Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    3,177

    Default vehicle door opener needs GFCI?

    New construction. No vehicle door opener installed, but there is a receptacle outlet in the garage ceiling, marked "GFCI protected", but it isn't.
    Is it not required to be because it isn't readily accessible?

    Similar Threads:
    2018 ASHI InspectionWorld
    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    On The Mason-Dixon Line
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: vehicle door opener needs GFCI?

    In the 2008 National Electrical Code Every Receptacle in the garage must be GFCI protected.
    If the jurisdiction is still on the 2005 or earlier NEC then it is not a code requirement,just a good idea


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia PA
    Posts
    3,177

    Default Re: vehicle door opener needs GFCI?

    Ken - Thanks.

    "There is no exception to the rule that every rule has an exception." -James Thurber, writer and cartoonist (1894-1961)
    www.ArnoldHomeInspections.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: vehicle door opener needs GFCI?

    Quote Originally Posted by ken horak View Post
    In the 2008 National Electrical Code Every Receptacle in the garage must be GFCI protected.
    If the jurisdiction is still on the 2005 or earlier NEC then it is not a code requirement,just a good idea
    And the supporting documentation for the removal of those GFCI exceptions was two-fold:
    1) Because the appliance (the garage door opener) has been required to be made to a very low ground fault leakage for the past 20+ years.
    2) Because, no fooling, it was improper *not to protect* tall people with GFCI protection when it is installed to protect all others, or when other-than-tall-people could not reach something it was okay to not protect it ... that argument no longer flies with the good technologies of today for GFCI and low ground fault leakage of appliances.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •