Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Scott Hurt's Avatar
    Scott Hurt Guest

    Default split bolt connector configuration

    I didn't have my camera so hopefully I can describe what is going on. (1979 home).

    The uninsulated stranded neutral of the 3-wire subfeeders from the main are routed to a bolt connector.

    On the opposite side of the split bolt connector are equipment grounds bundled together into the connector.

    In the middle of the split bolt connector, is a metal divider that separates the stranded neutral subfeeder and the equipment grounds.

    The neutrals go to a bus bar but I didn't see where there neutral subfeeder had a connection to the bus bar, just to the split bolt connector.

    Are these items to be written up for repairs? Or is it just a code compliance issue between 1979 versus 2009?

    thanks,

    Scott

    Similar Threads:
    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: split bolt connector configuration

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Hurt View Post
    The uninsulated stranded neutral of the 3-wire subfeeders from the main are routed to a bolt connector.
    Whoa ... let's stop there ...

    If you are referring to a neural which is a feeder (WTH is a "subfeeder") and "not a service entrance conductor", then IT IS REQUIRED to be insulated.

    On the opposite side of the split bolt connector are equipment grounds bundled together into the connector.
    Everything you are describing so far is way out of whack.

    Scott,

    Start over again and address the conductors the correct way to make sure we are all on the same page:
    - the conductor from the meter to the service equipment are the service entrance conductors
    - the conductors after the service equipment are feeders which supply a panel
    - - or branch circuit conductors coming off breakers/fuses in the service equipment when there is a panel as part of the service equipment

    If you are referring to the service entrance conductor neutral, then you have a problem with the way things are connected.

    If you are referring to feeders supplying a panel, then the main problem is that the neutral is not insulated, with the way things are connected being a secondary problem.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Scott Hurt's Avatar
    Scott Hurt Guest

    Default Re: split bolt connector configuration

    Jerry,

    Yes, I am referring to feeders supplying the panel.

    But in 1979 it was okay to install the neutral without being insulated. So then I don't understand why it would be written up as a defect now; what you are saying is it is a defect and should be written up , as well as the equpiment grounds and feeder neutral to the split bolt connector?

    Would you just say that the wiring configuration inside the Slyvania panel is not to current NEC code and have electrician make all appropriate repairs?


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: split bolt connector configuration

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Hurt View Post
    Yes, I am referring to feeders supplying the panel.

    But in 1979 it was okay to install the neutral without being insulated.
    They were? Do you have a code section for that?

    I pulled out an old NEC, happened to be the 1962 NEC, and it says:
    - Article 32-Bare-Conductor Feeders
    - - 328-1. Use. By special permission, are conductors installed in accordance with the provisions of Sections 300-1 to 300-22 inclusive and in accordance with the provisions of the following Sections 328-1 to 328-7 inclusive may be used for feeders only. Such bar conductors may be installed on in a chase, channel or shaft of non-combustible material in a building of fire-resistive construction; and only where the voltage between conductors does not exceed 600 volts. Bare conductors shall not be used in damp or wet locations, nor in any hazardous location, nor where subject to corrosive vapor, except in storage-battery rooms as provided in Section 480-7.

    If you are seeing a bare neutral feeder in a dwelling unit, you are seeing a big problem.

    Would you just say that the wiring configuration inside the Slyvania panel is not to current NEC code and have electrician make all appropriate repairs?
    No. I would say it was not even complaint at the time of installation.

    Again, you keep saying it was acceptable in 1979, please provide a code reference stating such was the case.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Scott Hurt's Avatar
    Scott Hurt Guest

    Default Re: split bolt connector configuration

    my bad...i was "assuming" that in '79 it was compliant.

    Why is having an uninsulated neutral subfeeder a "big" problem"?

    Also,

    would the equipment grounds and the neutral subfeeder going to a split bolt connector a deficiency/repair item?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,252

    Default Re: split bolt connector configuration

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Hurt View Post
    Why is having an uninsulated neutral subfeeder a "big" problem"?
    The neutral is required to be separated, isolated and insulated, from ground at all points after the load side of the service equipment, otherwise the neutral current will be carried on the neutral conductor AND the grounding conductors, which ARE NOT INTENDED to carry current. Those grounding paths are only there for safety, and carrying current on them is unsafe.

    would the equipment grounds and the neutral subfeeder going to a split bolt connector a deficiency/repair item?
    Yes, not only is the neutral NOT insulated and isolated from ground, it is tied directly to those grounds.

    Additionally, the split bolt connector is designed to have one conductor on each side of the divider piece, not one on one side of it and more than one on the other side of it.

    Your description puts ALL the neutral and ground current on the uninsulated neutral conductor.

    What that says to be (besides the screw-up at the connection) is that feeder *may have been* service entrance conductor originally and that panel was the service equipment originally, then someone added new service equipment and *did not replace the service entrance cable with feeder conductor cable*.

    Which brings up another potential problem: Back then ... in 1979 ... it is quite possible that the panel you are looking at is rated as "Suitable for Service Equipment ONLY", which means the neutral is not even isolated from ground in the panel, which means that panel also needs to be replaced.

    Also curious as to why, and what, made you assume that feeders did not have to be insulated in 1979??

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •