Licensing Frequently Asked Questions

    13. I'm performing electrical work in an unincorporated area (i.e. no permits required) - what electrical code must I comply with?
    The applicable code until August 31, 2008 is the National Electrical Code (NEC) 2005 Edition. Any non-exempt electrical work started on or after September 1, 2008, in the unincorporated areas of Texas must be installed in accordance with NEC 2008. For purposes of clarification, the “start” of electrical work is the day the electrician begins installing electrical materials or equipment within the residential or commercial building structure.



  9. #9
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Pretty simple really, The most restrictive code wins.
    Yeah, the TRCC inspector can only hold the electrician and builder to the older standard, but the TDLR is the agency that the electrician answers to. (Even a good bluff is likely to get a change in attitude.)
    If you get any guff about making it meet the 2008 NEC, just tell the electrician, fine, but you will be calling for a review of his work through the TDLR to make sure it meets the most current standard.
    Too bad you did not have it stipulated in the contract.

    By the way, if there is only protection for the master bedroom, it is wrong even by the 2005 NEC since ALL bedrooms had to be protected.

    Also, TREC inspectors are required to call out missing AFCI protection as a deficiency on ALL houses, regardless of age.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  10. #10
    Fred Warner's Avatar
    Fred Warner Guest

    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Not trying to be mean-spirited by any means, but Texas seems to have some pretty confusing rules and regs. Or at least it seems that way to me, having never been there and having no regional experience with their rules.

    I wish all the states had uniformity in standards and their application and enforcement.


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Thank you for returning to your original post and adding the information regarding the start date, and for clarifying what your concerns are with your subsequent posting(s).

    I am confused as to if you have passed final inspections, etc. since you mentioned "our home is done".

    If I'm following your meaning correctly you have a few issues. I agree with other posters that as you describe your project, if the project contains more than one bedroom and only the one bedroom is served by the solitary arc fault protection there would be an issue even with 2005. There was a deadline future for requiring combination (at the panel with the OCPD) protection from the panel in the 2005 for all bedrooms. Several incorporated jurisdictions in Texas had local ammendments regarding the adoption of both 2005 and 2008 NEC which changes the language. You mentioned you don't know what if any authority the local area adjacent authority has or what it the area is. I would suggest you ask.

    Regarding your specific situation and/or "after the fact" possible concerns, I don't think we can "help" much.

    It seems that an authority having jurisdiction has made it clear that you will be inspected per unammended 2008 NEC with a uniform FAQ declaration, but that there is another authority that may or may not have responsiblity but not authority and an older (lesser) standard...however...keep in mind that the expense labor and materials to improve to even minimum 2008 NEC even possibly better than minimum 2008 would likely not be objected to by either authority as the codes are minimum standards not restrictive or limiting of better than minimum, and the expenses of time, financing, delays, possible fines, legal fees, court costs, might make even absorbing those expenses cost effective.

    It might even be possible, (unknown circumstances temp power to work site within structure, etc.) that your understanding of the official start date *might* be earlier - again something possibly you *might* request a ruling on?

    You might consider addressing a written inquiry and request a ruling from the two authorities - strictly on the issue of which standard will be required and inspected to and ask that they coordinate that in their response. An attorney might help you with this.

    Since time appears of the essence you might want to address this quickly so should you need to additionally consult both state authorities/commissions and/or commerce dept. for clarification/coordination of application, there might be time to do so.

    Regarding the financial responsibility for the changes this would require an interpretation of the language of the contract(s). Not something we could do here.

    You might be best served to address the contract/financial responsibility/change order expenses to a local attorney familiar with construction/consumer law(s), contracts, and the state constitution and codes. If necessary to request a declatory opinion from a local court.

    The 2008 NEC as a minimum standard affords more protection rather than less generally meaning safer more secure system for both equipment and persons. It generally also affords less risk therefore lower HO premiums, etc.

    A combination ARC fault/OCPD supplied circuit can be further GFCI protected with a dead-front GFCI device or a GFCI combo receptacle.
    There are a multitude of other changes in the 2008 NEC besides GFCIs and ARC fault protection zones for residences.

    Admittatedly, confused, is this a home you are building by acting as your own GC (and using a consultant), or that you have contracted with a GC who is responsible for all including the sub-trades such as electrical? Yet to pass final inspections? Or are you consulting as an in-progress inspector or acting as your own?

    Your current/future attorney may suggest you hire a professional construction/inspection consultant to do that (inspection, review, report) for you and represent your interests and review work done, in progress, through completion.

    I did not find the FAQ list with the same item you quoted at the link you provided but I did find these:

    Local Electrical Requirements
    TDLR has a webpage list of local electrical requirements (i.e. code, permitting, licensing, etc.) for many cities throughout the state. We encourage you to review the most current information that we have on record for your city at <http://www.license.state.tx.us/electricians/forms/citylist.pdf>. Attention city officials: if you have not provided TDLR with your local requirements, OR if you need to update us on any changes, please do so by utilizing the Municipal Electricians Requirements Questionnaire <http://www.license.state.tx.us/elect...ms/Electrician Requirements Questionnaire.pdf>. We want to assist in keeping all electricians in Texas adequately informed, so please get us the information as soon as you can. Your input is invaluable!
    Municipal Licensing and Regulation information for Electricians
    2008 NEC Code Adoption & State Electrical Exams
    Effective last September, TDLR adopted the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC) as the "minimum standard" for all non-exempt electrical work in Texas. All examinations for state electrical licenses are now based on the 2008 NEC. The state electrical exams are available through the International Code Council (ICC). For more information about the examination go to <http://www2.iccsafe.org/contractor/dsp_state.cfm?state=TX> and make sure to review the 2009 Texas Electrical Examination Bulletin.

    on those pages there was contact info, perhaps that might help?

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 03-19-2009 at 08:09 AM.

  12. #12
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Thanks, Guys. Your help is simply outstanding and helps be understand why this is so confusing.

    In terms of inspection - we're tied to a TRCC inspection as we have a registered builder. I believe he's acting in good faith, but many many inspectors aren't up to date on the 2008 NEC, nor are they typically looking for houses in the Lago Vista area that conform to the 2008 NEC.

    I'm not at the point where I want to call in an authority at this point, I simply want to understand and be able reference building requirements in regard to this project. As you've illustrated, the electrical issue is confusing.

    I know the builder will act in good faith - I've worked with him before. Technically owns management of the electrical subcontractor. I'm simply looking for written references to encourage the subcontractor to comply.

    In regard to being finished - we're not in the house yet, we're on site in an RV. Final draw has not been completed. The electrical subcontractor has not been paid. We're waiting on an LCRA approval for septic before we occupy the house.


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Rural TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Quote Originally Posted by Darin Ginther View Post
    I'm simply looking for written references to encourage the subcontractor to comply.

    The electrical subcontractor has not been paid.

    Darin,

    What does your contract with the builder/electrical contractor state?

    If your contract is worded such that the work shall be done in conformance with all applicable codes, that should serve as the written reference you are looking for.

    Combine that with a check filled out in the electrical contractors name for an amount less than is owed, showing the reduction is retainage for "work still not completed - AFCI protection not installed", those two things should bring the electrical contractor to the table and open the same book you have and turn to the same page. That is one way to get them 'on the same page' you are.

    Wording such as "shall be done in conformance with" is, or at least should be, in all contracts. Wording such as "all applicable code" should also be in all contracts. That one combined statement *includes* 'his' 2005 NEC *AND* 'your' 2008 NEC as *both* are included in the word "all" applicable codes.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Extra Territorial jurisdiction might be city might be county seat city I don't know what the "3" designation is.

    This might be helpful (see link) at least the source of the rule might be able to help you determine what the ET3 designation is and is not and the authorities granted to which home-rule jurisdiction or lack there-of (local city or county seat or none and reverts to state code minimums) and inquire if the rule itself was updated or effected by the law changes in the legislature.

    Hope this helps (texas administrative code link TRCC) Near the top under little (c)(4)(A), (B),and (C) it discusses electrical code(s) and the extra territorial areas of home-rule jurisdictions - might help you in your quest for answers? (and little (c)(8)).

    I may have seen a reference regarding home-rule city authority being cited to article XI, section 5, of the Texas Constitution.

    This might help:
    IAEI: State Regulations &mdash; Texas, Adopted Codes

    I get the impression that the jurisdictional boundries exceed the physical boundries of a home-rule body (i.e. extra-territorial).

    Best of luck with your endeavors,

    H.G.
    Link: : Texas Administrative Code


  15. #15
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Re: Rural TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Darin,

    What does your contract with the builder/electrical contractor state?
    I have no view into the contract with the electrical contractor. I can ask for that disclosure, but I don't think I need to go there yet.

    I'll need to review my residential real estate contract. The builder isn't bucking the system here - he'll back me, but needs the references that you guys have provided here. Early in this process we had discussions of 2005 vs 2008 NEC code.. Part of the problem is that the original electrician that was working on this house (same contracting company) was terminated by his employer so now we're dealing with someone new.

