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Thread: New Splice Type

  1. #1
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    Default New Splice Type

    I hadn't seen this before, but it was in a newer house. Is this allowable as an in-line splice on line voltage? It looked pretty secure to me.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    I have not seen those or searched the internet for those, however, the 2008 NEC requires a box or conduit body to be installed there.
    - 300.15 Boxes, Conduit Bodies, or Fittings — Where Required.
    - - A box shall be installed at each outlet and switch point for concealed knob-and-tube wiring.
    - - Fittings and connectors shall be used only with the specific wiring methods for which they are designed and listed.
    - - Where the wiring method is conduit, tubing, Type AC cable, Type MC cable, Type MI cable, nonmetallic-sheathed cable, or other cables, a box or conduit body shall be installed at each conductor splice point, outlet point, switch point, junction point, termination point, or pull point, unless otherwise permitted in 300.15(A) through (M).
    (Jerry's note: I found nothing in (A) through (M) below which allows for what is in the photo, with the *possible* exception of 'H' but that would need to be confirmed with the items listing and labeling.)
    - - - (A) Wiring Methods with Interior Access. A box or conduit body shall not be required for each splice, junction, switch, pull, termination, or outlet points in wiring methods with removable covers, such as wireways, multioutlet assemblies, auxiliary gutters, and surface raceways. The covers shall be accessible after installation. (Jerry's note: that looks like it might fit here too, in which case the device needs to be accessible and that attic installation does not appear to be "access (as applied to equipment). Accessible (as applied to equipment). Admitting close approach; not guarded by locked doors, elevation, or other effective means.)
    - - - (B) Equipment. An integral junction box or wiring compartment as part of approved equipment shall be permitted in lieu of a box.
    - - - (C) Protection. A box or conduit body shall not be required where cables enter or exit from conduit or tubing that is used to provide cable support or protection against physical damage. A fitting shall be provided on the end(s) of the conduit or tubing to protect the cable from abrasion.
    - - - (D) Type MI Cable. A box or conduit body shall not be required where accessible fittings are used for straight-through splices in mineral-insulated metal-sheathed cable.
    - - - (E) Integral Enclosure. A wiring device with integral enclosure identified for the use, having brackets that securely fasten the device to walls or ceilings of conventional on-site frame construction, for use with nonmetallic-sheathed cable, shall be permitted in lieu of a box or conduit body.
    - - - - FPN: See 334.30(C); 545.10; 550.15(I); 551.47(E), Exception No. 1; and 552.48(E), Exception No. 1.
    - - - (F) Fitting. A fitting identified for the use shall be permitted in lieu of a box or conduit body where conductors are not spliced or terminated within the fitting. The fitting shall be accessible after installation.
    - - - (G) Direct-Buried Conductors. As permitted in 300.5(E), a box or conduit body shall not be required for splices and taps in direct-buried conductors and cables.
    - - - (H) Insulated Devices. As permitted in 334.40(B), a box or conduit body shall not be required for insulated devices supplied by nonmetallic-sheathed cable.
    - - - (I) Enclosures. A box or conduit body shall not be required where a splice, switch, terminal, or pull point is in a cabinet or cutout box, in an enclosure for a switch or overcurrent device as permitted in 312.8, in a motor controller as permitted in 430.10(A), or in a motor control center.
    - - - (J) Luminaires. A box or conduit body shall not be required where a luminaire is used as a raceway as permitted in 410.64 and 410.65.
    - - - (K) Embedded. A box or conduit body shall not be required for splices where conductors are embedded as permitted in 424.40, 424.41(D), 426.22(B), 426.24(A), and 427.19(A).
    - - - (L) Manholes and Handhole Enclosures. A box or conduit body shall not be required for conductors in manholes or handhole enclosures, except where connecting to electrical equipment. The installation shall comply with the provisions of Part V of Article 110 for manholes, and 314.30 for handhole enclosures.
    - - - (M) Closed Loop. A box shall not be required with a closed-loop power distribution system where a device identified and listed as suitable for installation without a box is used.

    Just some thoughts and food for thought.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    They are made by Tyco and are permitted.

    334.40 Boxes and Fittings
    (B) Devices of Insulating Material. Switch, outlet, and tap devices
    of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in
    exposed cable wiring and for rewiring in existing buildings where the
    cable is concealed and fished
    . Openings in such devices shall form a
    close fit around the outer covering of the cable and the device shall
    fully enclose the part of the cable from which any part of the coverings
    has been removed. Where connections to conductors are by binding
    screw terminals, there shall be available as many terminals as
    conductors.

    NM connector Brochure(PDF)


  4. #4

    Default Re: New Splice Type

    I believe Michael is correct.

    I found a couple of these a few years ago, and after doing research I found out that they were allowed.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Larson View Post
    They are made by Tyco and are permitted.

    334.40 Boxes and Fittings
    (B) Devices of Insulating Material. Switch, outlet, and tap devices
    of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in
    exposed cable wiring and for rewiring in existing buildings where the
    cable is concealed and fished. Openings in such devices shall form a
    close fit around the outer covering of the cable and the device shall
    fully enclose the part of the cable from which any part of the coverings
    has been removed. Where connections to conductors are by binding
    screw terminals, there shall be available as many terminals as
    conductors.

    NM connector Brochure(PDF)
    Specifically, that is a "splice" connector and not a "tap" connector. Even the information in the link you provided (thank you for that link) states such is the case.

    Which raises a question under the code to which they state it is listed to.

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Very typical in mobile, modular and manufactured housing. This is how the section wiring is completed.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    It was in the crawl space, very easily accessible. That was the stuff. Thanks for the link.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    The FEDs say they're OK in the stuff they approve as housing units. And, I seriously doubt that lousy wording in the NEC will get the practice stopped.

    The "splice" does, however, meet the definition of a device as it "carries electrical energy" as its primary function. And, devices without boxes are permitted. The difference here is that a device needs to be accessable, but the tap is specifically allowed not to be . Go Figure

    I'd say the only fight you have is when copper goes back up and guys start using a bunch of these in series to get rid of roll ends maybe you can bite them on workmanship.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kriegh View Post
    The difference here is that a device needs to be accessable,

    Precisely.

    And in addition to that, the "tap" is specifically mentioned in the code referenced as to what that is listed to and the "splice" *is not* included in it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    A "device" has a specific definition. The "splice" fits the definition of a device. Non metallic devices that don't require boxes are permitted - 300.15(E). Therefore the splice is permitted. It just may be that 334.40 isn't the blurb that gets it done - regardless what the manufacturer's data sheet says. And it has a UL type approval for its intended use so it's "approved for the purpose"

    Are you saying the splice isn't permitted?

    Seems to me like I've seen them for 15-20 years or so. I'm sure if there was an issue with using them it would have come up before now.


  11. #11
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Due to the limited field of vision in the photo I could not tell if the required strain reliefs were installed.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    According to this it is wrong.

    Attached Files Attached Files

  13. #13
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Figure 3 in the PDF posted shows that strain relief is built in.

    What was in the PDF that said that this was wrong?


  14. #14
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Start with this link Michael posted which shows the splice and talks about (requires) installing the external strain relief but does not show it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Larson View Post
    Then go to this link which Aaron posted which shows the 'T' tap and the external strain relief.

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    Now to this:

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
    Figure 3 in the PDF posted shows that strain relief is built in.

    What was in the PDF that said that this was wrong?
    Jim,

    What is shown in the link Aaron posted *does not* have a strain relief built in, it specifically shows the external strain relief. You may be confused where it points to where the external strain relief is mounted to.

    From the link Michael posted: (underlining and bold are mine)
    - Installation is as easy as 1,2,3…
    - - Step 1 – Strip and remove the cable outer sheath and cut the splice
    conductors to length.
    - - - • No need to strip or remove the insulation from the conductors,
    only to expose them.
    - - Step 2 – Place the conductors in the Tap or Splice Connector, and
    snap (splice) or screw (tap) the Connector Cover down over the
    conductors, and install the external strain reliefs.
    - - Step 3 – Plug the Splice & Splice or Splice & Tap together…
    - Presto! Installation Complete!

    Therein lies the problem and the reason Aaron said it was wrong: The external strain relief was not installed on the splice connection in the photo. The external strain reliefs are REQUIRED to be installed in "Step 2". The external strain relief is shown in the link Aaron posted.

    Now, going back to the link Michael posted, scrolling down to page 11, where it shows the tap connector, in a big red box it states (being as I cannot put a big red box here with white text in it, I will make the text red): "Note: For clarity, the connectors are shown without external strain reliefs".

    You will find the same note on page 14: "Note: For clarity, the connectors are shown without external strain reliefs".



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  15. #15
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    OK my opinion.

    I have read all posted, checked a couple b ooks, read the info in link. I officially determine it is the best attempt at proper splicing I have seen in a long time and I officially allow it. Now all I need is the rest of the inspection world to concur.

    I would not write it up. Its in a crawl. tThe wires appear to be tucked up nice and tight to the underside of the framing.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    OK my opinion.

    I have read all posted, checked a couple b ooks, read the info in link. I officially determine it is the best attempt at proper splicing I have seen in a long time and I officially allow it. Now all I need is the rest of the inspection world to concur.

    I would not write it up. Its in a crawl. tThe wires appear to be tucked up nice and tight to the underside of the framing.
    Ted: Sorry, but without the required strain reliefs installed, the installation is not code complinat as per NEC 110.3(B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling.


  17. #17
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    I would point out that the original photo Jim posted, it does not show strain reliefs required but for all we know the NM is stapled within 12" on both sides of the "splice" but does not show in the photo just as Arron stated.


  18. #18
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Larson View Post
    I would point out that the original photo Jim posted, it does not show strain reliefs required but for all we know the NM is stapled within 12" on both sides of the "splice" but does not show in the photo just as Arron stated.

    Regardless, the external strain reliefs are *required* to be installed and used as show in the instructions.

    *THEN*, yes, then, *the NM cable must still be* secured and supported within 12" of that device.

    The device 'may', but is not required to be, also additionally secured to a stud or other support.

    Here is why"
    From the 2008 NEC. (underlining is mine)
    - 334.30 Securing and Supporting.
    - - Nonmetallic-sheathed cable shall be supported and secured by staples, cable ties, straps, hangers, or similar fittings designed and installed so as not to damage the cable, at intervals not exceeding 1.4 m (4 ft) and within 300 mm (12 in.) of every outlet box, junction box, cabinet, or fitting. Flat cables shall not be stapled on edge.

    - - Fitting. An accessory such as a locknut, bushing, or other part of a wiring system that is intended primarily to perform a mechanical rather than an electrical function.

    Just like securing NM cable within 12" of a junction box with its strain relief, that needs the NM cable to be secured within 12" of its strain relief.

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  19. #19
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    I know this is pulling hairs and not listed for being adequate but the ends of that little splice deal appear to have elongated indents between the 2 little holes that appear to push against the sheathing on each side and maybe quite effectively adding strain relief.

    Just trying to read the picture. It gets blurry when I blow it up.


  20. #20
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    quite effectively adding strain relief.

    If they were "quite effective" (dropping the "ly"), I really doubt the manufacturer would not have gone to the expense and trouble to manufacture those external strain reliefs ... which just complicate the installation they are trying to keep simple.

    Hmmm ... just more food for thought ... wonder if those external strain reliefs were designed to provide for, i.e., allow for, the proper minimum radius bending of the NM cable?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  21. #21
    Mike Truss Guy's Avatar
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    Talking Re: New Splice Type

    I'm no electrician, but I find that connection shocking. It goes against everything we've been taught since we were little. Splices are always inside a box because they are a source of heat that needs to be isolated from combustibles...like wood and paper insulation. My guess is that the manufacturer got some a code report that tested it for heat, strength, and other properties that make it safe when used as directed. I'm sure it works as good and is cheaper or it would never have been used at all. Still it makes me a little uneasy.

    Many times in the codes there are exceptions for proprietary products that were created specifically to circumvent strict sections of the code. That's why every "lobbyists" from various industries are always present at code change meetings. You might think that they would be there to ask that they make the code LESS restrictive. That's not always true. What better way to increase sales than by making the code require more of your product to comply with code? Think about metal hold-downs. Twenty years ago you rarely saw huge metal anchors into the concrete. Today, they are everywhere in construction from the slab up on to the roof. Sure they make the building safer, but unless you are in a hurricane, tornado, or earthquake zone...when's the last time you saw a wall fly off of the foundation? Do we really need 1" bolts to hold the wall to the foundation? I mean really...but I digress.


  22. #22
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Many times in the codes there are exceptions for proprietary products that were created specifically to circumvent strict sections of the code. That's why every "lobbyists" from various industries are always present at code change meetings.
    MTG: Honestly, you should not speak so bluntly here. They will begin to think we are somehow related. . .


  23. #23
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    That connector is a real debate-starter in electrical circles.

    Designed originally for use in mobile homes and manufactured housing,it is actually listed and marketd for use as shown. That is, the packaging makes clear that this is a splice that does NOT need a box.

    The debate arises when these connectors are used in something besides a factory-built home.

    As things stand right now, the NEC allows this sort of splice. I expectthat the next edition will address the matter.


  24. #24
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by John Steinke View Post
    That connector is a real debate-starter in electrical circles.

    Designed originally for use in mobile homes and manufactured housing,it is actually listed and marketd for use as shown. That is, the packaging makes clear that this is a splice that does NOT need a box.

    The debate arises when these connectors are used in something besides a factory-built home.

    As things stand right now, the NEC allows this sort of splice. I expectthat the next edition will address the matter.
    John: My biggest concern is that they will soon be arriving at Home Depot, Lowes, et al., for all the HGTV-"educated", drooling, stars-in-their-eyes,
    fuc*-it-up-yourselfers. I am ordering more red ink . . .


  25. #25
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Quote Originally Posted by John Steinke View Post
    As things stand right now, the NEC allows this sort of splice.

    John,

    When ... installed in accordance with its listing, labeling and installation instructions ... which does not show it is allowed to be installed "like that", see above posts regarding the installation instruction requirements.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  26. #26
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    Nice try, Jerry - but no cigar!

    Check with your UL guy .... there is no such listing restriction. As we speak, the halls of UL are buzzing with this issue, and how to address it. I'd be most surprised if the next NEC edition does not speak to the topic.


  27. #27
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    Default Re: New Splice Type

    OK folks stop right there !

    I can not find anywhere in this post that states who the manufacture is, of the item in question. I can only find a link to a pdf of ONE manufactures product.

    Are any of you sure that the one in the picture is manufactured and listed by the manufacture in the PDF link ? Does anyone have the paperwork that came with this one unit?

    News Flash there are more then one manufacture of these. I was at an IAEI meeting last evening and was looking at one of these and it had no external strain reliefs and was listed by UL

    Before anyone else jumps off the deep end here lets try and find out what it is we are really looking at.
    Not to knock anyone but come on a guy in New Mexico takes a picture of an item and another in Wisconsin tells you what it is and provides a link to a manufacture and everyone automatically puts them together.


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