    The GC is very good in terms of structure and has a lot of building experience. I don't think that electrical is one of his stronger points.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: Rural TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Quote Originally Posted by Darin Ginther View Post
    I have no view into the contract with the electrical contractor. I can ask for that disclosure, but I don't think I need to go there yet.

    I'll need to review my residential real estate contract.
    That contract should also address those requirements as it is for "new construction". The contract may be different if you are buying a home from a builder located on the builder's lot, and you are simply 'buying the package', but, with your RV on *your* lot (I presume it is your lot), then the contract was more for the construction of the house than a 'real estate contract'.

    Regardless, though, I would review your contract, and simply ask the GC (who is on your side) if his contract with the electrical company included a requirement to build to *all applicable codes*, usually worded something like 'all applicable, local, state and federal codes' ... usually *all* encompassing, which is its intent, that way, when someone walks up and says to the builder 'Your electrician is dumping hazardous material in the pond behind the house and that is against EPA regulation blah, blah, blah, and I am holding you responsible for the clean up costs', the builder can then turn to the electrician and say 'here is a bill for the clean up costs for dumping hazardous material in the pond back there, *YOU DID AGREE* to cover this when you agreed to meeting all applicable local, state and federal codes in the contract'.

    Your case is just a 'yep, that section of the contract applies here too' situation.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  17. #17
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Re: Rural TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Thanks, Jerry.
    I do own the lot.

    I'm going to give the GC some time to work it out with the sub to my level of satisfaction before I increase the level of heat. In my experience he'll do whatever it takes to get it right once he's aware of a requirement.

    Our final electrical inspection (TRCC requirement) is still pending. It'll be interesting to see what, if anything, they find.


  18. #18
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Well, the contractor came back out and I think we're about 80&#37; there - we have arc fault in what I believe is most of the livable space. I'm coordinating with the GC's "required" TRCC inspector to push on final issues and make sure that inspector is familiar with 2008 NEC.

    Issues I see are: "dedicated" circuits in the garage that are easily accessible, but not GFI.
    Additional AFCIs required - I believe just about all heated space circuits need to be protected.
    Poor labeling on the main breaker, we've got circuits that are simply not labeled and some circuits that are labeled incorrect, IE "pool" label, but the house has no pool.

    You guys have been great.

    Last edited by Darin Ginther; 03-23-2009 at 10:00 AM.

  19. #19
    Robert Olson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Darin, Travis County has never adopted a building code and you'd be hard pressed to get them to inspect. If Lago Vista states your property is in their ETJ (Extra terriotorial jurisdiction) you'd have better luck with them. They have adopted the IBC 2000 and NEC 1999 - sorta behind the times. They last revisited their ordinances in 2007 and as the ETJ authority, they may have the final say so. My suggestion is to hire a licensed home inspector in Travis County to look over the work and generate a punch list. Well worth the money charged, just make sure he brings his standards book with him.


  20. #20
    Darin Ginther's Avatar
    Darin Ginther Guest

    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Lago Vista does not do inspections in the ETJ. I've spoken with the city several times. As you've noted, Lago Vista is behind the times in regard to NEC. The GC says that sometimes we can get the city inspectors to do a little "side work" - but in this case, I think we'll seek another source for the desired experience.

    I agree with your suggestion - we'll pull someone in from Travis county that should be familiar with 2008 NEC.

    We have a TRCC inspection scheduled that's about a week out, I'm going to try to work with that inpector first. If he can't do - or isn't familar enough with electrical, I'll try to find a specalist. I've had someone off this forum email me and drop a name of someone who might be qualified to do "code leve" inspections on electrical implementation.


  21. #21
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Without reading every post in this thread, so at the risk of repeating someone else, here goes:

    TDLR's decisions about what electricians do or do not do has no bearing on the TRCC requirement for the builder to comply with the adopted code of the county seat, when the municipality has not adopted a code. So then, call the AHJ in the county and find out what was enforcing as of the date of the project's commencement and you'll have your code.


  22. #22
    Fred Warner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rurual TX inspections: 2008 NEC

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    Fred: You don't know the half of it. We have multiple boards consisting of the usual wackos in Austin who write all manner of rules that may or may not be applicable locally as the state support local option on nearly all issues.

    Plumbers can do electrical work, but electricians can only use the facilities.

    You have to be licensed and insured to cut hair, but you can build multi-million dollar homes with nothing but a $300 registration.

    The list is very long.

    This is what happens when you mix bible-belt republicans with construction reality - a holy cluster fu*&.
    Well said.


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